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Gradpaw gave me some knives, picture heavy

Discussion in 'Traditional Folders and Fixed Blades' started by JC972, May 19, 2019.

  1. JC972

    JC972

    311
    Mar 17, 2015
    This afternoon I took the kids to see my little brother off to college and we stuck around to visit with my grandpaw that basically raised me. He gets his knife roll out and I'm using WD40 and a rag cleaning them and hopefully preventing rust. I found that a couple of his Buck Creeks were rusted real bad and the handles look like they're getting weird. I'm going at them with oil and steel wool trying my best to clean them up for him because my uncle gave them to him over the years (his son who's passed away in 2016) and just because they needed it. He says "take them home with you or throw them away, I don't want a knife that'll rust". He's always been like that. I told him that I think it's the handles gassing off or something causing all the rust. Didn't matter. He wanted me to take them. So I set them to the side and kept cleaning knives.

    Then he grabs this HUGE Remington scout knife and fiddles with it and says "This'n here's good'n smooth and its made good it looks like, it's too big for anything but my brother got it for me years ago and I don't need that thing but it's probably worth something". Same with a Camillus sailor knife with a marlin spike. I remember his brother giving them to him when I was a kid and he never did like them. They've just sat in his knife roll all these years. He has never liked a big or heavy knife.

    My great uncle was a cowboy type that rode his horse all over the mountains and cut timber until he was well into his 60's, wearing a cowboy hat and boots every day. I looked up to him a lot and it means a lot to me to have two knives he gave Grandpaw. He seemed to like big pocket knives and he used them hard. I have an old Buck 301 that he had got sometime in the mid 70's, the blades are like toothpicks and all blades wobble quite a bit but the thing is sharp. He got his money's worth out of his gear, chainsaws included. After he got up into his 70's he taught his horse to stretch out so he could get in the saddle easier. Until then I'd never seen a man that could control his horse with a wave or a nod but he did. He would dismount and walk when he thought the horse needed a rest. He was a tough old guy that was probably made of steel cable and rocks wrapped in leather but he had a great sense of humor and loved giving people things, everybody loved him. Anyway, back to today's events.

    I told Grandpaw that two of his Buck Creeks ain't rusted hardly any. He says "oh they will if them others are, take them too". I told him that my uncle had gave him the copperhead with pink swirl handles for Father's Day 2001. He said "well he's gone, who else am I gonna leave them to"? I can remember it like yesterday, him and my uncle and me sitting at his kitchen table in the old house and my uncle honing both blades on a pink medium grit stone until they were like fresh razor blades. Grandpaw carried that knife every day for a couple years after that every day. I told him not to be surprised when I round up a bunch of stainless pocket knives and bring them over but he said he didn't want that many knives anymore. It makes me worry. He has been fighting bladder cancer since my uncle died and it keeps coming back worse each time.

    Another knife is an old yellow handle Cattaraugus. It wasn't real bad but he insisted I take it anyway. It was another gift to him from his boy. While we were talking and I was cleaning his knives he was watching my two boys playing and he said "you're young enough to use all these things, and one day give them to your boys. Kinda like keeping the memory of my brother and your uncle going even though they're gone now". That hit me right in the feelings. He wouldn't hear of me bringing him a bag full of knives that wouldn't rust (easily) but I wish he would, if nothing else but to keep his spirits up through things. But i know better than to push the issue, he can get a might testy when he's pushed so if he wants it this way that's okay.

    Some of the Buck Creeks handle scales look like they're rotting or something. I'm wanting to say they're celluliod or some such material but I'm not certain. I figure I'll dump the bad ones in a bucket of oil and try to stop the rust at least. The ice handle knives have never been carried that I'm aware of. I might try to find somebody that can put wood or delrin handles on the ones that the handles are rotting on if I can get this rust issue cleaned up. If anyone knows what's going on with these handles or how to prevent it please tell me.

    Enough of my rambling, here they are.

    I tried to make the pictures not humongous, hope it worked.

