My First Chisel Grind

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Feb 29, 2016
Messages
81
2ycd5WX.jpg


I think that trying new things for the first time is possibly the most exciting part of making knives. Some of these projects certainly test the abilities of the equipment I use. I can't wait for the awesome 2x72 Northridge Tool Grinder to darken my doorstep.
 
What are the pieces of metal sticking out from the top and bottom?
What is the steel thickness and blade height?
 
Yea, you can just post the bare photo here without all the titles and taglines

Try taking the photo straight on flat, any sort of cockeyed angles distorts the perception.


I'll criticize the size and placement of the tang pin hole
It's pretty large for the tang width, it's not centered.

I think if you break it, it will break there.


The top of the spine and the top of the blade should line up.


As Stacy mentioned, your guards are funny
At the very least, they should line up
Probably you can live without them
 
If you are going to have corner in your edge, you should probably grind the two edge lines separately and in perpendicular to the edges so you grind lines run parallel and meet at the same kind angle as the edges do. But it looks like you are still working on getting a nice grind line. Maybe try the higher grit for more control as you approach the line.

Any idea what sort of angle you ground the bevel to, and is it going to be a zero grind?
 
Yea, you can just post the bare photo here without all the titles and taglines

Try taking the photo straight on flat, any sort of cockeyed angles distorts the perception.


I'll criticize the size and placement of the tang pin hole
It's pretty large for the tang width, it's not centered.

I think if you break it, it will break there.


The top of the spine and the top of the blade should line up.


As Stacy mentioned, your guards are funny
At the very least, they should line up
Probably you can live without them


Agreed on all statements. The pins I'm using are massive 5/16 solid brass. I wanted something "beefy" for sheering force. On the hole placement, yeah, it should be centered. It was a classic "measure twice, cut once" failure moment. :) The top of the blade and the spine do line up. Feedback much appreciated and it helps me learn. Thanks.
 
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If you are going to have corner in your edge, you should probably grind the two edge lines separately and in perpendicular to the edges so you grind lines run parallel and meet at the same kind angle as the edges do. But it looks like you are still working on getting a nice grind line. Maybe try the higher grit for more control as you approach the line.

Any idea what sort of angle you ground the bevel to, and is it going to be a zero grind?

Thank you. Its tough to get clean grind lines on the tiny 1x30 I'm using while waiting for the 2x72 to arrive. Not much working space. Yes, its a zero grind. I'll check the angle when I'm back in the shop. Its .250" 01-steel but the angle escapes me. Thanks for the feedback.
 
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.025" ... wow, I am impressed you got a crisp chisel grind on something that thin, much less will be able to do HT without turning into a corkscrew. :)
 
Agreed on all statements. The pins I'm using are massive 5/16 solid brass. I wanted something "beefy" for sheering force. On the hole placement, yeah, it should be centered. It was a classic "measure twice, cut once" failure moment. :) The top of the blade and the spine do line up. Feedback much appreciated and it helps me learn. Thanks.

Massive rivets just means you have a massive hole in both the tang and handle. Your handles are more likely to split from a big hole then shear. Something with a small shaft and big head, like a tradition rivet or a corby is going to keep you holes small and you surface area high.


I use a 1x30. It is harder, but using the platform to brace the blade helps control it.
 
Massive rivets just means you have a massive hole in both the tang and handle. Your handles are more likely to split from a big hole then shear. Something with a small shaft and big head, like a tradition rivet or a corby is going to keep you holes small and you surface area high.


I use a 1x30. It is harder, but using the platform to brace the blade helps control it.

Gotcha. I was using the old "bigger is better" equation, but I completely understand your point. Thank you.

With the 1x30, with this project, the handle is so long, to keep the strait profile the blade rise above the factory platen. I would make a longer one if I didn't have a 2x72 on the way. There platform worked great to get the horizontal grind, but the end grind (furthest out on the tip) was a bear. I'm very happy it came out as clean as it did. :)

One thing I've found helpful is, having started with almost no equipment, and making many of the tools I use now, I have a lot of time invested with each step ahead, giving me a much better understanding of the process.
 
First, I appears you have the chisel grind set up for a Lefty. I know Emerson a few others put the grind on the viewing side for Curb appeal but the knife will tend to roll over in a right hand. You want the flat on the inside near the body.
Do some testing and you will see for yourself.
The look great but preform like crap compared to one made properly for the users Dominate hand.:)

On the Pins, I suggest Loveless style, they are the strongest of the Mechanical fasteners with Corbys in second place. A good epoxy is to seal out moisture.

You can do what you like with your Choils & thumb ramps, I always have.
If you want to build for the Wiz-Bang Tactical market, If it fits? Do it!;)

You are doing well, :thumbup:Now test this one and built another.
 
First, I appears you have the chisel grind set up for a Lefty. I know Emerson a few others put the grind on the viewing side for Curb appeal but the knife will tend to roll over in a right hand. You want the flat on the inside near the body.
Do some testing and you will see for yourself.
The look great but preform like crap compared to one made properly for the users Dominate hand.:)

On the Pins, I suggest Loveless style, they are the strongest of the Mechanical fasteners with Corbys in second place. A good epoxy is to seal out moisture.

You can do what you like with your Choils & thumb ramps, I always have.
If you want to build for the Wiz-Bang Tactical market, If it fits? Do it!;)

You are doing well, :thumbup:Now test this one and built another.

Awesome! Thanks so much!
Jeff
 
What angle is that grind? Looks like about 20*

For a 1/4" thick stock a 15* grind will give you much better cutting performance
 
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