Kershaw ET 1900

BaliBowler

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Sep 2, 2005
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1,297
I was considering picking one up as an edc, ive been carrying my benchmade 41mc balisong around but i feel pretty outrageous whippin out a bali to open a package in public, there fun but not for edc. but they are fun and this looks like a pretty cool knife and a good edc, i have no problems learnig how to open it, i pretty much mastered the bali. i would get the blk serated ver. can you guys tell me about it in terms of sharpness, quality, ect. i mean if nothing else its pretty cheap:D
 

Thomas W

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Oct 11, 2005
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5,710
bali,

It sounds like you are good with your hands when opening and closing a non traditional folder.
The E.T. has similarities to the bali-song in the fact that most folks have difficulty opening and closing the piece out of the box. I really don’t think this a bad thing, as it makes the user work the knife outside of their comfort zone, challenges applied technique, and encourages the user to train and get fluent with their hands.
It really does take someone who is familiar with the knife (bali-song or E.T.) to share opening/closing knowledge, and then the user has to put in the time. Those of us who have come to put in the hours with a bali-song, master the multiple ways to manipulate the design, and appreciate the knife for what it is. Most don’t put in the effort, and their skills never graduate to more than a novice, voyeur level. When the beginner sees the bali-song in all its potential, they instantly are drawn to its flair, and although they are unable to mirror the experience, some, not all, want to accomplish what they have witnessed. The E.T. fits into this rare category of knife.
Unlike the bali-song, the E.T. uses an external toggle to manipulate opening/closing. Once the technique is mastered, there are multiple ways to open/close the design. The techniques vary in skill level, and can be done using both hands, or just one hand. Depending on dexterity, the user can “toggle” the E.T. very quickly, and although maybe not the fastest from a draw and open standpoint (it is very quick though), once the E.T. is in your hand you can open/close it as fast as your hand can work the toggle. Manipulating the E.T. in your hand, is much faster than a bali-song with “continuous” opening/closing. I do feel the bali-song has more tricks and flash, but the E.T. is fresh, and it will be interesting to see where it will be a year from now. I have established 13 different ways to open the E.T., most of them utilizing just one hand. My guess is that there will be a cult following with this knife, at least I hope so.
In an effort to get those who purchase an E.T. jump started, we have done a DVD that comes in the box of every knife. It shows some of the more conservative ways to open and close the knife, and the unique features of the E.T .
The E.T. is similar to the bali-song in that it does have substance to it. By that I mean the knife is more than just a good time. The bali-song once in its open position is very strong, and the design itself locks the blade up solidly. The E.T. is the same, the toggle is the lock, and it’s very sturdy once in the open position.
The E.T is unique with its multiple carry capabilities. It has a deep carry reversible left/right clothing clip (tip up), and the carabiner feature allows for belt loop/D-ring type carry.
51 pieces are necessary in putting together an E.T. Is there a chance for problem? Possibly, but there has not been one E.T. come back for warranty work to date, and we have exhausted R & D on this piece so I feel very confident with its longevity.
The Sandvik steel is hip, under the radar, and above average, the 6061-T6 aluminum scales are tough and lightweight.

The E.T. is an exciting new addition to the knife community. Grant and Gavin Hawk are incredible designers that I know we will see more of in the future. The E.T. is legal, addictive, fun, challenging, and unusual. It also comes in a few different flavors, and there are more variations on tap for the future. On the flip side, it is strong, safe, can be carried multiple ways, and is produced on par with Kershaw quality standards.

Hope this helps you out in deciding on if the E.T. is right for you.

Thomas
Kershaw Knives
 
Joined
Oct 28, 2005
Messages
696
I guess I got my ET before this DVD was included. I can manipulate it pretty well already, but am curious as to what else is on this Kershaw DVD. :thumbup:
 

airyq

Gold Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2003
Messages
765
As another purchaser who bought before the DVD was included, is there any way that I can get a copy of the DVD or can it be down loaded from any where?
 

Thomas W

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Oct 11, 2005
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5,710
JRubeus, I try and stay away from legal questions, but it seems difficult to imagine the E.T. would have any restrictions linked to it, at least at this time. We have had no internal calls to date.
 
