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Mcusta Yoroi

Joined
May 26, 2006
Messages
26
I'm seriously considering buying a Mcusta Yoroi. Are there any outstanding pros or cons to this folder? I really like the appearance of both blade and handle and the blade length is ideal for my uses.

Does anyone know how to pronounce the company name?
 
I'm seriously considering buying a Mcusta Yoroi. Are there any outstanding pros or cons to this folder? I really like the appearance of both blade and handle and the blade length is ideal for my uses.
Does anyone know how to pronounce the company name?

I have several Mcusta's. They are wonderful knives. Beautiful designs and workmanship. Liners are thick for a knife of their size. They lock up nice an tight. The detent is not too "stiff" so they are easy to open. All of mine are solid VG-10 but the Demascus looks nice. Just a few strokes on the Sharpmaker and I can dry shave with them. I prefer the micarta or wood handles. Metal is cold to the touch and I like the feel of the sculptured handles.

If you are buying from Jananese Knife Direct, you will find no better service and desire to please anywhere. You will not be disappointed. They also have knives from other famous Japanese knifemakers. I also have 2 knives from Seki Cut. One is a Bob Lum design. I also have a couple of Hattori knives on my list.

http://www.japaneseknifedirect.com/MCUSTA.html

The only con I can think of is that you will probably buy more than one, if that can be considered a con.

Japanese written in English is prounouned just like it is spelled, if that helps any. "Mc" like in "Mc Donald" and then just "oo", "st", "ah".

Regards
 
And that's the story! :D

They really are beautiful knives. I understand the name comes from "machine custom", an attempt to make a production knife at custom levels of fit & finish.

The only question that ever came up about them is that the all metal models can be a bit heavy. For many of us, that is not a disadvantage, but it's worth considering.
 
I notice the Yoroi lacks a pocket clip and it comes with a little pouch. Does the pouch have provisions to attach to a belt or clip to trouser waistbands? I'm used to having pocket clips, and would hate to pass up this beautiful folder over such a trivial point, but nothing beats having your knife clipped to your pocket and ready to go (at least in my opinion). I suppose I could drill and tap holes for a clip. Weight isn't a problem since I usually carry both a Leatherman Wave and my EDC knife (currently a Benchmade 530), but it will be a fair deal heavier and bulkier than my 530.

Thanks much for the info and link!
 
I notice the Yoroi lacks a pocket clip and it comes with a little pouch. Does the pouch have provisions to attach to a belt or clip to trouser waistbands? I'm used to having pocket clips, and would hate to pass up this beautiful folder over such a trivial point, but nothing beats having your knife clipped to your pocket and ready to go (at least in my opinion). I suppose I could drill and tap holes for a clip. Weight isn't a problem since I usually carry both a Leatherman Wave and my EDC knife (currently a Benchmade 530), but it will be a fair deal heavier and bulkier than my 530.

Thanks much for the info and link!

Yes, I'm sure the pouch has a belt loop. Call or send an email if you have doubts.
 
I have a Mcusta TAKE (bamboo) damascus folder. What an awsome knife. Fit and finish is second to none and comes razor sharp. The pouch is traditional japanese and yes it has a belt loop.
 
If the sheath is the cloth, flower pattern number, it has a belt loop attatchment and the flap is held closed with Velcro. I have the bamboo damascus metal handled model, but can't remember the name of it right now. It is a bit heavy for it's size, but, I like heft in a knife.:)

I have four McCustas and they are all top shelf. The damascus clad/VG-10 core models are just flat out beautiful folders. Mine all have actions that are butter smooth and came OOB hair poppin' sharp. The longer I own them and use them, the more I am appreciating them. I personally haven't had any rust issues yet, but, to be honest I don't carry them in situations where I will be sweating or in adverse weather conditions. Or, in other words, I haven't been caught in a downpour while carrying one yet.;)

Enjoy your McCusta! They are very nice knives for the money.
 
About the blade, the Yoroi appears to have a multi-layer construction based upon raygun's review link, but it is still called "damascus". IIRC, Cold Steel had a similar construction which they called "San Mai III" (or something like that). So the discolouration near the edge of the Yoroi blade is caused by the grind of the blade exposing the junction between the two dissimilar metals or is it an actual "hamon" or temper line commonly seen on japanese swords? I used to practice kendo and iaido and have handled real katana (shinken) and their hamon are not as definitive as the one on the Yoroi blade, so I'm curious as to what it really is. So is the whole blade VG-10 or is the core VG-10 and the laminating sides some softer steel? (Note: I only know how to use the swords, not how to make them or the metallurgy involved.)

I'm glad the pouch has a belt loop, that saves me from having to drill and tap holes for a clip. I would hate to ruin such a pretty handle.
 
The A.G.Russell catalog says the VG-10 blades are clad in 33 layer 420 stainless damascus. So that is not a hamon, but a discontinuity between the core and the cladding.

The Take (bamboo) style also comes in cocobolo, as well as the original damascus, both of which are spectacularly beautiful.
 
About the blade, the Yoroi appears to have a multi-layer construction based upon raygun's review link, but it is still called "damascus". IIRC, Cold Steel had a similar construction which they called "San Mai III" (or something like that). So the discolouration near the edge of the Yoroi blade is caused by the grind of the blade exposing the junction between the two dissimilar metals or is it an actual "hamon" or temper line commonly seen on japanese swords? I used to practice kendo and iaido and have handled real katana (shinken) and their hamon are not as definitive as the one on the Yoroi blade, so I'm curious as to what it really is. So is the whole blade VG-10 or is the core VG-10 and the laminating sides some softer steel? (Note: I only know how to use the swords, not how to make them or the metallurgy involved.)

I'm glad the pouch has a belt loop, that saves me from having to drill and tap holes for a clip. I would hate to ruin such a pretty handle.


Look at the pictures carefully and read the link I gave you above. The Yoroi is San Mai (3 layers)
http://www.japaneseknifedirect.com/MCustaMC-37DClassicDamascusFolderSeries.html
and others like the Tanbo, are Damascus
http://www.japaneseknifedirect.com/MCustaMC-35DClassicDamascusFolderSeries.html.
You can see the difference in the pictures plus ones that are San Mai are noted as such. They do call them all Damascus in general, unless otherwise noted, so it can be bit confusing.

If you want more explanation and confirmation, I suggest you email the dealer. They are very willing to answer any questions about their products.

Regards
 
I visited the link that bladeprince supplied and was struck at all the quality knives offered. I am looking at a couple of pcs offered by Koji Hara.


MPE
 
Although I no longer have any high-quality Japanese knives, I do have many Japanese colleagues -- since I am basically a Solid State Physicist. And several of them are Knife Knuts (or Blade Freaks, etc.). They have impressive collections of Japanese steel, mono and folded multi.

Based on my admittedly modest practical knife experience, those are some truly impressive blades. Not better than American, but fully equal -- and I love their different aesthetic, their Eastern 'cool.'

With just a little care, you really can't go wrong. Their knives and steels will definitely satisfy you.

Just stay away from those hand-made, old-style Katanas/Waks/Tantos. Unless you're genuinely wealthy (not rich, wealthy!). That's an addiction that'll kill ya!:eek:

Just noticed MPC's post: I absolutely agree. Hara is an excellent bladesmith -- I have handled three of his pieces. Superb fit and finish...plus that Eastern 'cool.'
 
Just checked out the Bladeprince's links.

Those are some FINE prices!

Oh my, starting to get that itch...the Yoroi is a very attractive design.
 
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