Inlay Adhesive Resilience

Discussion in 'Chris Reeve Knives' started by sailfish, Dec 26, 2019.

  1. sailfish

    sailfish

    322
    Jan 1, 2019
    After work at the end of the week I typically wipe my micarta inlay Sebenza down with paint thinner, degreaser, or alcohol. Sometimes it makes me wonder though, just how resilient is the adhesive method for the inlays? From what I believe they use some kind of 3M industrial double sided tape? I know it's supposed to be pretty tough stuff but has anyone ever had any experience with the bond weakening for whatever reason?
     
  2. aengina

    aengina

    144
    Jul 25, 2010
    Just don't submerge it in solvents and you should be OK.
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2019
  3. sailfish

    sailfish

    322
    Jan 1, 2019
    That was kinda my thought. I wouldn't think that simply wiping the surface of the knife would ever get down inside the inlays enough to cause an issue like that but you never know.
     
  4. marthinus

    marthinus

    Dec 10, 2006
    The product is 3M VHB. You can do some Googling on it. Interesting product
     
  5. Don M

    Don M

    818
    Apr 30, 2000
    I wonder about the effect of paint thinner or other solvents on the adhesive. I don't know how to check that other than by contacting 3M. Even if it can't easily get under the inlay, over time with repeated application it might.
     
  6. nyefmaker

    nyefmaker Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 29, 2008
    The 3M tape CRK uses is the best of the best. I used it for years at another job. I used some to attach molding trim to a vehicle. It was still on there 10+ years later and never came off. The vehicle was never garage kept and was out in the elements all that time and never washed. ( wasn’t my vehicle....lol. ). But it’s good stuff. I would stick to the least evasive cleaner.
     
  7. sailfish

    sailfish

    322
    Jan 1, 2019
    I happened to do a little more reading on VHB. It does have solvent and chemical resistant qualities. It also seems to be even tougher stuff than I originally thought. The inlay bond will probably outlast the blade. 3M apparently knows what they're doing.
     
  8. BellaBlades

    BellaBlades Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 12, 2013

    I've used it as well in manufacturing. Worst case. Epoxy would be a permanent fix.
     
    pxl likes this.
  9. kidcongo

    kidcongo

    Jan 12, 2013
    People are sometime too paranoid about Sebenzas. My Micarta 21 stayed soaking wet for two weeks on a camping trip. I wash it in the sink, and use windex on it if the inlays need cleaning. No problems. Water does not affect the VHB tape. I would not leave the knife sitting in paint thinner, but water is no issue.

    Chris Reeve designed threes knives to work (hence the name). People treat them as more precious than they are.

    For sure, if you have a nice graphic or a wood or mammoth inlay you treasure, keep it in a velvet-lined safe, and that’s fine. But a plain-Jane or Micarta inlayed Sebenza is meant to be rough handled. I heap a good amount of use/abuse on my wood inlayed CRK knives as well and also no issue, though the wood does dent and scratch more easily than the Micarta, which is basically bulletproof.
     
    Dcdavis likes this.
  10. sailfish

    sailfish

    322
    Jan 1, 2019
    My Sebenza definitely gets its share of work, hence the need to clean in it with industrial solvents. My concern was more the effect of those cleaning agents on the bond between the two materials rather than the materials themselves.
     
    kidcongo likes this.
  11. Barry H

    Barry H

    Nov 3, 1999
    I've replaced several sets of inlays when I used to do service work. Nothing works better than a heat gun and the tip of an xacto blade to lift out the inlay. You should not have any issue lightly using mineral spirits or denatured alcohol to get gummy residue off your knife
     
  12. 353

    353 Basic Member Basic Member

    Feb 20, 2015
    I don't think the OP wants his inlays to come off..
     
  13. Barry H

    Barry H

    Nov 3, 1999
    I realize that. I phrased my reply to say that occasional cleaning with solvents will not affect the adhesive tape.
     
    353 likes this.
  14. 353

    353 Basic Member Basic Member

    Feb 20, 2015
    Ah, I misread, gotcha!
     
  15. sailfish

    sailfish

    322
    Jan 1, 2019
    Micarta or wood? And what got them to the point they needed replaced?
     
  16. BellaBlades

    BellaBlades Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 12, 2013
    What do you do that requires industrial solvents? I use my knives for most things. But most of the time studies show dish soap and water is about as good as it gets. Then alcohol for surface cleaning.


    Otherwise I'd Reccomend NO inlays.
     
  17. RTedder2

    RTedder2 Gold Member Gold Member

    105
    Oct 21, 2015
    Tim told me as long as I don't constantly submerge it in acetone it'll be fine
     
  18. BellaBlades

    BellaBlades Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 12, 2013
    Is your avatar Burt Reynolds in a Batman suit?
     
  19. sailfish

    sailfish

    322
    Jan 1, 2019
    Alcohol usually works but at some point I've had paint, drywall putty, pipe dope, refrigerant, oil, roof tar. That's just off the top of my head.
     
  20. Barry H

    Barry H

    Nov 3, 1999
    They didn't "need" to be replaced: The owners wanted different material/

    WD-40 or Goof-Off is a pretty decent choice for removing most crude without disrupting the 3M adhesive tape. Denatured alcohol and lacquer thinner are better for dried paint. If you use solvents, apply to a rag and wipe till crude is off. Do not submerge knife handles in a container of solvent.
     

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