Get'g more grip out of a Smooth Paper Micarta Handle?

Joined
May 26, 2005
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I have a really nice camp knife f/ Ray Laconico that is handled in smooth Black Paper Micarta and when the handle get's a bit wet it get's a bit slick.

I had been pondering the idea of stipling or checkering the handle a bit to give it more grip, but not create hot spots.

Short of a rehandle job, does anyone have any ideas?

Here are a couple pics of said knife...

R_Laconico_Camp51601.jpg


R_Laconico_Camp51602.jpg


R_Laconico_Camp51604.jpg
 
Joined
Nov 14, 2005
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11,133
Man thats a sweet blade. I like it alot!!!

Curious to the awnser, I havent had luck with sanding the paper micarta for texture.

I do have a gossman that the paper micarta was bead blasted by lonerider grips, and that helps alot....
 
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Jan 29, 2003
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That is a sweet Laconico!

I have never really found a handle material that is very secure when wet (especially in viscous fluids like blood) but also will not cause hot spots under extended use. Some materials offer one or the other or even some of both to varying degrees. However, I find that smooth handles with a good shape are the best compromise for me.
 
Joined
May 26, 2005
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Thanks guys...

I think if this handle had a bit of a swell in the palm and/or end of the grip it'd feel better and more secure. I understand the tradeoffs... of grippy vs. smooth handles.

I REALLY like this knife... but you know us junkies are always looking to make something just a bit better if possible. :)
 

Bill DeShivs

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You can create a very nice stippled texture with an electric engraving pen.
Practice on scraps first.
 
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I dunno if paper micarta can be sanded or not, but if it can be sanded id do something similar to this, please excuse my lack of drawing skills:

knifemod.jpg
 

Seals

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Oct 12, 2007
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I wouldn't suggest doing anything to such a great knife.Maybe put a stout lanyard on it that you can wrap your wrist and hand with.If you did any stippling,id just do the edges and not deep so you could polish it back out if when you wanted.
 

Bill DeShivs

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You can do exactly what you want with the electric engraver. If you decide you don't like it, the pattern can be sanded/polished off.
 

Jason B.

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How about a rat tail file?


P.S. Thankyou for not setting your knife edge down on a rock.
 
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Oct 15, 2007
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Will micarta "burn" or melt? Even just a little?

My idea is to get some screendoor wire. Take a piece and get it red hot (or real close...if memory serves correctly it goes from red to "gone" real fast...may have been a really rusty piece though) and then press it into the handle. If it works and you like it...great. If not any damage that is done can be hand-sanded out.


Maybe worth a shot? :confused:

You could always send it back to Mr. L and have him "further his magic" on it.;)
 

fishface5

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Feb 3, 2001
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what you could do, if you are handy, is take a thin bar of metal and lay it across the handle perpendicular to the blade, between two of the handle pins/tubes. Scratch in a line on each side of the bar. Now move the bar over so it is lined up against one of the scratches, and scratch another line on the other side. Repeat a couple times between each of the pins, so that you end up with several parallel lines on each side of the center pin. Then use a small round file to file the lines wider, with a round file it should be easy to keep the lines pretty identical in depth.

This is an easy way to add some grippiness yourself without ending up with something that looks like crap. the less space between the trenches, the more grippiness but also the more potential for blisters. Also you want to be careful because what gives the little trenches their "grip" is how crisp the corners are between the flat and the trench- if too round you won't add much in the way of grip, but too sharp and it will abrade your hands easily. Start out as sharp as possible and once all ar done, you can gently sand the edges to your comfort level.
 
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Aug 28, 2000
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Just cut off a 4" section of narrow bicycle intertube rubber and stretch it on (while the blade is in the sheath!)
 
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Oct 19, 2008
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Old thread I know, but just buy Tennis Racket handle tape and tape it tight.. easy to remove, and give you a firm comfortable all weather grip.
 
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Aug 16, 2008
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Perhaps you can take a small steel rod, heat it up to a glowing temp and burn in striations then re-sand
 
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Mar 14, 2007
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Sand blasting is the best way to roughen these composites. IMHO of course, it produces the most uniform finish. You can sand it, but getting a good pattern and texture is a bit of work. Since the knife if so beautiful the way it is, I think I would opt for some type of non-marking grip tape or a rubber inner tube.
 
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