Introduction, and 3D Printed Prototype Of My First Knife (pic heavy)

Discussion in 'Custom & Handmade Knives' started by Atakdog, Mar 6, 2016.

  1. Atakdog

    Atakdog

    190
    Sep 3, 2012
    To start out, I will formally introduce myself for the first time on this forum: My name is Kellen Bogardus, and I am 18 years old. I am currently attending college in Massachusetts studying physics and mathematics, but I am originally from Oregon.

    I have been a knife collector for a few years now. I have never had a huge collection and have only ever owned a little over a dozen knives, so when I get a knife I use it thoroughly and really get a sense of what I like and don't like about it. With this and as my knowledge of materials, edge geometry, and manufacturing increased I began to think about what I would want if I designed my own knife.
    I began to think about this more and more seriously and about a year ago finally sat down with a pencil and paper and sketched out my perfect knife. After a week of sketching, erasing, and a lot of thinking for several hours a day I came up with this:

    [​IMG]

    It's nothing unique, but that's because I wanted something that I knew would be functional, and because I generally like what is on the market right now. I wanted a slim 4" bladed folder with a classic blade shape and no more handle than needed for it to fold into.
    Anyways, after that life got too busy to go any further, but I knew a paper sketch wasn't going to be enough. So, about six months ago I downloaded a CAD program, put a photocopy of this sketch in it as a template, and began designing. I had barely done any 3D design when I started so I learned as I went and it took way longer than it should have, but through a lot of revisions I ended up where I am now. I had always thought it would be cool to have it 3D printed and have a functioning prototype, so I designed it to fit hardware from my other knives. However, I recently got access to a 3d printer so I loaded the files and five hours later ended up with this.
    [​IMG]
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    [​IMG][​IMG]
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    [​IMG]
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    It took a decent amount of sanding to get it functioning (the holes were all a bit small and I had to remove the support structure for the blade and bearing pockets) but now it locks and opens reliably. The pivot, bearings, stop pin, detent screw, and lockbar stop are from a ZT 0560, and the rear screws are from a Spyderco Southard.
    This file is only of my printable version, I have a newer version copied off of this file that has a lot of little changes such as internal milling of the handles, improved lock and stop pin geometry, steel lockbar insert, space for a 1/4" pivot and up to .59" diameter caged bearings, etc.

    Specs:
    -4.10" blade length (3.75" cutting edge)
    -5.00" handle length
    -.53" handle width
    -3.8oz (with internal milling on both sides, ~5.2oz without)
    -3.5mm blade thickness
    -4.5mm handle thickness

    The unfortunate thing about this is that right now I am not a knife maker, only a designer. I won't be able to make these myself for at least several years. I only have access to a small shop with some drill presses, a bandsaw, a lathe from the '30s, and a cheap manual mill from the '50s. I bet some guys can work with that but I'm not confident that I can. Plus, I'm a full time college student and varsity athlete, so I don't exactly have a lot of time or energy on my hands.
    So, besides just to show all of you something you might think is cool, the point of this post is to see if there is enough interest in this design to have someone else make it through a collaboration. If any makers out there are interested in this design feel free to send me a message. I don't know how collaborations usually go but I won't ask for much; basically as long as I get one or two for myself I'm happy. If no one is interested then at least I know I provided all of you with an example of the cool stuff you can do with 3D printing.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2016
  2. Kohai999

    Kohai999 Second Degree Cutter Platinum Member

    Jul 15, 2003
    It really looks a lot like a ZT0450.
    [​IMG]

    Best Regards,

    STeven Garsson
     
  3. 808busa

    808busa

    1
    Mar 7, 2016
    That's pretty sick, very nice
     
  4. LX_Emergency

    LX_Emergency KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jun 28, 2007
    That was my first thought too.
     
  5. Atakdog

    Atakdog

    190
    Sep 3, 2012
    I did take some influence from my ZT 0454 and 0452cf because those are my two favorite knives, but I still tried to change it to be original. I'm not trying to copy anyone, there's just so many different designs out there it's really hard to make something original and I tried to make it as unique as possible while making sure it was still good design with every aspect thought out. The more advanced version does stray a bit farther from the design in various places though, especially the mechanics.
     
