karambit

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Aug 7, 2005
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I'm looking for a nice looking karambit (I don't really like the spyderco), but I'm not ready to pay 150+ for an Emerson, any ideas?

I like the way Cold steel's FGX karambit looks, but I would prefer some steel to that plastic thing.
 
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Oct 13, 2003
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If you're planning on getting a folding kerambit, I seriously recommend you buy the best one you can afford. The last thing you want to happen is have the lock failing on a cheap kerambit and closing a crescent shaped blade on your fingers!

The cheaper kerambits do intrigue me, but I prefer to keep my fingers. I did play guitar once.
 
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spyderco kerambits can be had in the ~$80 range FWIW, and are the cheapest ones i would get.

FWIW i dont like kerambits myself, i had the tarani master model and the best thing about it was how easy it was to get my $$ back out of it lol, lots do like them though.
 
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have you seen ...

pentagondefense_1878_49080840
 

Planterz

Іди на хуй Путін!
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That's not a kerambit. Looks like a Fred Perrin La Griffe style knife (unlicenced knockoff?).
 
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Even though it is fairly cheap and has not gotten a lot of good reviews I purchased a S&W keraambit with handle scales (as opposed to the frame lock)- just to have a folding kerambit in my collection to see what I like and dislike with the folder. AS you want one that looks nice I will assume that it will not be EDC'd or really used much. If this is true and the knife works for you it may be a choice- it looks good to me and I paid only $40 Canadian for it. Might be a good stasrting point- just be sure to look at as many models as you can- the one I bought locked up solid but others at the store were of poorer quality.

Good luck
 
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I don't really understand the advantage of the karambit...I get that it's used in some martial arts...but I just don't get the practicality...anyone care on enlightening me?
 
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For me it's just to add to my colelction, I already have a Camillus heat as EDC and it's ok.

I also looked ate the Tom Anderson's Valkyrie, same type of blade, and I found a place where they sell it for 5$ (must be really cheap :p)
 
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The Valkyrie that you are talking about is most likely a Frost or the like product from his design. My girlfriend and I have 2 Franklin Hawgs that are the same type. Just look for quality in the one that you choose- some are well made.
 
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The advantage of a karambit is in close quarters. The ring and handle shape create a virtually impossible scenario for disarms by the opponent. The small crescent shaped blade, double sided (perferrably), compounded with a slightly curved handle and just off center hole placement allows for deep, pulling cuts with great leverage in a small knife. It easily slips in and seperates joints , hooks bones, cuts ligaments and tendons while aiding throws, locks and others maneuvers while maintaining a relatively small profile, and in a manner a straight knife cannot, even if larger. Further, the hole, if properly placed and made, aids in striking and compulsion grips or skin tears should the blade not be employed.

Frankly, a significant portion of the knives I've seen offered here as karambits are not karambits; they are ring handled knives with a wharncliffe or claw style blade-- some are merely double-sided daggers with a ring handle. Nothing wrong with that, but it shouldn't be called a karambit. Personally, I see no sense in those either. But it's a matter of taste there. However, same as a lion shouldn't be called a tiger. Similar, but certainly not the same.

The curving of the handle and blade, the placement and shape of the ring on the handle as well as the placement of the tip of the blade in relation to the handle and ring are all very important and defining of a karambit style. There are variations, but fall within a proportional range and if you learn to train with one for its intended purpose, the shape(s) and proportions become obvious.

That said, there are also very large karambits (up to 15" or more blade length) which have specific uses, but the typical one has a blade 2"-4" in length. Filipino arts use a karambit well, but the birthplace of the karambit, in Indonesia, utilize the karambit more fully in my not-so-humble opinion. Also, there are some makers on this site that make an excellent karambit. A couple aren't my personal style, but they are well made karambits nonetheless. Some others make an excellent ring-handled knife. :D

Oh yeah, folding karambits make me extremely nervous as the back of the blade is used quite often. A very well made one I might carry, but never one as a liner lock.
 
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cybrok said:
I'm looking for a nice looking karambit (I don't really like the spyderco), but I'm not ready to pay 150+ for an Emerson, any ideas?

