1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

  2. Click here to enter the drawing for your chance to win a Kizer 1034A1 Gingrich Bush Knife & Ka-Bar Dozier Folding Hunter, , Bladeforums.com swag or memberships!

    Be sure to read the rules before entering, then help us decide next week's giveaway by hitting the poll in that thread! Entries close at midnight, Saturday Sept 7!

    Once the entries close, we'll live stream the drawing on Sunday, Sept 8 at 5PM Eastern. Tune in to our YouTube channel TheRealBladeForums for a chance to win bonus prizes!

    Questions? Comments? Post in the discussion thread here

Ken Onion Work Sharp and scratched blades

Discussion in 'Maintenance, Tinkering & Embellishment' started by Daddyo16, Jan 5, 2014.

  1. Daddyo16

    Daddyo16

    Jan 12, 2012
    Does anyone who uses the KO Work Sharp find that your satin blades get scratched when pulling them through the edge guide? At first I thought I was using too much downward pressure, but it also happens when I do what is recommended and let the weight of the blade supply all the downward pressure.

    I'm hesitant to use it on my more expensive blades until I figure out how to avoid it.
     
  2. aquaman67

    aquaman67

    Jan 27, 2012
    I'm not seeing how plastic is scratching your blade. Is there something else on the inside of the guide?
     
  3. Officer's Match

    Officer's Match Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 23, 2013
    Grit and metal from the blade will accumulate on the guide. When I use the guide, I use it for a visual reference without letting the blade touch it. I find I'm also in better control of the blades contact to the belt that way.
     
  4. Daddyo16

    Daddyo16

    Jan 12, 2012
    It doesn't make sense to me either, but there's nothing else making contact with the blade.
     
  5. Daddyo16

    Daddyo16

    Jan 12, 2012
    That makes sense and is something that hadn't occurred to me. I guess fine metal particles can do a number on polished metal. Thanks for the insight.
     
  6. Officer's Match

    Officer's Match Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 23, 2013
    I like to use the side of the belt that's moving downward (off the edge rather than into the edge) and I put a damp paper towel in front of the machine to catch the off-fall. The rougher grits really move some metal.
     
  7. Bimjo

    Bimjo

    101
    Oct 3, 2001
    You could put masking tape on the blade while you're sharpening it.
     
    Biochemdawg likes this.
  8. Daddyo16

    Daddyo16

    Jan 12, 2012
    Would that prevent the buildup of the metal dust?
     
  9. Officer's Match

    Officer's Match Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 23, 2013
    I would reduce the chance of scratching.
     
  10. Bimjo

    Bimjo

    101
    Oct 3, 2001
    Probably not, but it should keep it off the blade while you sharpen it. Put the tape on, sharpen, remove the tape. No scratches. You could use a small vacuum near the bottom wheel to keep the dust level down during sharpening if it's a really big problem for you.

    I just got my KO and have only used it once so far, but I noticed that the level of dust is directly proportional to the grit of the belt and how much metal is being removed. Finer belt and touch-ups on blades previously sharpened on the KO will generate less dust than a coarse belt used on a knife for the first time, especially if you are lowering the included angle.

    Once you get the convex edge established, keeping it will be much less messy. YMMV of course, depending on what/how you're sharpening.
     
  11. Officer's Match

    Officer's Match Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 23, 2013
    Exactly^

    I also think that sharpening on the "up" side of the belt is where the most dust accumulation is occurring. By only using the "down" side and a damp paper towel like I previously posted, less will occur since you're sharpening below the guides contact and trapping the dust with the wet paper towel.
     
  12. Donald B.

    Donald B.

    3
    Jan 30, 2019
    My few knives that I have done so far have fine linear scratches. At first I thought it must have been on the blade to start with, since I did not check the old knives very closely when I started using the sharpener. I think they are coming from the guide. In the comments someone mentioned that it may be fine metal particles on the plastic guide, which makes sense. From this point forward I will be taping the blades. I have tried this on a couple of knives and this seems to work OK.
     
  13. muslmutt

    muslmutt

    20
    Dec 7, 2017
    Taping the blade works. Getting the Blade Grinding Attachment works much better. I will never go back to the guide. The BGA is easy to use, does not scratch like that, and I can get my knives sharper with it. I regret wasting as much time as I did and scratching a couple nice knives with that guide.
     
  14. Donald B.

    Donald B.

    3
    Jan 30, 2019
    Thanks for the input. I will look in to this attachment since it is a pain to have to tape the blades when you sharpen. $89 seems a bit steep in addition to what I have already paid, but I sure like the edge this machine puts on the blade. Interesting, none of this was mentioned in the demo I watched at the outdoors show. Don, Sacramento
     
  15. Bill3152

    Bill3152

    234
    Nov 27, 2018
    I have it but don't use. Just curious if the belts are the same size if anyone knows for the blade grinding attachment. Thanks.
     
  16. Donald B.

    Donald B.

    3
    Jan 30, 2019
    I just ordered the Blade Grinding Attachment. The web site says the belts are 1” wide, which I think is wider than the belts on the basic KO grinder.
     
    Bill3152 likes this.
  17. Haffner

    Haffner

    160
    Feb 13, 2007
    They are wider and longer.
     
    Bill3152 likes this.
  18. Bill3152

    Bill3152

    234
    Nov 27, 2018
    Many don't use the $130 tool (not including belts) as it is. I think it's important to specify this to guys looking to buy one. As the cost goes up to over $200 not including belts. A slow speed grinder or slow speed belt sander is a lot less. And has other uses than just sharpening knives. There are belt angle guides as well that can be bought for a belt sander. If I had to do it again I certainly wouldnt buy it. I didn't know this before otherwise I would have saved the money. Belt sander have many many other uses as well. Just my .02 cents. If you want to advise someone about using one make sure you tell them about the scratched knives and the extra attachments.
     
  19. muslmutt

    muslmutt

    20
    Dec 7, 2017
    Donald B., IMHO it was worth every penny of the extra $ the Blade grinding Attachment cost. It took my sharpening beyond the next level, it is more fun, and brings a much greater sense of satisfaction.
     
  20. Sonnydaze

    Sonnydaze Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 6, 2009
    I got the KO sharpener and, while my wife was away one day, sharpened all of her kitchen knives. It did a great job and didn't scratch any of the many knife-blade surfaces.
     

Share This Page