Mechanic's Knife

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Jul 18, 2019
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Hello everyone, I am about to start a new job working changing tires and fixing tires and other mechanically inclinged stuff. I was wondering if you had any good suggestions for a good mechanic's knife- I think that means it should be tough, practical, and cheap in case it gets shredded. I already have a Cold Steel Recon, and I'll probably end up carrying a box cutter anyway, but give me suggestions. And wish me luck with an actual real job!
 
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Mar 5, 2017
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First, congrats on the new job. I've been a mechanic most of my adult life. It's been a great career track for me. As for a knife, almost anything will work. But I'll suggest a CRKT Razel. The leading edge works great as a gasket scraper or wood chisel when you need one. I have the large one. It's a hand filling heavy thing. And it's out of stock most places. But I see that BladeHQ has the small version in stock. And it doesn't cost much.

Be careful with a knife with a clip. Easy to scratch paint. And that's no way to get the boss on your side.
 
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Mar 5, 2017
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..... A leather man might be a great option too also.

I have several versions of Leatherman and multi tools. But I've never carried one at work. I have a Snap-On toolbox less than 20 feet away. OTOH, for a fella that spend most of the day standing at a tire machine, it may be a handy tool. The sheath eliminates the paint scratching pocket clip, but adds a belt buckle. (They do make mechanics' belts with covered buckles.)
 
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Sep 18, 2018
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SAK's are wonderful and should be about all you need in the Automotive world.
Also it fits nice in the pocket with no pocket clip to worry about.
I carry a Tinker in l.f.p. every day.
 

Bigfattyt

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Jun 23, 2007
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Cold steel Tuff Lite, or tuff lite mini. Small, box cutter appearance and toughest lock in the world. (Triad Lock). They come in different colors, and are completely utilitarian and cheap to replace.

I have three Recon 1's (two with the Triad lock, one with the old Ultra lock)
 
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Hello everyone, I am about to start a new job working changing tires and fixing tires and other mechanically inclinged stuff. I was wondering if you had any good suggestions for a good mechanic's knife- I think that means it should be tough, practical, and cheap in case it gets shredded. I already have a Cold Steel Recon, and I'll probably end up carrying a box cutter anyway, but give me suggestions. And wish me luck with an actual real job!

That is what I started out doing before I became an ASE certified Master Tech and I've been through all kinds. From cheapy blades to expensive to every blade offered on the Snap on truck.:oops::oops::D The one I finally found was the letherman skeletool. I clipped it to my front belt loop so it was front and center when I needed it. It is extremely light and does a little bit of everything. This is just my experience but it's the best tool to keep u from running back and forth to ur tool box for little stuff...... Letherman skeletool....... Trust me:D:D:D:D:D
 

3fifty7

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Dec 24, 2016
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In a tire/mechanic shop you can do all you need with your Recon and the Leatherman of your choice, I usually buy my guys a Rebar.
 
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Aug 21, 2019
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Your box cutter will probably do 99% percent of what you need it to do, and is easily replaceable if someone decides to borrow it. I never worked in a mechanics shop, but I worked construction and a fair bit of tools were considered to be company property, regardless if you owned them or not. I would not carry something you would worry about someone grabbing and using to pull a staple out with. Someone asking "can I borrow your knife?" might be planning to use it to try and scrape the corrosion off a seized nut.
 

SVTFreak

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Mar 8, 2011
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I build cars as a hobby. Working on painted cars, I carry only slip joints in my pocket. No clip to scratch an finish. I do keep a utility knife (box cutter) in my tool box though. The skip joint I always carry one with two blades. A wharncliff or sheep's foot as one, and a clip point as other. Covers about every knife task I need.
 

blades&wrenches

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Jan 11, 2014
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Ive been using a Spyderco Endela for work for a little while now and I’m very happy with it. Very grippy when hands are dirty or slick, tough, very easy to open, secure lock, and easy to sharpen. Also lightweight and unobtrusive in the pocket. So my suggestion would be an FRN Spyderco like the Delica, Endela, Stretch, or Endura based on your size preference.
 

cut it out

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Apr 11, 2010
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The pocket clip scratching paint is a legit concern. I’ve done it to my own truck. Not a mechanic but I’ve done it. Good point. And I agree a utility knife will do 99% of your tasks but heck this is a knife forum so get a good knife too. :)
 
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Sep 10, 2019
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How about the benchmade triage? Blunt tip can be used for scraping or prying in general and prying off old stick on wheel weights. If your using it to pry on electrical connectors you cant pierce your hand or wiring or hoses that may be near the area you are working, hook blade can be used for cutting wire or stripping wire plus you also have a glass breaker. Ive been in the tire/automotive industry for 12 years, we do everything from vehicle service to repairing tractor tires large and small. You really need a serrated blade, especially to cut old valve stems out of wheels or to cut old hoses. I Have a benchmade triage that is supposed to be here tomorrow, its going to be my edc knife.
 
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Nov 19, 2014
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A box cutter/utility knife is gonna suck bad when you have to cut a heater hose, radiator hose, wiring harness, make low angle cuts, make blind cuts from awkward positions, twisting cuts... just to name a few.
I recommend a one hand open/close locking 2.5-3 inch blade you can completely palm for those times when you have to reach blindly in a tight spot and make a cut by feel. You want complete control without the edge accidently contacting something it shouldn't, on the way in, and out.
Carry it in your pocket if clip scratching is a concern.
 

Ajack60

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Apr 21, 2013
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I'd start my new job first, see what all a knife would be used for, check with the folks that work there to see what they're carrying for work. Then, I'd probably get an Outdoor Edge razor knife. They have changeable blades. The blades are 3.5"
 
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Jul 18, 2019
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How about the benchmade triage? Blunt tip can be used for scraping or prying in general and prying off old stick on wheel weights. If your using it to pry on electrical connectors you cant pierce your hand or wiring or hoses that may be near the area you are working, hook blade can be used for cutting wire or stripping wire plus you also have a glass breaker. Ive been in the tire/automotive industry for 12 years, we do everything from vehicle service to repairing tractor tires large and small. You really need a serrated blade, especially to cut old valve stems out of wheels or to cut old hoses. I Have a benchmade triage that is supposed to be here tomorrow, its going to be my edc knife.
That's a great knife my dude, but I am not prepared to use a 100$+ knife where it could easily get destroyed and ruined, or "borrowed"
 
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Sep 10, 2019
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Theres a guy on ebay who has them brand new for 84.99 free shipping. Supposed to be 100% genuine. Has 100% feedback, has sold 32 of them. I bought three, should be here tomorrow. I can post some pics and first impressions if youd like.
 
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Sep 19, 2007
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Being in a shop environment I think you will have access to every tool you might need to do your job. HOWEVER, if you plan on carrying and using something, make sure it has rough scales so they don't get slippery when oiled, greased, etc. I think the Rekon will do nicely. Besides, if you break it, your boss is not going to replace it, as you probable where not told to use your own knife for any task.

Congratulations on the new job!
 
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