  6. Lorien

    Lorien KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Dec 5, 2005
    exactly.
     
  7. chuxwan

    chuxwan

    423
    Aug 26, 2012
    Very cool. I like the idea of prototyping with a 3d printer and you've done it well here. I think the blade could use a little more weight visually for me to see the knife as balanced.
     
  8. tom mayo

    tom mayo

    Jan 27, 1999
    Really?
     
  9. timos-

    timos- KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Oct 22, 2012
    heres the thing ive found about designing knives. Dont use other knives as inspiration. Start with free forms, pencil and paper with intended use/purpose in mind. That is how you will get yourself something unique. With that being said, putting that model together like you did is no easy feat especially when you are teaching yourself. Well done.
     
  10. AntCaps

    AntCaps

    909
    May 6, 2009
    I like it, I know what you mean about so many designs it's hard not to resemble another. Every time I draw something in auto cad within seconds I can see 2 or 3 other models in it or at least I know the maker that inspired it. I love the 3D printing prototyping I'm a big fan of using the newest technology to improve one of the oldest tools.
     
  11. Atakdog

    Atakdog

    190
    Sep 3, 2012
    Thank you for the advice, that's closer to how I was trying to design it than it looks. Explained briefly, I started with a pivot point and an edge profile and then designed the blade to support that edge and have a good point, then decided where I wanted my fingers to be on the handle in relation to that and went through many slightly different versions before coming out with what you see. I remember spending six hours sketching, erasing, and sketching again the single line that forms the profile of the top of the handle alone. Also, when I say I took some influence form a current design I didn't think "How can I make a version of this that doesn't look like a ripoff?" but instead thought along the lines of "How can I achieve the function that this knife or this feature on a knife does with these other changes or intended uses that I have in mind and design it to do that in what I believe to be the best way possible". Because of this I think it is a unique design and can go on for pages about why every feature is put in a certain place and designed in a certain way.
     
  12. timos-

    timos- KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Oct 22, 2012
    understood. now you just need to make it:D
     
  13. Kohai999

    Kohai999 Second Degree Cutter Platinum Member

    Jul 15, 2003
    It isn't "easy" per se to create an "original" knife, but there are design elements that completely brand a maker's work....yes, even now.

    Cory Martin is working on something less than his 10th knife, there is a WIP here in this S/F, and it is EASILY identified as an original design with unique elements.

    My good friend Tom Mayo posted up here, and his TNT knives are uniquely branded and this was definitely done at a point when much of the knife design world was saying it had all been seen and done before, probably around 2000-2001 was when I saw my first TNT.

    Tim Johnson's advice is very good and very real. Regardless of what you set out to do, you clearly created a knife strongly influenced by Dmitry Sinkevich's designs.

    When learning new skills, better to straight up copy the masters(Buck 110, CRK Sebenza, Spyderco Police.....) and learn the skills to correctly interpret those designs and then start to create new designs.

    This has been the classical way to learn art and design skills since the dawn of the paintbrush/Photoshop, and there is probably no reason, other than ego or laziness, to think that you can improve upon this method.

    Best Regards,

    STeven Garsson
     
  14. Atakdog

    Atakdog

    190
    Sep 3, 2012
    Alright, I've thought about it a lot and have to admit that, although it wasn't my goal, the design looks too much like Sinkevich's work and out of respect to him I am in the process of changing various elements of both the handle and blade right now. I'll post new CAD screenshots when it's done.
     
  15. Atakdog

    Atakdog

    190
    Sep 3, 2012
    These are my changes, things I have thought about doing with the design but ended up liking the other version more. It is a bit of a rough version of the changes but what do you guys think so far?
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  16. Lorien

    Lorien KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Dec 5, 2005
    looks pretty damn awesome.
     
  17. ddd

    ddd

    Apr 6, 2003
    Hello Kellen,
    welcome to the BladeForums!

    I sent you a message through this Forum... (See on the Header of the page)
    Could you email me your response?

    All the best,
    David Darom (ddd)
     

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