I like the way Cold steel's FGX karambit looks, but I would prefer some steel to that plastic thing.

I have some good news for you. Cold Steel is making all of the Nightshade knives with Aus8a steel and kraton handles. The Karambit blade will be Aus8a steel and the handle will be Grivory overlapped with kraton. They will be available for sale in the spring catalog which comes out in May. Hopefully they have them all in stock by March instead of backordering them.
I called and spoke to Miguel, who is in charge of the customer service department and he confirmed this.
 

HoB

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Artfully Martial said:
I don't really understand the advantage of the karambit...I get that it's used in some martial arts...but I just don't get the practicality...anyone care on enlightening me?

Try to handle one. They are pretty much self-explanatory once you hold one in your hand. They are nasty little buggers but being untrained in MBC it would be my choice of a SD blade. It seems practically impossible to attack someone holding a Karambit and not suffer sever injuries to hands and forarms. Latest on the pullback you are going to slice something open real bad.
 
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2katana said:
I have some good news for you. Cold Steel is making all of the Nightshade knives with Aus8a steel and kraton handles. The Karambit blade will be Aus8a steel and the handle will be Grivory overlapped with kraton. They will be available for sale in the spring catalog which comes out in May. Hopefully they have them all in stock by March instead of backordering them.
I called and spoke to Miguel, who is in charge of the customer service department and he confirmed this.


I thought the Nightshade series was ColdSteel's lineup of 'airplane knives' eg, non-metallic blades! :confused:
 
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Nov 3, 2003
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TrentKTS said:
The advantage of a karambit is in close quarters. The ring and handle shape create a virtually impossible scenario for disarms by the opponent. The small crescent shaped blade, double sided (perferrably), compounded with a slightly curved handle and just off center hole placement allows for deep, pulling cuts with great leverage in a small knife. It easily slips in and seperates joints , hooks bones, cuts ligaments and tendons while aiding throws, locks and others maneuvers while maintaining a relatively small profile, and in a manner a straight knife cannot, even if larger. Further, the hole, if properly placed and made, aids in striking and compulsion grips or skin tears should the blade not be employed.

Frankly, a significant portion of the knives I've seen offered here as karambits are not karambits; they are ring handled knives with a wharncliffe or claw style blade-- some are merely double-sided daggers with a ring handle. Nothing wrong with that, but it shouldn't be called a karambit. Personally, I see no sense in those either. But it's a matter of taste there. However, same as a lion shouldn't be called a tiger. Similar, but certainly not the same.

The curving of the handle and blade, the placement and shape of the ring on the handle as well as the placement of the tip of the blade in relation to the handle and ring are all very important and defining of a karambit style. There are variations, but fall within a proportional range and if you learn to train with one for its intended purpose, the shape(s) and proportions become obvious....




Can you name a knife that is a real, kerambit. Any reasonably priced ones?
 
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Nov 3, 2003
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TrentKTS said:
The advantage of a karambit is in close quarters. The ring and handle shape create a virtually impossible scenario for disarms by the opponent. The small crescent shaped blade, double sided (perferrably), compounded with a slightly curved handle and just off center hole placement allows for deep, pulling cuts with great leverage in a small knife. It easily slips in and seperates joints , hooks bones, cuts ligaments and tendons while aiding throws, locks and others maneuvers while maintaining a relatively small profile, and in a manner a straight knife cannot, even if larger. Further, the hole, if properly placed and made, aids in striking and compulsion grips or skin tears should the blade not be employed.

Frankly, a significant portion of the knives I've seen offered here as karambits are not karambits; they are ring handled knives with a wharncliffe or claw style blade-- some are merely double-sided daggers with a ring handle. Nothing wrong with that, but it shouldn't be called a karambit. Personally, I see no sense in those either. But it's a matter of taste there. However, same as a lion shouldn't be called a tiger. Similar, but certainly not the same.

The curving of the handle and blade, the placement and shape of the ring on the handle as well as the placement of the tip of the blade in relation to the handle and ring are all very important and defining of a karambit style. There are variations, but fall within a proportional range and if you learn to train with one for its intended purpose, the shape(s) and proportions become obvious.....
Can you give an example of a real one? Any good ones that are reasonably priced?
 
