I've busted one of the clip torx screw of my Paramilitary 2... help.

Discussion in 'Maintenance, Tinkering & Embellishment' started by Chapp, Dec 5, 2019.

  1. Chapp

    Chapp

    112
    Mar 28, 2018
    I tried to unscrew the clip of my Paramilitary, but one of them was locked TIGHT. I've a bunch of torx tool, but I had to force a lot. It's a T6 torx crew, it's smallish. By trying too hard, I've busted the screw, the torx lines doesn't work anymore, the torx screwdriver doesn't work anymore, it just slip.

    Is there a solution for that ? I can't send it to Spyderco, I live in Europe and that would be too expensive.

    In general, I always wondered how do you unscrew a screw you busted. Is there a general tips for that ?
     
    bucketstove likes this.
  2. danbot

    danbot Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 31, 2009
    If it isn't loose enough now to wind out with a pick, it will need to be CAREFULLY and precisely drilled out.
    ETA: a screw extractor might be worth a shot (if you can get one that small) and it still needs a shallow pilot hole to use an extractor.
    If it doesn't work, it needs to be drilled out.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2019
    115Italian and Sigsog226 like this.
  3. JJ_Colt45

    JJ_Colt45 Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 11, 2014
    you can get micro grabits or micro easy outs if the screw head is still in tact they should work ... just be careful and deliberate.
     
    115Italian, Sigsog226 and danbot like this.
  4. Sigsog226

    Sigsog226 Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 3, 2013
    I was thinking a screw extractor as well. And also agree that drilling it out is the next best option. Sometimes with screws in general you can file a slot to use a flat headed screw driver, but with those tiny screws it probably won't work. They are too delicate, especially since a torx didn't work.
    And the only other thing I can think of right now is to find some screw extraction pliers. They make small ones that might be able to bite onto such a small flush screw like that.
     
  5. jeepin

    jeepin Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 20, 2003
    Possibly a small pair of needle nose vice grips.
     
  6. Danke42

    Danke42

    Feb 10, 2015
    I would look for someone local like a small machine shop and be prepared to also sacrifice one of the scales as part of this.
     
  7. JJ_Colt45

    JJ_Colt45 Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 11, 2014
    if you want pliers for that use I highly recommend VAMPIRE TOOLS Vampliers ... they are as good as I've ever used for busted screw removal ... and come in various sizes.
     
    Chris "Anagarika" likes this.
  8. Chris "Anagarika"

    Chris "Anagarika"

    Mar 7, 2001
    I have used it successfully on many Byrd’s torx T6 clip screws as well. Get the mini version, it will ruin the circumference of the dome but it works!

    The only thing is that the screws have to be protruding above the surroundings.
     
    JJ_Colt45 likes this.
  9. Chapp

    Chapp

    112
    Mar 28, 2018
    Looks very nice, but the price is expansive. They're also hard to find in Europe. 60€ for removing a screw on a 130€ knife is too much for me.

    Sacrifice a scale of a 130€ knife to remove a busted screw Spyderco locked VERY tight for whatever reasons ? No thanks.

    I'm not sure I'm confident enough to not fucking it up. Can I just use a dremel to make a flat incision and try to remove it with a flat screwdriver ?
     
  10. Chapp

    Chapp

    112
    Mar 28, 2018
    If I'm confident enough to try it, how should I do it ? I take a drill with the same size and I carefully bust the screw with my drill ? Like going in until the drill is completely eradicated ?
     
  11. danbot

    danbot Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 31, 2009
    You will need a drill that is a little smaller than the tap drill size, so for a T6 screw, I think that would be a #4-40 tap, so I would go with a #45 drill bit (0.082"). You need a nice rigid set up and get the drill bit as close to being on center of the screw as possible. Then, easy does it! Peck drill into the screw until you are through. The remainder of the screw that is in the threads should come out easily.
    Probably best done on a milling machine, but you could do it on a decent drill press if you are careful and have a nice set-up.
     
  12. Danke42

    Danke42

    Feb 10, 2015
    Well you can always make it worse then.
     
  13. Danke42

    Danke42

    Feb 10, 2015
    I wonder if a machine shop would have a drill press or mill.

    Probably not in Europe.
     
    danbot likes this.
  14. COSMO

    COSMO Gold Member Gold Member

    382
    Feb 13, 2005
    If the screw failed during normal operation of removal would that qualify the knife for a warranty repair by Spyderco? If so it may defer your costs in mailing it to them and get you back a knife that isn't scarred up. Conversely attempting to fix it yourself may not only fail but also put you in a position where you cannot ask for a warranty repair. I would contact Spyderco and see what the options are before taking a tool to the night. Just my two cents. Cosmo
     
  15. Sigsog226

    Sigsog226 Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 3, 2013
    You could, but I would make that a last ditch effort for that tiny screw. You get way more torq/pressure/control with a torx bit then you do a flat head. So if it didn't even loosen with the torx driver, the flat head is just a hail Mary kind of idea.
    If it goes wrong then half of the screw head could snap off.

    I also have a set of Vampliers which is what I was referring too. They do a really good job. But are pricey. There is also another brand called engineer I think? They are green handled instead of red. It is the same company out of Japan, just different marketing name, and they tend to be about $10 cheaper then the Vampliers.
     
  16. Chapp

    Chapp

    112
    Mar 28, 2018
    Problem solved. Here's what I did :

    I took a metal saw, I sawed a flat head insert on the screw and I just used a flat-head screwdrivers.

    Pictures of the final results :

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Worked like a charm. 15 minutes of time because I did it carefully to not hurt anything else on the knife. I went very lightly. My saw was very big too, so I had to be careful. With a small saw or a dremel, it should be easier and faster.

    The screws was tight, TIGHT with some kind of solid loctite, if not just glue. Even with that flat-head insert, I had to force a lot. I love this knife, but why Spyderco ?

    I'm glad it's done, I tried many things. Speaking about it publicly helped and motivated me to solve the problem for good, that's always a good thing.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2019
    jux t and danbot like this.
  17. drail

    drail

    419
    Feb 23, 2008
    Gunsmith tip - if anyone runs into a screw like this then your next move should be - do not try to force it. Assume it is Loc-tited and carefully apply some heat to the screw head with a 40W soldering iron. Loc tite compounds melt with just a little heat applied and will then unscrew. Don't leave the soldering iron on the screw for too long if there is any kind of polymer/plastic under it. Once the screw loosens turn it out quickly before the Loc tite cools and rehardens.
     
    jux t, woodysone, 115Italian and 2 others like this.
  18. Chapp

    Chapp

    112
    Mar 28, 2018
    Yeah, that's the tip I came across the most - to heat up the loc tite. I did. I tried to heat it with a hair dryer, with a heat blower, by diping the knife in boiling water... Nothing worked and I suspect that Spyderco just used some glue for whatever reasons, instead of loc tite. The screw was very, very tight and it's the first time, in my knife life, that I had this problem.
     
    razor-edge-knives likes this.
  19. drail

    drail

    419
    Feb 23, 2008
    Hair dryer, heat gun and boiling water are not going to produce sufficient heat to melt Loc tite. And you only want to apply heat to the screw and nothing else. The heat will flow into the screw and into the Loc tite and not damage the scales but your timing is crucial. Be ready with the screwdriver and keep trying to loosen it as you heat the screw. A soldering iron is the proper tool (40 watt or less).
     

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