Keepin' It Sharp!

Joined
Jan 26, 2001
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43
Okay, so my CUDA is on it's way. Now I need something (idiot proof) to keep it sharp. I've been looking at the Lansky Diamond System (that way I can tell my wife that I'm buying her a diamond
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). The few times that I have tried just using a stone, it was disasterous. I'd like to do this one right! Whadda ya think?
 
Joined
Mar 3, 2000
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If you want to keep it sharp, it's simple: don't use it!
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Just kidding. The simplest way to keep it sharp is to get a sharpener with ceramic "wheels" (I don't know how to call it). It's simple, you get very fasdt a sharp edge BUT it won't be uniform,it won't last long, actualy it's the worst edge possible.
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The best will be to learn how to use the sharpening stone. All you need is a cheap $5 knife to practice on it. A regular stone plus a white (fine) synthetic one will do the job. Just keep the stone on a flat surface and "cut" very fine sections (imagine that you have a fish and you are making very fine fillets) alternating the sides of the knife every now and then. Start with the regular stone and when the edge is almost done, switch to the synthetic one. Just keep the angle kinda uniform. You will get the move if you try a few times. Experience will tell you when to alternate sides. When the edge is "almost there", you can do a few light moves on the synthetic stone "spine first" to be sure the edge is straight. All you need to use on your stones is water, don't mess them with oil.
That's just my opinion, I hope it helps.
 
Joined
May 9, 2000
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Actually, sometimes you will have to sharpen your knife as soon as you get it. Knives do not always come sharp.
I like the Spyderco Sharp Maker to sharpen and the Gatco Tri-Seps to keep in my pocket for touchups.

Keith.
 
Joined
Jan 6, 1999
Messages
605
I personally would recommend the Spyderco Sharpmaker 204 over the Lansky System.

It is faster/easier to set up and is as close to idiot proof as anything on the market.

------------------
AKTI Member No. A000370
 
Joined
May 13, 1999
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I have both the Sharpmaker 204 and the Lansky, and the Lansky sits in it's box on a shelf, while the Sharpmaker is on my coffee table, seeing use almost every day. I do break out the Lansky for major edge mods, but for sharpening, the 204 is where it's at.
 
Joined
Jan 26, 2001
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Sounds like the Sharpmaker 204 is it! How do you get your wife to let you keep it in the living room? I slipped up on time when she came home early and caught me cleaning my gun on newpaper in the living room. My hospital stay was lengthy!!!
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Thanks for the help, anymore opinions?
 
Joined
Sep 29, 2000
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I'm the one descenting opinion on sharpening. My opinion is this: there is no easy AND low cost way to sharpen knives. Either you develop lots of skill or you spend money. Everything in-between is a compromise.

The Sharpmaker is nice when the angle is right, otherwise it can take hours to reprofile your knife. (I did this a couple of times on the Sharpmaker - chewed up 2 evenings per knife!).
 
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Apr 10, 2000
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Donno about proofing, but I vote for Edge-
Pro. That's the best IMHO.
I have DMT benchstones, Spyderco 204 and the EdgePro. If I want a really sharp and especially polished edge there's no better & faster way to get that except Edge-Pro
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It will take forever to do anything serious with it. In other words it won't do it.
DMTs are just fine, fast & efficient, I am very glad with them, if you like free hand sharpening, that's another good choice
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.
Spyderco is fine for touchups, but for everything else it just waaay tooooo slowwwwwwww... Another disadvantage with 204 is that fixed angle. While it's ok on kitchen knives most of my knives I sharpen have different angles, not that 30/40...



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zvis.com
Have Fun,
Alligator
 
Joined
Aug 18, 1999
Messages
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What Keith said. If you get a knife with an edge greater than 20 degrees, you will kill yourself trying to sharpen it with the 204. A Gatco or Lansky will solve that problem for you. Or even a good flat stone or diamond hone. But once the angle is 20 or less, the 204 is ideal.

------------------
Hoodoo

I get some pleasure from finding a relentlessly peaceful use for a combative looking knife.
JKM
 
Joined
Apr 29, 2000
Messages
128
Start with this:

http://www.razoredgesystems.com/

(It will help you learn angles and technique)

And then progress to total free-hand. Take it up as a hobby of sorts. The rewards are worth the time and effort!
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------------------
Champions make improvements as fast as losers make excuses.
 
