How does production knife makers grind the knives?

huh

Joined
Jan 2, 2002
Messages
283
I start thinking about this issue when I read an article which uses electron microscope to study carbonV and infi (sorry, can't find that article now). In the article, the author mentioned the structure of steel at busse's edge is not as good as the steel behind the edge, and guessed it's caused by the heat in grinding.

Also, the King of D2, Mr. Dozier mentioned in several talks that grinding in a low speed is critical to prevent the edge from de-tempering. And he also suggests to use extreme caution when using paper wheel to sharpen an edge. So I guess this is a very important reason contributing to the great edges he makes.

So, I am wondering how the production knife makers grind their knives. Do they have any protocols or equipments to prevent such de-tempering in grinding?
 

Gossman Knives

Edged Toolmaker
Joined
Apr 9, 2004
Messages
9,392
The major grinding is done before the blade is heat treated. The blade is left somewhat thick as to not warp during heat treat. After heat treat you do the finish grinding at low speed and keep the steel cool so you do not remove the temper. This is the way I do it as a custom maker one knife at a time. The larger production companies machine cut and grind their blades. I'm assuming in a similar fashion.
Scott
 
Joined
Oct 10, 1998
Messages
634
huh said:
So, I am wondering how the production knife makers grind their knives. Do they have any protocols or equipments to prevent such de-tempering in grinding?

Well I wouldn't say I'm a "production" knifemaker, since I seldom make 50 knives a year. All of my grinding on folder blades is done after heat treating. I do my flat grinding with the blade already in the action of the folder. I figure if my unprotectived finger can stand the heat, then the blade is safe.

A.T.

"Don't you buy no ugly knife"
http://www.customknives.com
 

ErikD

Gold Member
Joined
Dec 5, 2000
Messages
1,868
I think that the way a production compnay makes a knife would usually be to laser or water jet cut a blank, and then grind it out on CNC equipment. Then after HT it is finished by hand, or at least I remember seeing that Buck does it that way on some History Channel show. My guess would be that most other companies operate in a similiar manner, though dpending on the price of the finished product it may also be finihsed by machine.

Then there is also the whole Mid-Tech, semi-custom type of knife which is another story. I was talking to Murray Carter, and he explained to me that his Muteki lline of knives is laser cut, cold forged, and then hand ground.
 
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