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Lapping stones for flatness

Discussion in 'Maintenance, Tinkering & Embellishment' started by trailhunter, May 27, 2018.

  1. trailhunter

    trailhunter

    129
    May 15, 2018
    I have several stones and chosera I'd like to lap as regular maintenance, what does everyone use to keep their stones flat? I was looking at Atoma diamond plates but they are 70 a piece. Any feedback is appreciated!
     
  2. Diemaker

    Diemaker KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    623
    Apr 28, 2017
    60ish mesh sic powder and a hard flat plate. Flat plates only last so long so keep an eye on them and replace as necessary.
     
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  3. Beansandcarrots

    Beansandcarrots

    439
    Apr 15, 2014
    I use SiC on plate glass if I'm doing a ton of stones at once. Or I will use stearate-coated sandpaper on an 8x3 sanding block if I'm just doing a random lapping. The coating prevents the paper from loading so you can use the crap out of it. I also find the Naniwa SiC flattener to be excellent and it's only, like, 20 bucks, and if you ever need to flatten it (which you technically shouldn't), then you can just lap that on your sidewalk or something.

    If I'm going high-dollar, I'll use a diamond plate, or the diaflat 10x4, but honestly, the three aforementioned cost-effective solutions provided me as good results. My JKI diamond plate actually proves to be the worst of all 5 of my options when working with extremely hard stones.

    Gun-to-my-head recommendation?
    Naniwa SiC Truing stone for its balance of ease of use, speed, versatility (you can employ SiC powder with it to increase aggression), final surface finish (a concern for higher grit stones), and cost investment.
     
    mycough and MissingMontana like this.
  4. HeavyHanded

    HeavyHanded

    Jun 4, 2010
    8" lapidary diamond plates run about $50 ad seem to last forever in this capacity.

    I use my DMT XXC for the rougher stones and a 180 mesh disk for the polishing grade stuff.
     
    mycough, MtnHawk1 and Beansandcarrots like this.
  5. trailhunter

    trailhunter

    129
    May 15, 2018
    Great feedback all, looking into the above recommendations!
     
  6. M-S-T

    M-S-T

    66
    Sep 20, 2016
    I mainly use Atoma 400
     
  7. trailhunter

    trailhunter

    129
    May 15, 2018
    Can I use this for all stones including chosera and all grit sizes without affecting the actual grit of the stones? My concern is lapping a 400 grit stone on the Naniwa and turning it into an 800 because I may have polished the 400 from lapping it.
     
  8. Beansandcarrots

    Beansandcarrots

    439
    Apr 15, 2014
    I haven't personally noticed any issues like that. And if it does do anything like that, the affected abrasive will be worn off quickly with use, so you shouldn't have anything to worry about

    Stones I've used it on:
    Shapton Pro, Glass; Chosera 1k and Pro 400, 1k, 2k and 5k, JNS stones and various others.

    So far the truing stone has done its job well. I couldn't report any concerns or issues with mine
     
  9. trailhunter

    trailhunter

    129
    May 15, 2018
    I ended up going with the atoma 400 and 1200. Not sure why I got a 1200 but I "feel" like it will come in handy for my 1000+ grain stones
     
  10. M-S-T

    M-S-T

    66
    Sep 20, 2016
    Actually, it is the same combination I use. I have bought Atoma #400 and #1200 replacement plate. So I have double sided stone. But #400 is my main side. #1200 side I use only for 5k stones and up.
     
  11. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    Really, grit cannot be changed. Once it is mfg. with a grit it stays that grit. The surface can be affected, smoothed to 'feel' finer but the original grit remains the same. Then as you use it the stone will wear back
    to it's original 'feel'. On a ceramic and India stone this wearing back takes a long time. DM
     
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  12. trailhunter

    trailhunter

    129
    May 15, 2018

    Awesome, thanks for the confirmation.
     
  13. Jason B.

    Jason B. KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jun 13, 2007
    Atoma 140 is the diamond plate you want.
     
    MtnHawk1, jc57 and mycough like this.
  14. wade7575

    wade7575

    979
    Apr 3, 2013
    Be careful how often you flatten your stones I know some guys go over board when they not even close to dished and they end up removing more of the stone from flattening then do to sharpening.
    I have found that Chosera's like to glaze or at least for me they have always been a pain that way and I just use a really fine diamond plate or a product called Rust Eraser that you can get from ebay just make sure they are Medium grit the fine won't do hardly anything,the Rust Eraser can also be used to remove filing's from the stone as well and it will remove less of the stone then a Nagura stone will.
     
    mycough, MtnHawk1 and David Martin like this.
  15. Blues

    Blues Lapsed SuperMod / Cattle Knife Rustler Staff Member Super Mod

    Oct 2, 1998
    I have a set of German rust erasers (rubberized abrasive blocks) that I picked up years ago from Lee Valley for cleaning ceramic rods and hones as well as light sanding projects. They would probably work as well on water stones, but I haven't had the opportunity to use them in that manner.

    Set of three, fine, medium and coarse is about $16 or so.
     
  16. trailhunter

    trailhunter

    129
    May 15, 2018
    Thanks! I can see myself grinding a stone away to dust. I'll be careful on over exaggerating
     
  17. wade7575

    wade7575

    979
    Apr 3, 2013
    Get yourself a good straight edge ruler and use that with a bit of light behind it and even then if you can only see just tiny bit of light you still may not need to flatten your stone.
     
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  18. Wowbagger

    Wowbagger

    Sep 20, 2015
    $70 is inexspensive.

    I may one day buy an Atoma 140
    but for just the longest time I have been using these and other than for Shapton Glass (which the Atoma should be better) I use the two stones below :
    The pink one with the deep grooves is designed to flatten the stones you mentioned.
    Of course it wasn't flat when I got it brand new.
    I used the DMT 220 / 300 to flatten the pink stone flattening stone.
    Something's wrong here . . .
    why not just use the DMT to flatten stones ? Which is what I do.
    Every body says "NOOOOOOOOOOOOO that will destroy the diamond plate ! ! ! !"

    Funny how this more than a decade old "Destroyed" diamond plate still thins and reprofiles these S110V knives quick like a bunny. o_O:confused:

    IMG_4747.jpg
     
    Blues likes this.
  19. mycough

    mycough

    May 20, 2007
    If you watch Murray Carter videos I dont think he advocates flattening stones at all.
    Flat is relative I believe, I am attentive to it, but I am not gonna get anal and watch shaptons wash down the drain.
    Just my thoughts, some of these stones are expensive.

    Russ
     
    Blues likes this.
  20. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    cough, agreed. I level my Norton JUM-3 maybe every 2 years on the coarse side. As needed. The fine side
    can go 5 years. And this is the most used/ needed stone. Plus, with this stone it sheds grit as it works. With
    a Norton India or a Spyderco ceramic, it can go 10-12 years before it needs it. Water stones are different. DM
     
    mycough and Blues like this.

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