    Group photo
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    The worst ones as far as rust and handle problems
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    Remington scout knife. I wonder if this is anything similar to the old Remington scout Jackknife talks about that his scout master carried?
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
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    Camillus sailor knife
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    Cattaraugus stockman
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    Buck Creek he got for Father's Day 2001
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    Buck Creek large stockman
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Fodderwing

    Fodderwing Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 31, 2017
    I like to read this kind of post. Great thing to share and I appreciate you telling it. You're fortunate to still have him and it's wonderful that you are there for him and share in his love of knives. Some cool knives to cherish. Thanks again.
     
    Jody744, orangejoe35 and JC972 like this.
  3. TX Traditional

    TX Traditional Gold Member Gold Member

    179
    Feb 7, 2019
    Great post! Thanks for sharing that. You’ve got a load of family treasure there that I’m sure will be well cared for and passed on down.

    Edit: FYI, you may already be aware of this but I was not. Search some of the posts regarding celluloid. It’s recommended that you store them separately from the rest of your knives to prevent corrosion.
     
    tmd_87 and JC972 like this.
  4. JC972

    JC972

    311
    Mar 17, 2015
    Thanks, buddy. He's 78 and fighting cancer for the third time in 3 years. Lives right next door to my mom and stepdad and 3 miles from me and my gang of rugrats. Family time is cherished to us all. Thanks for the kind words.
     
  5. JC972

    JC972

    311
    Mar 17, 2015
    Thank Y'ALL for suffering through it. I'm gonna do my best that's for sure.
     
  6. MerryMadMonk

    MerryMadMonk Platinum Member Platinum Member

    May 22, 2011
    Well said :thumbsup::thumbsup:

    JC, thanks for sharing your story. The cracked ice handles are celluloid and are outgassing. You don't want to store them anywhere near any other knives. Outgassing celluloid does a number on steel/metal of almost any kind. If they were mine, I'd remove the handles as soon as possible. And if, down the road, you want to get new handles put on, there's at least one member of this forum who is a pro.

    Edited to add: The Cattaraugus handles are probably celluloid also. I'd keep that one stored separately as well and check it for outgassing from time to time.

    Sometimes celluloid can go years before outgassing and sometimes it might only take months. But one thing I've learned about celluloid, it's only a matter of time until they start outgassing. I have a few and keep them away from everything else and check on them about once a month or two.

    Once outgassing starts, there's nothing that can be done to stop it or even slow it down.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2019
  7. JC972

    JC972

    311
    Mar 17, 2015
    I figured that might be the culprit. Next couple days I’ll try to gently pop the scales off. I appreciate you telling me that. I never thought of removing them. It’s funny because that cattaraugus has to be way older than the buck creeks. I’d imagine so anyway and it’s handles are in far better shape. But I’ll continue to keep an eye on it anyway. I plan to carry it and the pink copperhead because as of right now they’re the only ones I can open without using a dime or something to pry the blades open.
     
  8. MerryMadMonk

    MerryMadMonk Platinum Member Platinum Member

    May 22, 2011
    You're very welcome. I'd carry that Catt, too. It's a fine old knife!
     
    Getting older and JC972 like this.
  9. JC972

    JC972

    311
    Mar 17, 2015
    It’s built very sturdy. Thick blades and nice thin edges. It just feels quality that I can’t quite put into words. Funny thing though, only the Spey blade has a half stop. Both other blades don’t. I’ve never seen a setup like that before.
     
  10. abbydaddy

    abbydaddy Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 14, 2014
    That is a great story, and those are great gifts to have received.

    As others have already mentioned, the celluloid in the handles is off gassing. If you take the celluloid scales off you can arrest the damage. And then you can decide whether or not you want to have new handle scales made for/put on the knives. Rehandling might cost more than the knives are worth in terms of dollars and cents, but the sentimental value is the really important thing as far as I am concerned.

    And that Remington camp knife is a real beauty.
     
    JC972 likes this.
  11. specgrade

    specgrade Gold Member Gold Member

    397
    Nov 21, 2009
    For me, the best knives are the ones that are past down from family members. I can tell they will have a good home with you. Keep fighting the good fight and cherish what time you have left with your grandpaw.
     
