1. Welcome to the New & Improved BladeForums. New software info here. Please report problems in Tech Support, and read existing threads before posting! - Spark
  2. I've changed the default forum style to Flat Awesome based on feedback. Don't like it? Click here to change how the forums look Feedback on this is welcome here.

Making my first set of scales need advice on hardware!

Discussion in 'Shop Talk - BladeSmith Questions and Answers' started by nuckingfuts, Sep 27, 2012.

  1. nuckingfuts

    nuckingfuts

    484
    Dec 20, 2011
    Howdy yall

    Ive been itching to make my first pair of scales and I figured I'd make them for my izula first.

    Im using green canvas micarta with toxic green liners. The part im kinda stuck on is what hardware to use. Im not picky I just need something to hold em together and want to be able to take them apart.

    Would something like these chain ring bolts work well?

    [​IMG]

    Im not to inclined with this type of stuff, do they have some type of step bits or something similar to drill the holes?

    Im buying a drill press tomorrow so Im trying to order the hardware asap because Im absolutely dying from excitement to finish these scales!

    Really any advice at all would be appreciated!

    Thanks alot guys!
     
  2. james terrio

    james terrio Sharpest Knife in the Light Socket Moderator

    Apr 15, 2010
    Yes, those are great for removable scales! The same supplier may have a stepped bit to match, or you can just buy one bit to match the shaft size and one to match the head. Drill the shaft holes all the way through, then drill for the heads just deep enough so they sit flush with the scales. Easy-peasy.
     
  3. nuckingfuts

    nuckingfuts

    484
    Dec 20, 2011
    Hey James thanks for the suggestions!

    Im so excited to get these things rigged up!
     
  4. tim37a

    tim37a

    626
    May 18, 2010
    Drill the heads first then drill the thru holes. If you drill the thru holes first the larger bit for the heads will not have anything to grip so it will skip all over the place.
     
  5. james terrio

    james terrio Sharpest Knife in the Light Socket Moderator

    Apr 15, 2010
    Where the heck are you getting that back-ass-wards idea from? :confused:

    Drilling the smaller through-holes first establishes center. It's easy as pie to center a standard split-point bit into a smaller hole that already exists. The tolerances achieved this way are more than accurate enough for knife-building purposes.

    This is not "theory", I've done this literally hundreds of times.
     
  6. rustyrazor

    rustyrazor KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Oct 13, 2011
    I use the thru hole as a guide for the head hole... I find its easier to make sure you have the same center for both holes and neither one is lop sided.

    BIG CAUTION: ensure to hold the scales solid (preferrably with a vice) canvas micarta is very coarse and what i call "grippy" it can catch and pull quite quickly if you're not careful. i have ruined more than one hole by getting slack and allowing the bit to eat too much of the handle, sometimes taking it right out of my hand.
     
  7. SunsetFisherman

    SunsetFisherman

    315
    Feb 4, 2012
    hmm and then trying to center the smaller hole down inside the bigger hole where you can't even see it? Terrible idea, small hole then big hole :thumbup:
     
  8. PB Wilson

    PB Wilson

    Jul 17, 2006
    If you don't move the scale on a drill press table, either way will work just fine. Just swap bits and drill away.
     
  9. Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith

    Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith ilmarinen - MODERATOR Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 20, 2004
    Or, take a bit that matches the head size and grind it into a stepped bit for your bolts....one step ( pun intended) drilling.
     
  10. woodwrkr221

    woodwrkr221

    391
    Jan 28, 2011
    C'mon guys, it depends on what type of bit(s) you're using. With twist drills, small first. With Forstner or spurr bits that have a center spur, large first.
     
  11. james terrio

    james terrio Sharpest Knife in the Light Socket Moderator

    Apr 15, 2010
    I suspect that's what Tim was thinking, they will make a center hole to guide the next bit. I use brad-points and forstners so rarely, I didn't think of it that way. I apologize for being snarky.
     
  12. Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith

    Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith ilmarinen - MODERATOR Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 20, 2004
    Twist or spade, make one as a shouldern drill. It takes about 5 minutes if you are new at it, one or two if you have done a few before.
     
  13. woodwrkr221

    woodwrkr221

    391
    Jan 28, 2011
    If I tried making my own shoulder drill I'm not sure it would turn out so good. I used Corby's for the first time a month ago when I put new scales on a friends Wustoff utility knife. I did like James mentioned and bought a matching step drill from the same supplier as the Corby's. Worked great, I'm a believer!

    The chain ring bolts look interesting too, gotta try those.
     
  14. nuckingfuts

    nuckingfuts

    484
    Dec 20, 2011
    Hey guys thanks for all the help!

    I really do appreciate it
     
  15. GTH11

    GTH11

    626
    Feb 21, 2011
    Insert a threaded piece of brass, and gain some shear strength and you can use some nice 8-32 ss bolts from your local hardware store.
     
  16. tim37a

    tim37a

    626
    May 18, 2010
    Thanks Woodwrkr221. I use Corbys with a step drill but before I got the step drill I used a Forstner and a twist drill.
     
  17. logem

    logem

    741
    Nov 23, 2003
    I prefer corby bolts/nuts. As long as you counter-bore the hole to a good depth, they allow some leeway on how much you can take off of the top of them to finish the scales. Of course, corby bolts are permanent once the screwdriver slot on the heads are ground off.

    I finish my scales after they are screwed and glued to the tang. For me, corby bolts work best and look the cleanest.

    Mike L.
    LoGiudice Custom Knives
     

Share This Page