Military Filipino Machete

Joined
Feb 3, 2000
Messages
796
Ted,
Turn around time was about a month. The shipping was about another month. I don't think that is typical but who knows. The Gununting was definitely worth the wait. I have 5 Gununtings including one from Traditional Filipino Weapons. I like this one the best it's just the right size.

Ray Smith
 
Joined
Feb 3, 2000
Messages
796
It was the 17" blade the handle fits my hand better than the other Gununtings i own also.

Ray Smith
 
Joined
Nov 13, 2008
Messages
2
Turn around time is really good for this style of custom work. The quality is great and you can order a large or small sized handle depending on your hand size.

Oh and did I mention that it cuts great!!! :cool:
 
Joined
Jun 7, 2002
Messages
2,984
heat-sunk tang onto wood. early on, i thought this was a weak system and i pictured blades suddenly flying out from the handle during kali practice. but my years in the visayas and mindanao taught me how strong this arrangement is. it's like the wood has grown around the blade tang. in rural areas, you see people doing gardening work and chopping firewood using dull, wornout guloks. the blade had been dulled back several inches from years of heavy use but the wooden handle is still firmly attached to the blade.
 
Joined
Apr 29, 2002
Messages
5,554
is it possible to get a wooden sheath/scabbard instead? whilst kydex is tough, I do not like to thrust a kydex-sheathed ginunting around my belt.

is the tang glued to the handled, or is it just heat sinked...
 
Joined
Aug 23, 2003
Messages
185
heat-sunk tang onto wood. early on, i thought this was a weak system and i pictured blades suddenly flying out from the handle during kali practice. but my years in the visayas and mindanao taught me how strong this arrangement is. it's like the wood has grown around the blade tang. in rural areas, you see people doing gardening work and chopping firewood using dull, wornout guloks. the blade had been dulled back several inches from years of heavy use but the wooden handle is still firmly attached to the blade.

Yup the hot tang method is very sturdy. It may seem strange at first to trust that it will keep the blade in the handle, but its been proven to be extremely effective.


is it possible to get a wooden sheath/scabbard instead? whilst kydex is tough, I do not like to thrust a kydex-sheathed ginunting around my belt.

is the tang glued to the handled, or is it just heat sinked...

It's both heat sunk and glued it.

We've gotten some requests for hardwood sheaths, and we're studying the possibility for 2009. It will go against our company's intention, which is to make more functional Filipino blades using modern materials, and I do trust kydex enough to use it, but I'm willing to listen to what customers want. :)
 
Joined
Dec 21, 2002
Messages
553
Juramentado,

How bout a peened version. Especially with carabao horn. If I were in P.I. I would have absolutely no problem with the non peened version. However, as makers know, woods change (expand/shrink, moisture, etc.) depending on climate. Scabbard makers included.

I've personally tested and broken many hardwood baston sets ( one in cold climate and one in warm) such as cocobolo, bahi, kamagong, african ebony. They have performed poorly in the colder climate because of hardness/brittleness of the wood.These are tropical woods afterall. And no, rubbing mineral oil contrary to popular belief only prevents drying out and won't help the nature of its hardness. My bahi from Qiapo market All cracked just arriving back to nyc's winter.

That said, I have quite a few ginunting and Pinoy blades and I really dig these. Just wished they were peened. Thats what this potential customer would like to see.
 
Joined
Jun 7, 2002
Messages
2,984
just a little bit of history: here are bolos designed by americans, for use by american soldiers in the philippines. i guess they qualify as traditional. :)

obviously patterned after working bolos in luzon main island: 1909 design
edged_bolo_m1909_150.jpg


now you know how the smatchette originated: 1917 design
edged_bolo_m1917_800.jpg


as we know it today: 1942
machete_ww2_800.jpg
 
Joined
Jan 27, 2003
Messages
1,319
I recently recieved a typhoon gununting and the punyo flairs, both top and bottom, are even larger/more pronounced than in the pic up above in this thread. Before I modify things, I am wondering if anyone knows of a practical use for these?
I don't see any improved use for them in trapping, striking or weapon retention. What am I missing?
TIA
Ted
 

MVF

Gold Member
Joined
Sep 2, 2005
Messages
2,798
I would also be interested in the answer to that. As well, can anyone discuss the ginunting versus the dahong palay? 17" versus 21"?

I am currently leaning towards the 21" dahong palay, but am open to being persuaded.
 
Joined
Dec 21, 2002
Messages
553
Ted,

it might be helpful if you can post a pic. Many times, especially with Filipino bolos that I've felt (including a few I own) its final size is random depending on the size of wood or horn the maker started with. I had 6 ROA bolos in the same design, all in carabao horn and none of them felt the same. Some were flatter or rounder on the sides, some have more of a pinky hook, some handles smaller and it all had to do with the size of what the maker started with. In your case, the maker might have been trying to make the handle proportioned or maybe he just wanted it to look more ornate. Maybe just aesthetics. I have quite a few bolos with the parakeet head shape and they all look and feel different.

MVF, what would you like to discuss about the two? The ginunting is more slash oriented and forward heavy and the dahong palay is more thrust oriented. Personally I would opt for the 17" as its long enough to cover a longer weapon and absolutely more maneuverable in close quarters. An extra 4" wouldn't help in cqb and isn't all that additionally helpful in distance. With my 15" and 19" KC bolos, I don't feel a reach advantage and I try to rely on footwork for proper reach as these aren't lengthy like Euro longswords anyway. Besides, I always try to imagine that the opponent will have a blade longer than mine and don't rely on fixed reach. This is just my opinion. If the 21" suits you, go for it. I like the ginunting.
 

MVF

Gold Member
Joined
Sep 2, 2005
Messages
2,798
Thanks Chugokujin. I pulled out my longest machete- it's 18" and feels plenty long, so I guess I'll be going with the 17" dahong palay. You confirmed my guess about the difference and I have enough slashers. Thanks again for the help!
 
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