How to: Lansky Sharpener

Joined
Dec 13, 2000
Messages
32
I can never seem to get a smooth edge with my lansky sharpener. I have followed the directions in the kit. It is the original with the coarse, medium and fine grit stones with the angle clamp and honing oil. The grind always seems to be uneven. Although the knife often becomes razor sharp the grind of the edge looks uneven. I was wondering if anyone could describe a method that works for them to get a nice smooth razor sharp edge.
 

glockman99

RIP Dann, you were a good guy.
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Jun 12, 2000
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Seriously? Sell the Lansky Kit, and buy yourself a Spyderco Sharpmaker. I did that myself, and don't miss the Lansky one little bit!.
smile.gif
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Dann Fassnacht
Aberdeen, WA
glockman99@hotmail.com
ICQ# 53675663
 
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The advantage of the Lansky system is that it maintains an accurate and consistent angle throughout the sharpening process. However you must first grind the bevels to one of the set angles such as 20 degrees. You do this by applying the coarse stone equally to both sides of the blade until a very light pass will push a bead to the opposite side of the blade from either side. The same process is used with the finer stones for that matter. Based on your post, you haven't done this yet so you haven't yet begun sharpening the knife. Take care.

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Fred
Knife Outlet
http://www.knifeoutlet.com
 

Lenny

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Oct 15, 1998
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The real problem with the Lansky is the clamp. It's virtually impossible to clamp the knife in t exactly 90 degrees. You'll still be able to get a razor sharp edge, but the grinds may be uneven between the 2 sides. This problem compounds itself if you are working on thicker blades. The way the clamp is machined, you can't get the jaws to be parallel to the clamping surface of the blade. Also, in trying to get the blade clamped in tight enough to prohibit wiggling as you sharpen, you may deform the actual clamp jaws as I've done. The L arms that the rods sit in are totally inadequate as far as strength is concerned. They can bend if you look at it crosseyed.
I have thought long and hard about redesigning the Lansky. First, it has to be made out of hardened steel to prevent deformation. Second, the jaws need to be wider to clamp a broader portion of the blade. This also means that 2 sets of adjusting screws are needed: forward and rearward. Lastly, and most importantly, there must be some method to allow the jaws to clamp parallel to the blade surface.
Oh, and using oil is a joke. Water works muchy better and is easier to clean up. Actually, you want as much friction as possible, so try using the stones dry. Clean them with cleanser when they feel smooth and look black.
I too will switch to my Spyderco Sharpmaker.
Any metal benders out there that want to try to make an improved Lansky with my ideas?
Lenny
 

The Magician

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Jan 19, 2000
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Glockman said it right. I had a lansky knock off, I sold it to get a real Lansky. I got a Spyderco 204. Paradise! I let the Lansky go for $10 shipped.

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Brian
"one life, one knife"
 
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Try reprofiling an edge with the 204
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I use a Gatco and it's a little better built than the Lansky.

A Henckels sharpening steel borrowed from the kitchen also.
 
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RDNZL makes the critical point. While the Spyderco 204 is an excellent example of the V sharpener, these sharpeners are only good for maintaining an edge. It isn't practical to regrind a bevel with one. If you like the V sharpener style, then the Lansky, Gatco, bench stone, powered wheel or whatever can be used for grinding and then the V sharpener can be used to touch it up between grindings. I see a lot of reasons to own both styles but a V shapener alone isn't enough. Take care.


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Fred
Knife Outlet
http://www.knifeoutlet.com
 
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Sep 3, 2000
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I've used both the Lansky and Sharpmaker systems. The problem with the Lansky, in addition to accurately clamping the blade at a true 90 degree angle, is that the radius of the grind changes as you stroke the blade across the stone.

The Sharpmaker, assuming you can keep the spine of the blade at a constant 90 degrees, seems to produce a more uniform edge angle.

For edge-formation, I use benchstones. Then I use the Sharpmaker to true the edge to uniform edge angle on both sides.

Regardless of sharpening method/machine, my final blade finishing steps are stropping with a 2-stage leather hone, using 600-grit edge prep followed by 10000-grit edge polishing.
 
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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by rdnzl:
Try reprofiling an edge with the 204
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</font>

My sentiments exactly. I have two sharpmakers and love 'em but I definitely would not get rid of my Gatco. I've reprofiled all my using knives and you would be hard-pressed to do any serious reprofiling using a 204. But the two in combination are excellent. I just reconditioned a friend of mine's buck 110 and boy was it DULL. Without the Gatco, I'd still be there with the 204.

Also, lot's of knives come with bevels too blunt to be sharpened on the 204. If you want to use the 204, you must reprofile the edge to 20 deg or less. To do the backbevel using the more acute 204 setting, 15 deg or less.


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Hoodoo

I get some pleasure from finding a relentlessly peaceful use for a combative looking knife.
JKM

[This message has been edited by Hoodoo (edited 01-17-2001).]
 
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Welcome to the forums bass! Though I can agree with the statements concerning the Sharpmaker, Fred gave you some good advice on the Lansky. It has it's place, especially for a beginner. Sometimes folks can get "elitist" attitudes about one thing or another and forget that what's right for one may not be for another. The Lansky for sure has it's faults. The uneven blade edges is one of them. As Lenny said the materials are generally the culprit. With practice though you can reduce the edge grinds unevenness considerably. I use mine mainly for small blades and users and like Fred stated, to reprofile edges of same. If you keep it I would suggest a fine diamond hone. Makes quick work of it and doesn't become uneven with use.
 

Mykl Clark

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I'm with glockman. I traded my original lansky for a shaarpmaker and trust me it works twice as well and I had the four hone diamond with ceramic extra fine. I eventually bought another Lansky (regular) used for reprofiling purposes. I don't ever use my Lansky on my knives just on other people's who go a year without resharpening there Fury knife and expect me to get it shaving sharp. Just buy a Sharpmaker 9even a 203 would be better than what you have)

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Mykl
Anxiously awaiting my BM 42A
 

Mykl Clark

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Oh yeah the used lansky I bought for reprofiling was bteel's

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Mykl
Anxiously awaiting my BM 42A
 
Joined
Jan 16, 2001
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156
alright
smile.gif
im gonna be honest... i love my lansky to death. i mean it keeps the angle perfect so you cant mess it up and it usually works great. However, i admit to knowing little about the sharpmaker by spyderco. However, it looks like one of those twin ceramic rod sharpeners and those things usually dont work for me. However, if someone could offer me more insight on how the sharpmaker is better... or how to use it .... i will listen objectively because i know lots of people like it.
 
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Dec 25, 2000
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I have a Gatco and I find that it works. The hones are larger than the Lansky and the rods are self contained in the hone and slide in and out. I have the old style all metal clamp which holds the blade very well. I also have the red hand mount which the blade clamp fits into and it works very well.I have just about every type (except Edge Pro-a little too pricy for me)of stone and sharpening device out there (yes even a coupla V shaped carbide pull throughs-don't laugh they work well on my Barteaux machete) and if it has to be super sharp or reprofiled I go to the Gatco. Make sure you clamp the blade in tight, check the angle and don't bear down too hard or yes the angle will change. Good Luck Weldonk
 
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