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Henkels Fine Edge Synergy Block Set

Joined
Nov 18, 2006
Messages
2,011
blockset_enlarged_img_31.jpg


I was lucky enough to receive this block set as a Christmas gift this year. Ok, more like I found the set on the cheap at Target, phoned the family and was reimbursed ;)

Overall, I'm impressed with the knives. The one thing not included that I've been meaning to buy is a Santoku knife for the kitchen.

It's amazing to me how much difference a set of good plain-edge knives in the kitchen can make, over 'bargain' serrated knives.

Anything I should know about the care of Henkels knives? Any plusses or minuses, or recommendations of a good Santoku blade?
 
There are two separate lines of "Henckels" Knives.

ZWILLING J.A. HENCKELS is their high end professional line, made in Germany. HENCKELS INTERNATIONAL is their lower end consumer line, made in numerous places outside of Germany.

Within each line, there are different grades. For example, within the ZWILLING J.A. HENCKELS line, Pro S > 5 Star > 4 Star > Twin Select. Within the HENCKELS INTERNATIONAL line, there are even more grades, with significant differences between them. IMO, the only International line Henckels grade worth considering is the "Classic". It's made in Spain from good steel and is comparable with the lower end ZWILLING line. Most of the other grades in the International line are junk made in China. The worst are the Eversharp and Everedge grades - made in China from low grade steel, stamped rather than forged, very thin, micro-serrated edge that can't be sharpened, absolute crap. The Fine Edge that you have is a middle grade from the International line.

Don't take this the wrong way, I just point it out because it's a shame that they're selling such low grade garbage under the Henckel's name.
 
Within each line, there are different grades. For example, within the ZWILLING J.A. HENCKELS line, Pro S > 5 Star > 4 Star > Twin Select.


Just so you know Rich while most of your post was correct, this bit was wrong. Each of those lines uses exactly the same blade steel and each is different only in style.


The block you got for xmas is good around the house keep them sharp and use them alot!

A santoku is a large sheepsfoot blade vegetable chopper that is good on most anything you want to chop up.
 
Just so you know Rich while most of your post was correct, this bit was wrong. Each of those lines uses exactly the same blade steel and each is different only in style.

The blade steel for the Zwillings are the same, that is correct. However, the handle materials, handle ergonomics, and overall weight balancing of the knives differ and it's reflected in the price.
 
Except for the Cermax line of knives which is made in Japan, all Zwilling J.A. Henckels you see today are made in China.
This includes the socalled higher end lines like Professional S, Five Star and Four Star.
You can also recognize these as they don't have the name of Solingen on the blades anymore.

We still sell this brand in our webshop because of customer demand, but the overall quality Zwilling had in the old days is fading rapidly.
When they come to us from the factory it's mostly very bad grinds, blunt blades, bent blades, and rounded points.
We also see quite a lot of them come back after sale with broken blades, and this is due to their SCT production process, or making a knife from three separate pieces of metal, which is not a good idea.

In the same price category there are also Wusthoff knives, they have a one-piece construction, are much stronger, have better overall design and quality control.
We almost never see any of these come back with problems, so i consider it the better choice of the two.
:)
 
My thoughts would be that for the average "home chef", these knives will be great, if treated properly.

1) Never put them in the dishwasher
2) Keep them stored in the block
3) Learn how to sharpen them when needed
4) Purchase a steel and use it after each use to realign the edge.
5) Always cut on a surface softer than the steel; i.e. wood, plastic
6) I assume that there is a 6" to 8" Chef's Knife in there somewhere. I got by for 30 years using one of those before giving it to one of my son's because I bought a Santoku (frankly I wish I had kept the heavier Chef's knife).

Have fun with your knives and remember that a sharp knife is a safer knife.
 
Except for the Cermax line of knives which is made in Japan, all Zwilling J.A. Henckels you see today are made in China.
This includes the socalled higher end lines like Professional S, Five Star and Four Star.
You can also recognize these as they don't have the name of Solingen on the blades anymore.

Are you sure about that? If so, it must be a fairly recent switch. I have a set of Zwilling JA Henckels steak knives and a block of Henckels International Classic kitchen knives that I received as a wedding present 4-5 years ago. The former have "Germany" stamped on the blades and the latter have "Spain" stamped on the blades.
 
Thanks for the replies. I'm under no illusion that the block set I found is high-end, but it sure is an upgrade from the *shudder* Ikea serrated knives that have been dishwashed and stored in a drawer with the rest of the kitchen tools.

We have a butcher block that I've sanded down and am re-oiling in the garage, so the knives will be used on a good cutting surface.

I would have loved to have these:
10643.jpg


But I figure the Henkels are a good starting place.
 
Thanks for the replies. I'm under no illusion that the block set I found is high-end, but it sure is an upgrade from the *shudder* Ikea serrated knives that have been dishwashed and stored in a drawer with the rest of the kitchen tools.

We have a butcher block that I've sanded down and am re-oiling in the garage, so the knives will be used on a good cutting surface.

I would have loved to have these:
10643.jpg


But I figure the Henkels are a good starting place.

You nailed it. I am slowly acquiring the KAI Shun Classics and replacing my Henckels and Wusthoffs. They are an incredible knife and the steel, VG10, is exceptional.

Again, the Henckels you acquired will suit you well and just start saving the pennies for the SHUN's.

Good Luck and make sure that you oil your cutting block with food grade mineral oil.

Besides, reading your profile, you have a full life ahead of you. the SHUN's will give you something to look forward to.
 
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