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Great Eastern 38s Farmers Jack

Discussion in 'Traditional Folders and Fixed Blades' started by glocktenman, Jul 30, 2016.

  1. glocktenman

    glocktenman Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    I've been interested in these knives for a little time now and even had one for a few days that I obtained to give as gift to my friend. I searched here and most of all I could find was WTT and WTS but there were a few listed in other threads about this model being a style that was impressive and surprising. Of course there were some in the what are you carrying.

    I also was doing some research on a Landers, Frary & Clark knife and was given a link to more info. What I found in that area was also interesting. They produced a similar knife to the GEC 38 farmers jack but the company died in 1965. So, these truly are traditional knives with real history behind them.

    Here's the jack made by L.F. & C.

    LF%26C New Britain Conn.jpg LF%26C New Britain Conn %282%29.jpg

    I'd like to see some more of these GEC 38s.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2016
  2. pmew

    pmew

    Oct 2, 2011
  3. glocktenman

    glocktenman Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    WOW, Thanks! I'm not sure how I missed that one as I searched farmers jack and gec 38.
     
  4. Will Power

    Will Power

    Jan 18, 2007
    Paul is correct!

    The 38 is a wonderful frame and has potential to house many configurations.The Farmer's Jack, Serp Pen with Clip master, Single-blade, Wharncliffe Pen (Northwoods version) and of course the Whittler which is a truly impressive 3 blader. Not just in terms of construction/finish but also by design. It is far superrior to CASE's Seahorse in every way - much bigger master blade and very good secondaries not some flimsy things that feel they could break off....

    The knife you showed is really interesting Randy, unknown to me and enthralling. Lyle will doubtless have one

    Here's the Cranberry Orchard Gem

    [​IMG]

    I'm very fortunate to have been able to assemble the collection of 38 Farmers I want: Orchard Gem Cranberry, Blackwood. Lick Creek Ivory Bone and Old Yellow. Just so people don't think they're sterile displays, here's my worker Lick Creek and it's a really versatile carry. I've got a Smooth Camel Bone Farmer coming in from Jamie soon, really looking forward to that one, it will be a user too I reckon.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2016
  5. glocktenman

    glocktenman Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    LOL, I was just looking at your knives in the other thread. The pic I posted is from another forum and I think it may be one of Lyles based on the other thread I just looked at.

    I really like brownish-yellowish handled one with the bar shield, UNXLD. Looks like the blade etching worked its way off!! That's pretty nice looking.
     
  6. pmew

    pmew

    Oct 2, 2011
    Like Will, I have grown to love this pattern. It's one of those where you pop it in your pocket and at the end of the day you're wondering why you ever took it out in the first place!

    [​IMG]

    I'm lucky enough to have nabbed all of Charlie's versions and one of Lyle's. I'm hoping I'll be able to find the smooth bone and that lovely jigged version both which you have Will - I've been on yet another #25 kick again so hadn't the funds for the ones that appeared on the exchange.

    Here are my four, spot the user;

    [​IMG]

    I use ceramic rods to sharpen the hawksbill and I don't know if it's my technique or the hard use the blade gets but I've noticed the point is becoming more and more rounded, much like the older versions of Lyle's and Robin's that we see in the Rooster thread.

    [​IMG]

    I really like the way the other blade is the polar opposite. Delicate and thin spey blade with that lovely sweeping deep belly that hones to absolute razor sharpness.

    [​IMG]

    Beautiful fluid shape which fits the hand very well and a selection of covers to die for. I took this jigged bone version to be a user because with the deep jigging it affords an excellent grip. Overall a great utility package.


    - Paul
     
  7. pmek5

    pmek5 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 27, 2007
    That jigging is amazing.
     
  8. r8shell

    r8shell Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Jan 16, 2010
    I bought one of the regular runs in maroon linen micarta. (it was the least expensive version) I wasn't sure if it was a knife that I'd find useful. It sat in the drawer for some months before I finally gave it a try. The little hawkbill is surprisingly handy in the kitchen, and it's fun to carry something different sometimes.

