Experience with T1 Tool steel

Discussion in 'Shop Talk - BladeSmith Questions and Answers' started by Tyler Nelson, Sep 19, 2019.

  1. Tyler Nelson

    Tyler Nelson

    4
    Sep 18, 2019
    Does anyone have experience with heat treating T1 HSS?

    My cousin told me he had a sheet of tool steel to make knives out of, we have access to a laser, so I drew up a few CADD files and he cut them out for me. When I asked him what kind of tool steel it was he told me T1, which I had no clue about. When I looked up the heat treatment guidelines it seemed really daunting. Tungsten alloy seems to require a lot more heat than your average knife steels. Now I have 4 blanks and I'm not sure how hard it will be to work them.

    So my question is, can I do it myself in a homemade forge or with a torch, or should I try and get them done professionally? Will they suffer for ductility and flexibility if I do it myself?
     
  2. BitingSarcasm

    BitingSarcasm

    Feb 25, 2014
    The most efficient way to prevent a knife-shaped object from becoming a knife is to botch a heat treat. If you look around on the forums you will notice that there are a number of makers who send their blanks out to be heat treated by professionals who understand the process and have things like computer controlled ovens for tempering. You could do it for yourself, but the chances of getting it right on your rookie outing with a steel you have never worked with and that may require special attention seem rather small. If you want to end up with one knife in the end, you could try and learn on the first 3 and there is nothing wrong with that. If you want 4 knives at the end of the process, take the time and expense to hire out the heat treat.
     
  3. JTknives

    JTknives Blade Heat Treating www.jarodtodd.com Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jun 11, 2006
    Is it actually took steel? There is another T1 alloy that’s used as a wear plate. We use a ton of it at work for cylinder mounts and such.
     
    Nick Dunham likes this.
  4. Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith

    Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith ilmarinen - MODERATOR Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 20, 2004
    T-1 is a high tungsten (18%) tools steel for high temperature and high wear tools. While it can get hard, it has very low toughness, and would not work very well as a knife steel. The edge would likely chip easily. The HT is very complex and requires two ovens, according to my ASM book. I would suggest using the lower range of austenitization temps and shoot for a blade with a final hardness or Rc58.

    There are many much better steels that T-1 for making a knife. Just because it is free doesn't mean it is good.
     
  5. MBB

    MBB Gold Member Gold Member

    244
    Apr 18, 2014
    It needs to be heated to 2300-2375 F for hardening (approximately 65 HRC), so I would definitely send it to Peters for heat treating. In terms of the knife you make with it, concentrate on making slicers rather than choppers. If you view it as an experiment, you will probably enjoy the experience substantially more.
     
    Tyler Nelson likes this.
  6. Natlek

    Natlek

    Jun 9, 2015
    I m HSS lover :D I have make several knife from T-1 /planer blade / they cut and cut and ...........cut .Not steel for chopper but for light use it is enjoy to use ..........I like them , I mean HSS steels ......all of them :thumbsup:
     
    Tyler Nelson likes this.
  7. Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith

    Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith ilmarinen - MODERATOR Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 20, 2004
    Yes, it will cut well at high hardness, but only for a delicate slicer. However W-2, 52100, 1095, 26C3, etc. will all do that as well or better. 18% is a lot more tungsten than most any knife will need, and it will likely affect edge life severely. On a 87 degree drill bit or milling tool edge it is a beast ... on a 14 degree slicer it is a wimp.

    Tyler just joined and didn't fill out his profile (hint...hint), so all I now is he is 26 years old. Assuming he is a novice, shaping the steel, HT, and post-HT grinding will likely be far out of his skill set.
     
  8. DevinT

    DevinT KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jan 29, 2010
    T1 is not made in sheets, it is a bar product. I don’t think it is made much any more either. I’m with JT on this one.

    Hoss
     
  9. bluntcut

    bluntcut KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Apr 28, 2012
    A pid controlled gas oven should able to ht t1 for functional result. Ht with a torch required extensive experiences, especially in eyeballing temperature and blade will suffer deep decarb, hence expect lousy result.

    I recommend send t1 blades to HT services, ask them if they supports ht t1. As for small shop ht, some recent Paragon oven supports heat to 2350F; Evenheat KO oven supports up to 2400F. Keep in mind, 309 ss foil is rated for max 2240F, so ht need to use multilayer when using 309 ss foil.

    At 65rc, I expect T1 be tougher than T-15. I've done quite a few CPM T-15 test coupons & blades with hardness 64-69rc. CPM T-15 65rc chop test - search w/i my channel to see all cpm t-15 related videos.
     
  10. Tyler Nelson

    Tyler Nelson

    4
    Sep 18, 2019
    Bold of you to assume as much from just my age. But go ahead with that assumption.
     
  11. John mc c

    John mc c KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    454
    Aug 23, 2018
    If you filled out your profile properly(thus the hint hint)Stacy wouldn't have to assume anything
    Everyone that posted is only trying to help you
     
  12. Tyler Nelson

    Tyler Nelson

    4
    Sep 18, 2019
    I understand. And there are a ton of helpful comments here. I guess the people who have been here longer are allowed some snark and the ones who have just gotten here are not.
     
  13. Tyler Nelson

    Tyler Nelson

    4
    Sep 18, 2019
    This is a good point and I will double check with my cousin.
     
  14. Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith

    Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith ilmarinen - MODERATOR Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 20, 2004
    No snark intended. I was pointing out that I didn't have any idea what your skills were, and suggesting you fill out your profile so we know a bit about you and where you live.
    Since you were asking about HTing T1 in a homemade forge or using a torch, it was a reasonable assumption you were fairly new at HT. T1 is not a forge or flame HT steel.
     
  15. tex_n_cal

    tex_n_cal

    3
    Jan 28, 2006
    Stumbled across this thread in a Google Search. I'd be delighted to FIND some T1. It was formerly known as Rex AA when sold by Crucible. It worked extremely well for shearing hard metals, like spring steels. Diehl Steel says they have it, but they don't. My use has nothing to do with knives, but I'd love to know a source for large (1¼") squares or similar plate.
     
  16. Willie71

    Willie71 Warren J. Krywko. Part Time Knifemaker Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Feb 23, 2013
    have you tried Hudson?
     
  17. Willie71

    Willie71 Warren J. Krywko. Part Time Knifemaker Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Feb 23, 2013
    Just checked, they don’t have it.
     
  18. JTknives

    JTknives Blade Heat Treating www.jarodtodd.com Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jun 11, 2006
    I have a small stash of it but it’s planer blades so not big squares.
     

Share This Page