Heavy vs Light

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Oct 20, 2006
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all specs being equal between 2 knives, except 1 is substantialy heavier than the other, which would cut easier. I say the heavier one. Any opinions?:jerkit:
 
you can't have equal specs and one knife be heavier. :jerkit:

Assuming you not including the force of gravity, they would cut the same. The perceived effort depends on what you personally expect. If for example I was cutting circles a heavier knife would require more energy to change it position thereby making it harder to cut.
 
Ok U'r right then not so equal specs, but a straight inline cut, would the heftier one direct a little more downward force naturally...its driving me crazy just pondering this, well alittle crazy anyways. Any other opinions?
 
i would not think a ounce one way or the other would much make a difference !
in therory it seems the heavy knife would cut a little better ,, but you be using more effort in doing so .
 
I think heavy would cut better, but light will be easier to handle. A compromise must be made somewhere.
 
it all has to do with physics!
Physical reaction - Defined by Newton's third law: "For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction". The idea that any given force has a pair or opposite force.
 
the axe is made to put lots of force in one small area ! The knife on the other hand will not chop as good because the blade is much lighter and longer then that of an axe !
 
physics
the more force it takes to swing or lift the more reaction yu will have i.e. more wood being removed as a result !
 
I meant heavier knife vs lighter one in a chopping competion...

Again it is swings and roundabouts. The heavier knife at equal speed will cut better at point of impact because it's momentum and energy are greater.
Of course it takes more energy and time to accelerate the blade to that speed so that part of the 'use' is harder.
Given the same force to move the blade the lighter knife will be moving faster and should cut better.
I also think the security in the hand is important and that also varies with weight.
I would also bet that in general use, 'balance' is at least as important as overall weight.
Of course if the cutting is in line with gravity the weight of the knife will always help the cut. Cutting upwards, it's the opposite.
I bet you thought your simple question would have a simple answer--if only it were so!
Greg
 
Weight of the blade is only one consideration.

Blade profile
Cross section
Sharpness
Weight
Speed

Anyone of these could be the determining factor. I put my money on Corss section/blade profile. A very acute edge and blade even dull will outchop a obtuse blade.

So if we have a Thinner Sharp Knife that is lighter by a few Onces than a heaverir blade with a thick edge The Lighter knife will win with no doubt.
 
I think that it has a lot to do with the balance of the knife rather than just the total weight. Assuming equal sharpness and geometry a blade heavy knife will cut easier than a knife that is handle heavy.
 
Clearly then a 100 ton knife cuts the best no? :jerkit:

Blade profile
Cross section
Sharpness

In this hypothetic experiment all other values are the same, he said so.
 
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