1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

  2. Click here to enter the drawing for your chance to win a Kizer Sheepdog & Ka-Bar Dozier Folding Hunter, , Bladeforums.com swag or memberships!

    Be sure to read the rules before entering, then help us decide next week's giveaway by hitting the poll in that thread! Entries close at midnight, Saturday August 10!

    Once the entries close, we'll live stream the drawing on Sunday, July 28 at 5PM Eastern. Tune in to our YouTube channel TheRealBladeForums for a chance to win bonus prizes!

    Questions? Comments? Post in the discussion thread here

I.D. Help--Ever See This Mark?

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by FortyTwoBlades, Mar 16, 2015.

  1. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    [​IMG]

    It's on a scythe blade and looks like the crown may have been stamped over "Oakland, ME" but the surface pitting and low quality of the stamping makes it difficult to tell. I'm wondering if this has ever been seen on related tools, like axes (often axe and scythe companies were the same, especially in the Oakland region if that is really what it says.) I've simply never seen this marking before.
     
  2. BG_Farmer

    BG_Farmer

    556
    Mar 13, 2014
    Did you try rubbing with chalk? That sometimes helps.

    PS looks distinctly English.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2015
  3. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    Did so just now and it confirmed my suspicion that the text is an over-stamped "OAKLAND ME"--the crown just covers the O, A, and most of the K. But I can't find any references to an Oakland manufacturer with a name that would be appropriate with this stamping. The closest I'm finding is John King & Cyprian Roy, but that would be odd because King and Cyprian are last and first names respectively, so why the crown with a C instead of an R...? Makes me think it may not be them, especially given that records indicate that they operated under the name "King & Roy".
     
  4. BG_Farmer

    BG_Farmer

    556
    Mar 13, 2014
    Cool. With the crown, I was thinking it might say "England", but Oakland it is!
     
  5. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    Yeah it's definitely not an English blade! :D
     
  6. M3mphis

    M3mphis

    Jan 13, 2011
    Baker, Sanford J.** Oakland 1898
    Tools Made: Scythes
    Remarks: Tom Lamond (personal communications) notes that Sanford J. Baker of
    Oakland has Pat. No. 615,518, Dec. 6, 1898 for a scythe. It is shared with John King, also
    of Oakland.

    From: http://www.davistownmuseum.org/PDFs/Vol_10_Registry.pdf

    Maybe that will be helpful, who knows!
     
  7. M3mphis

    M3mphis

    Jan 13, 2011
    There are so many Kings!
     
  8. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    Already looked through that whole list. None of the Kings in Oakland have an association with the letter C other than King & Roy, but that seems to fit about as well as hammering the wrong piece into a jigsaw puzzle. :D

    I've written the Davistown Museum in the hopes that perhaps they have an idea.
     
  9. Steve Tall

    Steve Tall

    Aug 28, 2010
    My guess is that these blades were bought from an Oakland maker by a hardware distributor (perhaps named Crown Hardware, which would explain the logo with the Crown and the C).

    There's online evidence of several Crown Hardware companies, including this one in Connecticut:

    "Crown Hardware Mfg. Co., New Haven, Conn., has been organized by... to manufacture hardware and kindred metal goods."
    from Iron Age, 1932
     
  10. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    That's what I'm leaning towards as well. The typeface and text of the stamping most strongly resembles that used by Emerson & Stevens, though the overall form isn't distinctive enough to tell for sure.
     

Share This Page