got a sharpmaker, watched the video, still have a few questions

Joined
Nov 8, 2004
Messages
3
Sorry to add to the already multiple questions about the sharpmaker on this forum, but the search function here bombs when I enter more than one term, and the video left a few unanswered questions.

I remember reading warnings about the sharpmaker screwing up the tips of knives if you're not careful, but the video does not mention anything about this. What is the danger, and what do I do to protect the tip?

Sal seems to just drag the serrated edge of the blade across the edge of the triangle, does this not wear down the tips of the serrations?

Also, I will be using it primarily on a benchmade mini-griptillian, and I just want to make sure I understand all the steps.

1. attach 220 grit wet/dry sand paper to the triangles using clips and reprofile the blade to 30 degrees

2. go through the four steps (course edge, course side, fine edge, fine side) 20 times each side at 30 degrees

3. repeat above at 20 degrees.

4. just use 20 degrees to touch up the blade in the future? Do I still use 20 strokes?

The product is very solid, I'm looking forward to starting, I just don't want to screw up my knives by being too eager.

Thanks everyone.
 

Esav Benyamin

MidniteSuperMod
Joined
Apr 6, 2000
Messages
90,915
First things first. Get an old kitchen paring knife. Lightweight, good handle, probably high carbon steel blade, inexpensive ... so you will relax while doing it.

Stroke lightly and evenly down the rods alternately, and don't find yourself pressing the tip of the blade against the rod as it runs off the edge of the rod, or you will blunt the tip. As you get to the very tip, pull away from the rod, or simply sharpen only to within 1/4" or 1/8" of the tip.

Better more strokes and a light touch than fewer strokes pressing hard against the rod. Pressing hard will eventually put uneven pressure on the rod and the blade's edge, and damage both.

I have never used sandpaper clipped to the rods, only the medium and fine rods that came with the set. I really should get diamond for reprofiling.

The number of strokes needed will vary with the dullness of the knife and the hardness of the steel. Keep checking how sharp you're getting it, clean off any wire edge that forms, and you'll know when it's done.

The ceramic rods take off very little steel, especially once you realize how little work it takes to restore a good working edge. 40 degrees is an acceptable working edge for most knives. Some knives have better steel and a thinner edge already. These can take a 30 degree edge. Otherwise, only use the 30 degree to narrow the blade just above the final bevel.

Think about this: if you have a hollow ground blade, it becomes wider the higher up the blade you go. Once you sharpen the edge and sharpen and sharpen it, you wear away the steel further and further up the blade, where it is thicker. By then using the 30 degree, you remove some of that "shoulder" above the actual 40 cutting edge, re-narrowing the blade. This is a minimal but interesting situation ordinarily, and really just reduces the angle between the flats of the blade and the edge.
 
Joined
Nov 8, 2004
Messages
3
Thank you for the advice, I will plan on sharpening all my crappy knifes before I start with the good.

Esav Benyamin said:
The ceramic rods take off very little steel, especially once you realize how little work it takes to restore a good working edge. 40 degrees is an acceptable working edge for most knives. Some knives have better steel and a thinner edge already. These can take a 30 degree edge. Otherwise, only use the 30 degree to narrow the blade just above the final bevel.

When you say narrow the blade with the 30, then do the 40, is that the same as reprofiling at 30 and doing the microbevel at 40?

Thanks
 
Joined
Apr 7, 2004
Messages
97
Don't drag the tip of the knife past the stone. What I do is drag the blade past the stone until the tip is on the stone, and then drag it down the stone. This seems to sharpen the tip without rounding it, but I haven't heard of anyone else doing this way, and I am not about to set myself up as a sharpening expert. However I have to say the Sharpmaker is a great product.

Cheers, Acolyte.
 
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