I LOVE me some Hook... I mean... STRIPPERS

Discussion in 'Busse Combat Knives' started by Bottom Line, Feb 10, 2019.

  1. jay drews

    jay drews

    164
    Feb 24, 2018
    so regular old paint stripper wont hurt G10 or canvas scales? Do u soak the whole knife or just use a rag and wipe it on? I find this interesting
     
  2. Bottom Line

    Bottom Line Gold Member Gold Member

    533
    Oct 24, 2017
    Jay, get you some Citistrip at a big box store, lather it on and let it set for a couple hours. I've had some colors strip quicker than others.
     
  3. Hard Knocks

    Hard Knocks Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 1, 2012
    Yep, don't worry about removing the scales. I haven't had any issues with canvas, g10 or res-c. These were stripped and bead-blasted, although I had better luck with Jasco than I did with citristrip. Wear some safety glasses, you don't want that stuff, even a speck, getting in your eyes. Gloves are a good idea as well.

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  4. clampdaddy

    clampdaddy Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 31, 2013
    Oh, man. That Choppy is sexaaay! Did you blue it or did the steel just take that gray color on its own?
     
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  5. inkynate

    inkynate

    Sep 4, 2010
    I went with Citristrip for the lower toxicity factor, but it can take either multiple applications or some extra elbow grease to scrape off the coating. One tip I picked up here somewhere is that warming up the Citristrip some on the blade with a hair drier or heat gun helps it along.

    A couple more dirty girls:

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  6. lex2006

    lex2006 Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 20, 2014
  7. clampdaddy

    clampdaddy Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 31, 2013
    Yeah, warming it up definitely helps. Easiest strip I ever did was in the middle of summer. Put the knife in a black garbage bag, sprayed it down with citristrip, closed it up and left it out to bake in the sun all day. The coating practically fell off.
     
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  8. Hard Knocks

    Hard Knocks Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 1, 2012
    Just wiped it down with mineral oil after the blast. I really like the way it made the hamon pop.

    Thanks for the tip on warming up the citristrip fellas. I was not having much luck with it even after several coats.
     
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  9. clampdaddy

    clampdaddy Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 31, 2013
    Yeah, that hamon really stands proud. I dig it!
     
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  10. co556guy

    co556guy

    Dec 13, 2011
    I'm with you OP! I love stripped blades.

    So far:
    BGTG
    Hog Badger (infi)
    511
    Rodent 6
    DS6
    I still need to do some sanding on the hog badger (I'm polishing it...slowly). I polished and reprofiled the 511 and love it that way.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2019
    Bottom Line likes this.
  11. PeteyTwoPointOne

    PeteyTwoPointOne Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Jun 10, 2014
    Stripper with a tramp-stamp...don't get no betta ;)
     
  12. PeteyTwoPointOne

    PeteyTwoPointOne Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Jun 10, 2014
    Next time, don't neglect treatin yoself to sum hardcore grinding with your stripper...why not?... she's paid for...

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    Last thing.... keep it classy bro >>> put some pants on her after you're done...

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  13. back_inthe_saddle

    back_inthe_saddle

    129
    Jul 5, 2018
    Why does Busse HAVE to coat it in the first place? Why can’t we request NO COAT? It’s one less step and less cost for Busse. Less work for collectors stripping them. This always mystified me but was afraid to ask.
    I had no problem requesting that Dave make my sheaths w no drain hole.
    Some of the stripped blades do look great. Even better than comp or satin
     
  14. PeteyTwoPointOne

    PeteyTwoPointOne Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Jun 10, 2014
    Reason #1...some hogs actually LIKE painted blades

    #2...it would at first blush appear Busse could save $$$ by skipping coating blades, but also consider the naked blades would have to be ground/sanded to a higher grade finish...costing more floor time + materials...that's why all makers <not just Jerry> charge more for Satin finish-- and even more $$$ for high polish.
     