    JC972 likes this.
  12. jackknife

    jackknife Basic Member Basic Member

    Oct 2, 2004
    JC, don't worry about your grandpa giving stuff away. He and I are the same age, and it's a discovery we come to, if we're lucky. I've had a few health scares, and as I got 'older' I made the discovery that material things came to mean way way less to me over the years. I got to a point that I did a giant downsizing go my stuff, guns, knives, tools, vehicles all kinds of stuff. It was the full realization that our time here is limited, and as a bonafide old fart, my time was more limited than others. That's okay, it's the way things are. When I saw how some of the family liked some of my stuff, I gave it to them. I wanted to give to to them while I was still around to enjoy seeing them use the heck out it. No matter if it was a rifle, pocket knife, camping gear.

    Sometimes we old guys make the discovery that too many possessions start to weigh us down, and it becomes a burden. At age 78, I just don't need that much stuff anymore. I kept a few good pocketknives, a rifle, a few handguns, and all the rest went. My kids, grandkids, nephews, nieces all got stuff. And I don't miss it, I can still see the stuff for the most part. The biggest thing I care about these days is the people in my life that I truly love. My family. And if I made the last train west this afternoon, I'm glad all my most treasured stuff is already in their hands, and it leaves me free of worry about stuff that in the end, is just stuff. Last year, when I woke up at 5 in the morning with sharp chest pains, the very first things I did was wake up my better half of almost 50 years to tell her how much I've loved the trip we've been on. The material things in my life had dwindled to totally unimportant at that stage. The incident passed and it was a false alarm, but it was educational. It made me do a lot of deep thinking about when I thought it was time for the big departure.

    When your grandpa tells you he doesn't want them, he's telling you true. He's at a point in life where he's re-evaluated his priorities and he really doesn't want a lot of stuff now. Things change in life and we live life by stages. The tricks, to recognize those stages and just go with them and have the grace to adapt and go with the flow. Sometimes its a challenge to recognize, re-evaluate and change as needed, but it can be done. It sounds like your grandpa has things well in hand. A good man, there.:thumbsup:
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2019
  13. Eli Chaps

    Eli Chaps Basic Member Basic Member

    Apr 20, 2018
    Thank you for sharing the story and the pictures!

    All my best to your grandpa.
     
    JC972 likes this.
  14. SteveC

    SteveC Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 13, 2017
    :thumbsup:
     
  15. Hairy Clipper

    Hairy Clipper Basic Member Basic Member

    240
    Feb 28, 2009
    JC- A wonderful story filled with nice photographs to start the morning with ... thank you for posting it! Those things handed down from previous generations are priceless whether they are physical objects or stories of the past adventures and life experiences.

    There are two pieces of free advice that I am going to pass along that might be worth exactly what you pay for them:
    1) Never turn down a gift from someone. You will only anger them and you may lose a friend.
    2) While I agree the celluloid is likely the cause of the corrosion, many gun collectors refuse to use WD-40 on their firearms anymore because it creates a patina on the metal parts. When you see patina used in a sentence read rust or corrosion.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2019
    JC972 likes this.
  16. waverave

    waverave Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Jun 7, 2018
    Very cool story and photos to share :):thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
     
    JC972 likes this.
  17. JC972

    JC972

    311
    Mar 17, 2015
    Took the pink swirl handle Buck Creek copperhead and the Cattaraugus with me when I took the wife and kids to the lake. I sat in her zero gravity chair in the shade and sharpened both. Didn’t realize I dulled them that bad using steel wool to get the rust off. No matter, they’ll both shave now. Not like after several good sharpenings but they’ll do.

    My uncle and me, we always kept any knife as sharp as we could possibly get them. I noticed once that Grandpaw would get his about just barely shaving, like a few hairs and stop. I asked him about it once and he said he used to keep them like my uncle and me but anymore he keeps em where they cut pretty good and calls it good to go. Don’t get me wrong, he keeps one sharp but he don’t go crazy getting them like scalpels.

    At any rate, these two are pocket ready now.
     
    Hairy Clipper, knowtracks and r8shell like this.

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