Joined
May 6, 2000
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358
What is the best way to sharpen the serrations on smaller knives?

I have tried triangular stones with no success and most of those "ice pick" shaped sharpeners are too big a diameter for many of the smaller serrations.

Thanks.
 
Joined
Aug 31, 2000
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There's alotta 204 fans in this house
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..........Where's Comrade Chang with the EdgePro advice when you need him?
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Personally, my experience is limited to Arkansas bench stones to which I haven't been able to exactly perfect my technique yet.(If you know what I mean)
I want to eventually purchase an EdgePro and a Sharpmaker. I'll use the SM for touch-ups and the EP for serious regrinds and repairs. I'll also use a strop (Hand American...maybe??) between sharpenings and also after.

Come on Chang.......where are 'ya buddy??
I miss your sharpening tips and advice.

--The Raptor--
 
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Aug 31, 2000
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One more thing,
I just purchased a copy of "The Razor Egde Book Of Sharpening" by John Juranitch.

I have heard so many good things about this book that I just had to have it. Many forumites have posted that it is a virtual "Bible" for knife sharpening techniques.

--The Raptor--
 
Joined
Jan 26, 2001
Messages
43
Okay, so where do I get info on the Edge Pro and Gatco? Champion, thanks that looks like a system worth considering. Hope I don't end up like I have with holsters. I have a box full that I bought before I figured out which ones worked best for me.
And now that I think about it, "Where is Chang"?
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Joined
Sep 3, 2000
Messages
100
I have both Sharpmaker and Lansky System, and haven't touched the Lansky for a long time.

When re-profiling an edge, I use free-hand bench stones for edge-formation, and the Sharpmaker to establish true edge angles.

Final edge treatment is 2-stage honing with leather hones, using 600-grit and 10000-grit abrasive powders for final edge polishing.

The nice thing about the Sharpmaker is that the only 'skill' required of the user is to maintain the blade vertical while stroking the stones.
 
Joined
Jan 26, 2001
Messages
43
Okay, so where do I get info on the Edge Pro and Gatco? Champion, thanks that looks like a system worth considering. Hope I don't end up like I have with holsters. I have a box full that I bought before I figured out which ones worked best for me.
And now that I think about it, "Where is Chang"?
confused.gif
 
Joined
Nov 6, 1999
Messages
2,639
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by bad4u:
...When re-profiling an edge, I use free-hand bench stones for edge-formation, and the Sharpmaker to establish true edge angles.

Final edge treatment is 2-stage honing with leather hones, using 600-grit and 10000-grit abrasive powders for final edge polishing.

The nice thing about the Sharpmaker is that the only 'skill' required of the user is to maintain the blade vertical while stroking the stones.
</font>

The only thing you forgot, bad4me, was that Knowledge and Understanding are also skills that must be practiced. You obviously know what you are doing while sharpening knives. But using a Sharpmaker without understanding what you are really trying to accomplish will not do the job as well as the tool is capable.

Sharp(maker) advice: Keep the blade upright and vertical, and your mind, open. Look, listen, and feel, and everything will turn out right in the end. It may take a while a first, especially if the edge needs to be re-angled (profiled). Remember that tools are only as good as the mind that is using them.

Paracelsus

 
Joined
Jan 26, 2001
Messages
8
i use a ceramic plate to do the touch up on my knife. its a thin plate about 8x8 sqaure and works wonderfully. only takes a few passes to restore the edge and the edge does last and is very sharp.
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Esav Benyamin

MidniteSuperMod
Joined
Apr 6, 2000
Messages
90,915
The Sharpmaker is a great system, and it packs into itself in a box the size of a kid's pencilcase. Hide it in plain sight; it won't get in the way.

The Gatco tri-seps is about the size of a small folding knife itself. It's a triangular ceramic bar with rubber tips to help you keep a good angle, or just a grip on it.

It's a good idea to do a little research on this question. Check out the FAQ on sharpening, and then do a search, read few good threads. Then get the Sharpmaker (Bayou Lafourche has a nice price http://www.knifeworks.com/) and read the booklet and watch the video.

If you have an old battered knife, especially a stainless steel one, you may want to use a diamond hone first, and that's just going to lead you down the path to really having to know what goes on at the blade's edge. Good luck!
 
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