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Forged Craftsman?

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by Freedom Pullo, Jun 11, 2018.

  1. Freedom Pullo

    Freedom Pullo Gold Member Gold Member

    873
    Dec 31, 2015
    I picked up a 3 1/2 lb Craftsman last week that I think dates to the 1950’s. After a little love from a brass cup brush and some vinegar I found an unusual pattern about 1/2” from the edge of the bit.


    Is this mark a forged weld between two different pieces of steel?

    88CC0FFC-0303-4CBB-B7E8-8B1D214D6513.jpeg 2AB927EB-C625-4440-82DC-AD1B77FE4474.jpeg 01759369-95C3-47AA-B2F2-30FAE14ADE4A.jpeg 96A0452D-C989-46EC-95BC-F292D76F8972.jpeg
     
  2. Miller '72

    Miller '72

    Jul 25, 2017
    I believe what you found there from the soak is the temper line.
    If so, there is a long life still ahead for that fella.
     
    Freedom Pullo likes this.
  3. A17

    A17

    369
    Jan 9, 2018
    That's a unsteady hand holding it to a grinder mark.:D
     
  4. Miller '72

    Miller '72

    Jul 25, 2017
    Oh...Or that ;)
     
  5. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
    That's from someone sharpening it on a bench grinder, and this axe would've been drop forged from one single piece of steel.
    I think you're right about this axe being from the 50's, especially with the evidence of a metallic mint green paint.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2018
    Square_peg likes this.
  6. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    Those old convex-cheeked Craftsmans are great axes.
     
  7. eveled

    eveled Gold Member Basic Member Gold Member

    574
    Mar 11, 2016
    What about the straight line above his thumb? Is it on both sides? I like that Craftsman logo.
     
    Miller '72 likes this.
  8. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
    Just a temper line, a forge welded bit usually won't be a straight line .
     
  9. eveled

    eveled Gold Member Basic Member Gold Member

    574
    Mar 11, 2016
    I knew it wasn't a weld line. It's a very pronounced and precise temper line. Pretty neat, nice to know that you aren't going to run out of hard edge.

    Nice axe, it needs a nice hickory handle and some swinging.
     
  10. survivor45

    survivor45

    102
    Feb 15, 2018
    Freedom Pullo likes this.
  11. Freedom Pullo

    Freedom Pullo Gold Member Gold Member

    873
    Dec 31, 2015
    I forgot to watch this thread, thank you all for the info and I am looking forward to putting this head on a 36” handle and using it to thin out a stand of scraggly pines out back.:D
     
  12. Freedom Pullo

    Freedom Pullo Gold Member Gold Member

    873
    Dec 31, 2015
    No green paint, I found a similar Craftsman logo on a grinder from the 50’s and more info In a thread here.

    I did just pick up a later flat cheeked mystery “M” axe with a 3 1/2 lb head that looks like a cedar pattern that did have green paint that covered the head and extended halfway down the handle.

    It also had a red “safety goggle” sticker on its handle, any idea when manufacturers started recommending eye protection?
     
  13. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
    Are those not all pictures of your axe ?
    Because I can see the paint in the pictures of the stamp.

    For that M axe, this M is widely believed to indicate Mann but was also in use at a time when they were secretly having some heads forged in Mexico.
    This axe is probably from the 80's and a can almost guarantee it's supposed to be a Michigan pattern.
    Your CRAFTSMAN is what a Michigan used to look like.
     
    Freedom Pullo likes this.
  14. Steve Tall

    Steve Tall

    Aug 28, 2010
    Late 1970s, it seems.


    Some background:

    The earliest references I found were some newspaper articles from the late 1970s, like this article from 1977 that said:

    "Each hammer meeting the ANSI safety standard is required to carry a warning statement alerting the user to the danger of eye injury and urging the use of safety goggles."

    Another reference identifies the ANSI standard for "Heavy Striking Tools -- Safety Requirements" as ANSI/HTI B 173.3

    This history of ANSI gives a possible origin for these warning statements on tools:
    "In 1976, ANSI and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration established a joint coordinating committee for private-public sector voluntary standards activities that affect safety and health in the workplace."

    My conclusion is that a "Wear Safety Goggles" stamp or label means that the tool was not made before the late 1970s.

    from
    https://www.bladeforums.com/threads/wear-safety-goggles-stamps-and-labels.1277000/
     
  15. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    ^^^
    That's sound about right by my recollection.
     
    Miller '72 likes this.
  16. junkenstien

    junkenstien

    522
    Feb 15, 2017
    Could it be made by Vaughan ,didn't they have an electric weld of some kind?
     
  17. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
    If this Craftsman axe was made by Vaughan & Bushnell it would have an M at the end of the second line of text in the stamp. ( It's just for the M placed here and only designates Vaughn on Sears / Craftsman tools )

    This has an FF stamp on it anyways and I have no clue who this would designate.
    The only FF stamp on record is a recent one found on wrenches...ect designating Danahar.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2018

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