    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  9. Will Power

    Will Power

    Jan 18, 2007
    Thanks for those extra pix Paul. Grand selection you've got there.:thumbup:

    The paradox is, the knife looks odd, bizarre even, shut with that great Whale humpback sticking out.:eek: BUT, being single-spring, it is not bulky and once you open it and use the master, it feels like it was commissioned for your hand. No need for any eyesore EZ Open notches on this one:D The Pruner type blade is more than versatile: opens stubborn boxes, plastic bubble, draw cuts through any manner of stuff, slice salami, will also slice apples (not peel but I never do anyway) and has a go at more moderate sized melons, cuttings and minor pruning naturally. The other day I took a crop of courgettes (I believe Americans/Italians call them zucchini?) and some broccoli heads with ease, well it is a Farmer after all. As Paul says, the Spey is a scalpel item and a blade I usually have little interest in, but this works so well in conjunction with the master blade. I've used it to slice garlic ultra fine to mix with tomatoes and oil for a tasty pasta dish but it will shave small pieces of wood for fire starting incredibly well. Anything demanding shaving strips and it will do it, wire stripping e.g.

    At first, I just hoarded these couple of knives, falling into the trap that these are 'too nice to use' rubbish! :rolleyes: I've got a few to look at and turn over in careful appreciation, but this is enhanced by having a user to really appreciate the knife. I revel in it, great day Lyle and GEC managed to put this pattern together for people in many continents to enjoy.:thumbup:

    Regards, Will
     
  10. pmew

    pmew

    Oct 2, 2011
    Well said mate! :thumbup:


    - Paul
     
  11. RobbW

    RobbW Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 15, 2003
    I love this pattern and have assorted users in addition to the SFOs.

    My Lick Creeks. Thanks Lyle!

    [​IMG]

    My Diamond Orchards. Thanks Charlie!

    [​IMG]
     
  12. RobbW

    RobbW Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 15, 2003
    Maroon Micarta user:

    [​IMG]
     
  13. glocktenman

    glocktenman Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Are the bolsters on the maroon micarta a different metal than the others? It almost looks like a light brass color in the above pic. The ones with the bar shield appeal more to me for some reason. They all look great however.
     
  14. pmew

    pmew

    Oct 2, 2011
    The bar shield and diamond un-x-ld shield are Lyle Fry and Charlie Campagna SFOs respectively. Both utilise all steel construction of bolsters, liners and springs although I don't know what carbon steel is used but it's softer than 1095 I would imagine.

    The Tidioute models have nickel silver bolsters and brass liners as per usual GEC spec.

    Hope that helps buddy :)


    - Paul
     
  15. glocktenman

    glocktenman Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    OK, that explains the slight difference in the metals look.
     
  16. wlfryjr

    wlfryjr

    Oct 20, 2011
    The first knife is the one pictured in the initial post here. The second LF&C has the faint etch.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Charlie C once said all blades eventually wanna be a pen. Well pruners will get there,but first they become fat sheepfoots.


    It is unlikely these were made much after WWII. Most knives produced after WWII,in my opinion, were using parts in stock or parts obtained from inventories of purchased trademarks. This seems the case for most Lockwood Bros. knives.

    This pattern's heyday was before and a while after WWI, as was most knife companies. The Depression,I'm guessing,was an ending of most of their production,farming not being the principle means of livelihood,especially after WWII..
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2016
  17. Will Power

    Will Power

    Jan 18, 2007
    That jigging.....mind boggling! You are likely completely correct about the pattern's demise Lyle but it is ironic as I've found it to be such a useful USER knife in the home and garden.

    Thanks, Will
     
  18. pmew

    pmew

    Oct 2, 2011
    It's not often that something so pretty can be so hardy. A gorgeous specimen Lyle. I completely agree with my European friend's comment.


    - Paul
     
  19. wlfryjr

    wlfryjr

    Oct 20, 2011
    That is black composition on the LF&Cs,their trademark material,which I believe they called "Rubberoid".
     
  20. pmew

    pmew

    Oct 2, 2011
    It looks somewhat similar to my old mans TEW lambsfoot that he bought in the 60s. This is also some kind of black composite that looks very bone like.

    [​IMG]


    - Paul
     

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