Need help identifying old hammer head

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by jacob.381703, Oct 8, 2018.

  1. jacob.381703

    jacob.381703

    28
    Sep 22, 2018
    [​IMG][/IMG]
     
  2. jacob.381703

    jacob.381703

    28
    Sep 22, 2018
    [​IMG]
     
  3. jacob.381703

    jacob.381703

    28
    Sep 22, 2018
    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
    garry3 likes this.
  4. jacob.381703

    jacob.381703

    28
    Sep 22, 2018
    I found this hammer head in my Grandma’s barn. The only markings I can see so far is Diamond D 12 -
     
  5. A17

    A17

    Jan 9, 2018
    Looks like a sheetmetal hammer to me. I can't help on the maker, though. The only diamond co I could find only made farriers tools.
     
    garry3 likes this.
  6. Square_peg

    Square_peg Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    What is the size/weight?

    'Diamond' is probably the Diamond Calk Company. They started making horseshoes and farriers tools but branched out into many other tools including their famous crescent wrenches and pliers.

    This is likely a farriers or blacksmiths cold cut tool.
     
  7. Steve Tall

    Steve Tall

    Aug 28, 2010
    Square_peg likes this.
  8. jacob.381703

    jacob.381703

    28
    Sep 22, 2018
    I will have to measure it tomorrow and update. Need to find a scale to weigh it. Thanks for the information. I think this kinda stuff is so fascinating. Finding something as simple as a hammer head. Cleaning it and looking into some history about it.
     
  9. jacob.381703

    jacob.381703

    28
    Sep 22, 2018
  10. gben

    gben

    380
    Nov 26, 2014
    If this hammer-head is under a pound, it was usually called a "riveting hammer" in old catalogs, if it is two-pounds or more, then in old catalogs it is called an "engineer's or blacksmith's hammer.

    People these days are mostly not aware of riveting metal and things together, but in the early-mid twentieth century it was a major industry to make and use rivets. The metal-shop in our local school used to give us projects to make which required using rivets which were hammered with the peen of a hammer during installation.

    The larger hammers like this for general or blacksmith use were usually called a cross-peen style.
     
    garry3 and survivor45 like this.
  11. jacob.381703

    jacob.381703

    28
    Sep 22, 2018
    I don’t have a weight yet but it’s 5 7/8” long by 7/8” wide. Feels about like 8 oz
     
  12. Square_peg

    Square_peg Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    The length of this tool compared to its girth suggests it was struck by some other hammer and used as a cutter. The cutting tip may have been rounded over with time. Just a hunch.
     
  13. Fmont

    Fmont Gold Member Gold Member

    970
    Apr 20, 2017
    If I can piggyback, I'm not familiar with this hammer type I picked up for 3 bucks. I think it may be for sheet metal? Put a jarrah wood handle on it. Pretty, pretty hard to work with, too.[​IMG]

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/x53pj6q229gon6t/20181010_025223.jpg?dl=0

    Any info appreciated!

    ETA: It's Standard Tool Co., and the shape is exactly like a ball peen, but the eye in the head is quite small and instead of the ball peen it has a smaller flat face.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2018

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