How to use fencing pliers?

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I was runninng some Barbed wire at my parents ranch, and I was using fencing pliers,and having a hard time figuring out what the holes in the pliers are for. They seem so purpose built, but I don't see the advantage to a certain extent, over a hammer and a regular pair of pliers. What am I missing?
 
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Well, there are some advantages, but I've also found it helpful to have a regular hammer handy too. This is the type that I'm accustomed to:
pliers-2t-1900.jpg

One, the hammer face is grooved to more consistantly drive the fence staples. Still, if you're driving into dense wood, a hammer is more effective.
Two, the "claw" portion is sized and designed for pulling fence staples out of wood. A hammer claw would have a difficult time of that task.
Three, the outside pliar portion is perfect for twisting wire without mashing.

They also have mashing and cutting ability, but no more better suited than regular pliers. It's just nice to have everything on one tool.

Just my 2 cents; I'm no expert fence builder, amatuer only.

Best Wishes,
-Bob
 

yam

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Bob pretty much said it all and your thoughts about using a regular hammer and pliers are right on. You don't "need" the fence pliers, but sometimes they come in handy. I always use a regular hammer for driving in fence staples. The nice advantage over regular pliers is the ability to grip something and use the curve to tighten things up a bit. Or to dig out an errant staple once in awhile. But for the most part, I use regular tools for my fence building. Though I think I have two pairs of these fence pliers laying around too. I grab them and some staples if it's a quick fix sort of thing.
 
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Bob pretty much nailed it :D

The slots in the side of the pliars are hard wire cutters. You can use them to cut fence wire, which pretty much destroys normal wire cutters.

The main jaws are also shaped to grip staples and pull them out of the post. If you clamp down on them just right the the tips will bite down under the head of the staple, and then you can rock them sideways like a crowbar. Sometimes the staple is seated too deeply for this, and you have to drive the spike underneath it to loosen it up first.
Or if you're trying to twist a splice or something, you can put one wire in each opening of the main jaws and turn the pliars over and over around the wire to wind them together.

I hardly ever use the pliars to drive staples though, way too slow when you're working on a locust post.....I prefer my 28 oz framing hammer for that part :D
 
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We always used the claw made by the very end of the pliers to twist the wire clips around the wire that was used to hook the wire to the T-posts.
 
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My fencing plies don’t have the claw on the back, but the top is shaped a little different so you can grab the staple. More important that the plies, what are you using for a fence stretcher?
 

yam

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To stretch the fence tight, I use two pieces of 2x4 cut to 4 feet each, c-clamped to either side of the end of the fence, wrap two tie-downs around the boards, then attached to and pulled with a come-a-long which is of course secured to something solid like my tractor, a tree, or truck trailer hitch. It sounds more involved than it really is. Takes less than 10 minutes (or there abouts) to setup.
 
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yam said:
To stretch the fence tight, I use two pieces of 2x4 cut to 4 feet each, c-clamped to either side of the end of the fence, wrap two tie-downs around the boards, then attached to and pulled with a come-a-long which is of course secured to something solid like my tractor, a tree, or truck trailer hitch. It sounds more involved than it really is. Takes less than 10 minutes (or there abouts) to setup.


I am thinking that he means single strand barbed wire. Interesting tip though because I will be stretching some field fence soon, so I will try your method.

I use this tool
http://catalog.mooremaker.com/viewProduct.cfm?item_id=393339

My girlfriend had the ratchet style fence stretcher and I couldn’t get the wire tight enough for me without it breaking. With the Moore Maker tool and a good come-a- along I can get the wires tight enough to where I have to start watching my corners which are railroad ties stuck in the ground 4 feet and cross braced
 
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Dijos said:
I was runninng some Barbed wire at my parents ranch, and I was using fencing pliers,and having a hard time figuring out what the holes in the pliers are for. They seem so purpose built, but I don't see the advantage to a certain extent, over a hammer and a regular pair of pliers. What am I missing?



The jaws can grip the wire & you can use the rolling cam pick end to add tension to the wire before nailing it with the hammer. If you're working alone,use your hip to hold tension.
Too,my pliers are a bit different & very old. Family had cattle on the Outer Banks in the late 1800's until about 1920.
Sorry I lack the expertise to send a photo.


Uncle Alan
 
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yam said:
To stretch the fence tight, I use two pieces of 2x4 cut to 4 feet each, c-clamped to either side of the end of the fence, wrap two tie-downs around the boards, then attached to and pulled with a come-a-long which is of course secured to something solid like my tractor, a tree, or truck trailer hitch. It sounds more involved than it really is. Takes less than 10 minutes (or there abouts) to setup.

We've always done about the same. Only we've got a couple oak slabs that are actually 2"X4":D and about 5 ft long, that are predrilled with bolt holes to match up with each sqaure in the wire (woven wire fencing). By running a bolt through each square top to bottom and drawing the boards down, it keeps the fence from slipping anywhere and giving an uneven stretch.

For barb wire, we have a special tool thats used to hook onto the fence and let you stretch it.
 
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boy this thread brings back fond memories of stringing fence in a creek bed with no breeze and mosquitos buzzin' in august in central texas, there is nothing quite like it imho.
 

yam

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Matt Shade said:
We've always done about the same. Only we've got a couple oak slabs that are actually 2"X4":D and about 5 ft long, that are predrilled with bolt holes to match up with each sqaure in the wire (woven wire fencing). By running a bolt through each square top to bottom and drawing the boards down, it keeps the fence from slipping anywhere and giving an uneven stretch.

For barb wire, we have a special tool thats used to hook onto the fence and let you stretch it.


True dimension lumber, man we don't see that too often anymore do we? I just basically cobbled together some stuff from what I had on hand. The reason I use two tie down straps is so I can adjust them for an even streeeetch. I put one near the top and one near the bottom of my clamped boards, then hook them to the one hook on the come-a-long. Even everything up, stretch, rinse and repeat. :)

I tell you what though, I'd rather put the fencing on than dig the fence post holes. Even with an auger it can be a pain. I use -5/8 dirty gravel to lovelingly pack each fence post in, which I are about 16" deep on 8' centers. The gravel provides good drainage and makes a nice secure post. One tool that'll be needed is one of those long steel rods with one tamping end and one chisel-like end. Helps to really get the material packed in around the post.

I'm just glad it's not me puting up more fencing. ;)
 
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