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Artfully Martial said:
Is the mighty emerson karambits worthy of the attention?

My wallet said no :p


What I'm looking for is something that looks like the Cold Steel FGX karambit, but in steel.
 
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Jun 8, 2005
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I like the Spyderco Karambit alright, but the blade is at such a radical angle relative to the handle it looks wrong and reallllly hard to use for anything. The point, after all, is pointing at ME. Darn. I wouldn't mind picking up a little karambit to play with...

C84_L.jpg


Gotta be a folder though...

I just need something less radical. And if these are intended to be combat blades, might as well go with G10.
 
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Artfully Martial said:
I don't really understand the advantage of the karambit...I get that it's used in some martial arts...but I just don't get the practicality...anyone care on enlightening me?

Steve Tarani is an advocate of the karambit, and he provides quite a bit of information here:

http://www.karambit.com/

Depending on the design, the karambit can be held blade forward with the pinky going thru the finger hole. It can also be held in an ice pick grip with the index finger in the hole.

Now, before I proceed, let me assure you I do not claim to be a karambit expert. However I have seen videos of folks who know how to use this knife, and I am impressed.

The karambit can also be "twirled" by virtue of the finger ring, but they way I understand, it should done only by experts if used in a real SD situation. It's only rotated 180 degrees, btw, in order to extend the reach of the blade, and not more than that. Anything beyond a 180 degree rotation increases the likelihood that: a) the blade will fly out of your hand, b) you'll end up sticking the sharp pointy end into some part of your body, or c) all of the above.

Karambits have been made in different sizes, shapes, and bends in the blade. As mentioned earlier, some knives are sold as karambits only be virtue of the finger hole. Another design, sold by Spyderco, displays a blade with an angle almost perpendicular to the handle. The Tarani design falls in the middle with a blade roughly at a 45 degree bend relative to the handle.
 
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Tarani is a good practitioner with a solid background-- mostly the late Mad Herman Suwanda's Mande Muda Pentjak Silat, and he has also trained with some of the same folks I have.

While you can hold the karambit with the hole at the pinky, and in some instances it may be beneficial to do so, the most common grip which allows the wielder to take advantage of the shape and leverage afforded by the peculiar characterstics of the karambit most of the time is with the forefinger in the hole, blade down. With the pinky in the hole, blade forward, it is usually referred to as the "reverse karambit" grip.

The twirling of the karambit is for dexterity and handling drills and IS NOT advisable in an actual self-defense encounter except in very specific and extreme situations. Some of what is shown about the karambit is not a system based on the karambit, but the karambit was introduced into a system that already exists and made to fit in. It shows. If someone is twirling a karambit in front of me menacingly, or attempting to use it in that fashion, I "may" take a shallow cut or puncture, but I will be holding their karambit in my hand properly for use, and it won't be in that fashion.

There are certainly varying sizes and shapes, but a karambit, by its nature has a curve in the blade; some radically as in the "cock's feather" or rooster tail blade, and some just barely enough to be called a karambit. Sometimes the handle appears to be, or may be straight, but when holding it in relation to the blade it becomes apparent that the leverage afforded by the handle and blade angle is there for proper use. In some rare instances, a hole is not even there, but then the blade angle and handle curve is usually more pronounced. The Arabian jambiya is considered by many historians as the father of the karambit.

The Spyderco karambit is one of the best production folding designs I have seen for a karambit thanks to Warren Thomas, the designer. The "radical" appearing angles you see is on of the reasons why it is an excellent and proper karambit. When it is in your hand with the ring and handle firmly gripped, you will understand that G-10 or steel for grip security doesn't matter.

I like Tarani's design as well, but am unsure of the lockback's strength. I had one and sold it. I'm quite sure the all steel framelock design is much stronger physically than the ordinary lockback design. There is much use of the back of the blade in SD. In a folder for the karambit design I'm much more worried about strength issues than grip security if properly designed, and they both are.
 
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