Keeping Old Hickory handles rot free?

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Oct 26, 2005
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There's tung oil, linseed oil, multi coat super glue finish, and I'm sure there are others.
 
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Peter_E_Ryt said:
There's tung oil, linseed oil, multi coat super glue finish, and I'm sure there are others.

As Old Hickory knives are generally used in cooking (I think), these may not be suitable. Chicago Cutlery made an oil for their handles which was composed of food grade mineral oil with some Vitamin E (to prevent oxidation=rancidity). I used it for years and still use it on my knife block.
 
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The day to day usage in the kitchen, with the natural oils from your hands, is all that is needed.
 

RokJok

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Camellia oil (sometimes called tea tree oil) is another food-grade oil that you can use for kitchen cutlery. Some oriental cuisines use it as a food ingredient.

It's available at online woodworking suppliers like Misugi Designs, Japan Woodworker, and Hida Tools. You should also be able to find it at sword supply shops, since it is used on Japanese katana blades.
 
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This might sound extreme but ya' could lacquer them.Good advice above.
 
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I have both old, 25 years plus, and new, 6 months, Old Hickory knives. The wood on the old ones is fantastic stuff. The new ones is pretty awful. No idea what it is though.

I took steel wool to the new ones. As fine as I could go. Really smoothed them out. Then warmed the wood by placing in the oven at 125F for half an hour. Brushed them with vinegar, this made the grain stand out. Polished the wood with 2,000 grit automotive paper. No this didn't make them overly slick.

I then treated then with the left overs of a rifle stock refinishing kit I had. (most likely tung oil) They look a lot better for sure and are holding up well so far.
 
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Danish oil has worked well for me on wooden knife handles. It sort of seeps into the wood and hardens. It takes awhile to dry, but you virtually never have to treat the wood again.

Boiled linseed oil is easy to apply. It may darken the wood over time, but it looks cool. Linseed oil followed by a coat of paste wax makes a very nice finish.

I’m personally not a big fan of tung oil. It can stay sticky for a long time, in my experience.

The simplest route to take would probably be to use mineral oil. You can just dab a bit on some cloth, rub the handle down, and you’re good to go. You don’t even have to wait for it to dry at all.
 
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