Info on Siska

Joined
Jan 27, 2002
Messages
2,038
Does anyone here have contact info for Jim Siska, and any idea what his waitlist might be? What a maker, and his grinds just make me dizzy!

Sincerely,
Anthony C. Paulin
 
Joined
Aug 8, 2003
Messages
1,050
6 Highland Ave.
Westfield, MA. 01085

Phone 413-568-9787
Fax 413-562-6341

siskaknives@aol.com

I got mine from him early last year, and I had to wait about 8-10 months. Here is a pic.
standard.jpg
 

SharpByCoop

Enjoying the discussions
Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
Joined
Oct 8, 2001
Messages
12,293
Jim Siska knows a little bit about 'flow'... :eek:

Coop
 
Joined
Jan 27, 2002
Messages
2,038
Thanks for the info! I'm just looking for a simple B&T with that killer high grind recurve blade that Jim can do- That is SWEET! It looks like its going about 100 mph just sitting still. Anyhoo, Thanks!

Sincerely,
Anthony
 
Joined
Nov 20, 2001
Messages
7,350
BTW, does anyone know if there's a connection between Rados & Siska, like one taught the other or something? The knives seem to have similar DNA... It's also the case of knives by Michael Veit (whose work I only know from the Weyer books).
 

Kohai999

Second Degree Cutter
Joined
Jul 15, 2003
Messages
12,554
But I am fairly certain that neither studied with the other. Jim Siska has his own style, he has for years. It evolves, but is always "Siskaesque". I own two of his knives, and they are spectacular. I finally convinced him that he is an artist this year, he defined himself as a craftsman.

Jim has a good full time job, and he is loath to give it up. He makes knives when he can, he can put a few out per year, less than 100, for sure. His realistic wait time is about 18 months to 2 years. If you want one of his knives now, best bet is to go to a show that he attends, or buy one from an internet purveyor. There is a reason that they carry his work, and it isn't 'cause his is a really nice guy, even though he is.

Rados has more of a "traditional" New England Style, in that I mean that his knives are not always distinguishable as Rados knives. His great gift lies in his damascus making skills. His Turkish Twist is worth its weight in gold, IMHO.

Michael Viet was making his own Turkish Twist, and hot bluing it in starting in the late '80's-early '90's. The use of Turkish Twist is the only similarity to Rados that I ever noticed. Michaels's style was closer to David Broadwell or Ron Gaston, IMHO.
Best Regards,

STeven Garsson
 
Joined
Sep 17, 1999
Messages
602
Steven:
You are right about Jim being an artist. I have bought several of his knives since 1989 and have watched his work evolve . Anyone who buys one of Jim's knives will appreciate it more and more and time goes by. Just my opinion.

Marcel
 
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