Joined
Nov 9, 2005
Messages
1,455
I am not sure if I will buy an E.T. or not, but I think Kershaw did a great job bringing the G&G Hawk design to the masses with an affordable price, yet very good quality.
 

Joe-Dirt

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May 22, 2006
Messages
381
I have an E.T. that I just will not get rid of because I like it so much. It's just a cool knife and it's pretty practical too. I would have never thought so until I held it and used it.

It has a wicked blade and the shape is perfect for just about anything.

The version I have is the Urban Camo with the black plain edge blade.

I think you'll really like it. :thumbup:
 
Joined
Sep 30, 2004
Messages
6,997
I've got one, too.
It's a great quality folder, but the design isn't for me really. I guess it's nice to have it in the collection, but I don't find myself carrying it. Too many moving parts for my liking.
 
Joined
Jan 10, 2006
Messages
9
I like it. Kershaw has done a good job of adding serrations to various parts of the toggle links to provide good traction for fingers and palm. I found that like carrying a full cup of coffee, opening the operating the toggle with one hand works better if you don't watch it. It's a little big for an everyday carry for me, but I carry it anyway. It has the lowest "low rider clip" of any of my folders. It really almost disappears in the pocket. I'm ordering a Hawk model. If I don't like it 500.00 better than the Kershaw, I'm going to be disappointed.
 
Joined
Jan 27, 2002
Messages
801
After following the "traffic" and looking at the video link, I bought one last night. It's a deceptive piece, I'll have to say. It's very light--as in the moving parts are all light, and you'd be tempted to think the knife is insubstantial; not so. Lock-up is solid, action is smooth. (If you don't like the toggle opening, do a gentle "spyder drop" using the 'biner.) It's nice to see a combination of rivets and adjustable fasteners; the small nuts should allow for tuning, yet the rivets will keep the toggles in proper alignment.

I confess to liking folders which can be locked closed; it allows for neck lanyard carry without the need for a neck sheath. Normally, I do a quick-release threading through the lanyard hole, but the carabiner gives me a more secure option, should I want it.

Knife came shaving sharp, but a few passes on the Sharpmaker, and it's in the "scary class." Now, to see how it fares as an EDC next to a slip-joint.

Regards.
 
Joined
May 7, 2005
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20,928
I am glad that YOU like that knife. It isn't for me. let us know how it does for EDC.
 
Joined
Jun 5, 2006
Messages
34
My two cents on the ET
I have had one for an EDC for the past 6-7 months and here are my observations:
1. The knife is very easy to sharpen and holds an edge relatively well.
2. I have not mastered the one handed opening as of yet. I get it about every third try. Maybe if I get the DVD (mine didn't come with one)
3. The blade is prone to rust rather quickly if not cleaned daily. My blade is rusting along the line where the blade meets the grip. I always wipe the blade off before closing so the only thing that I can think of is the rust is being caused by perspiration. I sweat a lot.
4. You will find that after an hour or two of carry the design of the pocket clip will allow your pant material to work its way down into the clip. This will essentially lock the knife in your pocket and will NOT aloow a quick retrieval. You will need to work the knife back and forth to get it out of your pocket.

It is a cool knife but I would NOT reccommend it for EDC because of the above reasons.
 
Joined
Jan 27, 2002
Messages
801
I soak my EDCs in Tuff-Glide (blade and pivots) then wipe dry, so I don't have too much in the way of corrosion problems.

I like a tight clip (I usually end up removing them, bending them tighter, then replacing); riding on public transportation is a good way for a loose clip to dump your piece on the floor--not a cool post 9-11 move.

I've noticed that drawing while pulling the 'biner edge against the seam of my pocket acts as a "wave" opener, so some time saved there.

Personal choice, of course, but so far no problems.
 
Joined
Jan 6, 2005
Messages
13
I just got my ET today. surpisingly lightlweight, and the lock felt really tight. i like that it has an on/off switch to prevent it from opening in my pocket. I do have one complaint though. the screw that holds the belt clip together just came right off and now the pieces that hold the spring together are coming apart. i love the knife, but there are just too many parts for me, i like to K.I.S.S.
 
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