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  15. back_inthe_saddle

    back_inthe_saddle

    129
    Jul 5, 2018
    If Busse released blades just before the coating process it would look bad but then all “strippers” would have to do is sand/buff them. So it would save stripper fans the paint stripping step. And from what I’ve just read in this thread, it could be quite a task. Maybe Jerry thinks he might lose credibility doing it that way.:eek:
    And so if you only stripped the paint, revealing the original naked surface, it looks so bad that sanding and grinding is necessary to get it looking presentable or as good as some of those pictured above. Ok. I get that. But some stripper fans mentioned that some blades that were only stripped (no sanding, etc.) look better than others and need little or no treatment afterwards. Just depends on the model? This really is another new (to me) and fascinating aspect to the whole Busse mystique. So far I only have two coated blades and I’m not crazy about them. Too thick and stimpled(?). The first Busse I bought is an exception, a very thin black coat on my Steel Heart 2 (A2) I don’t think it’s paint. The rest of them are comp and satin.
    Anyway, thanks for replying Petey :thumbsup:
     
  16. PeteyTwoPointOne

    PeteyTwoPointOne Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Jun 10, 2014
    No problem.....:)

    Yes some blades are near pristine under the makeup...but it's kinda a crapshoot.

    And yes, some models seem to be a better gamble. It depends a lot on the grind. Full flat, full convex, zero convex and similar grinds by their very nature require more primary grind work and consequently get more of the surface uglies erased.

    NMSFNO's and NMFSH's are generally pretty safe bets.

    Heavily CNC'd models usually have a minimum of uglies also-- such as my beloved HG55 patterns.

    Models with sabre grinds or hollow grinds that retain a heavy spine or expansive flats, as a rule, are subject to less intense work on the primary and sometimes retain a lot of what hogs call "grinder gremlins," "chatter marks," and the occasional pit. Specimens that have these minor cosmetic glitches seem to be the prime candidates for painting, as you'd imagine.

    Painted ASH-2's, Hucks & Fins, BB13's, Ratweilers, Chopweilers sometimes see this cosmetic issue if you strip em.

    Regardless, of what they look like under the paint, they're fun to strip <IMHO> and you still retain Busse's best in the biz warranty...so have at it if you have a model you wanna strip!

    a gremlin, like a worm groove, on the flat of a TGLB
    [​IMG]

    curious chatter marks
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    a small pit
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    Last edited: Feb 16, 2019
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  17. dogboye

    dogboye Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 23, 1999
    I think all the blades come out of heat treat with that carbide stuff on them. Treat that chemicAlly, then apply paint, then clamp the handles, and you’re done. Well, sharpen. But anyway, that carbide stuff will rust like a bitch if not either coated or removed. I believe if you didn’t either paint or grind the entire blade, then it would literally rust to the point of structural failure under the scales. That would be unacceptable to me. And every one I’ve stripped still had the layer of paint under the scales to protect the carbide stuff. So I completely understand why they either cost everything, or charge extra. It costs them extra in labor and time if they don’t paint.
     
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  18. Busto

    Busto KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jul 26, 2011
    It's NOT Carbide....It's Decarburization where under High Heat Treating, Carbon molecules are released and migrate to the Surface of the steel and when Quenched form a hardened "Plaque" which can either be Coated or Must be removed since it is High Carbon and easily open to Flash Rusting.....Blades not being coated reflect the additional labor to grind off the Decarb layer...And I can verify that Stuff IS HARD to remove it eats up grinding belts AND the Blade has to be Kept COOL during this grinding with either a water cooled grinder or dunking the blade every pass or two so you don't damage heat treatment on cutting edge.
     
  19. dogboye

    dogboye Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 23, 1999
    Thanks, Busto. I couldn’t remember the right term, for some reason. Decarb is a mutha of a rust magnet. I’ve seen it rust terribly even in a climate controlled environment.
     
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  20. back_inthe_saddle

    back_inthe_saddle

    129
    Jul 5, 2018
    Thanks for the info, but I think I’ll stick with comp & satin finishes.:D But keep the discussion going. Great stuff!:thumbsup::cool:
     

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