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need help

Joined
Jul 8, 2006
Messages
4
Ok, im 15 and I want to try out knife makeing, but I dont have lage amount of money to spend and Id like to try it out with out makeing a huge comitment. At the moment about the only equipment I have or can afford is a grinder. Ive started grinding on old files but I read a few posts that said that wasnt a verry reliable sorce of steel. So if anyone has any sugestions for a good cheep supply of steel and any sugestions as far as heat treating goes. I dont think i can aford a forge nor would I have any place to put it. Any help or sugestions would be greatly apreciated

thanks in advance,
Paul
 
Paul,
At this stage what you need most of all is KNOWLEDGE. Buy the book "Step by step knifemaking" by David Boye. I just checked and it's about 13$ on ebay. This book will save you 13$ in mistakes before you know it! The book is also geared partially toward the budget minded knifemaker like yourself. As for heat treating, don't worry about that yet. Many people will heat treat your carbon knives for a price hardly worth their effort. Also this is a good way to ensure that it is done properly in the beginning of your career.
Good Luck,
Matt Doyle
 
I got "The $50 knife shop" and got started for under $100, one-brick forge and all. That was buying new stuff, not looking for deals/etc.. Skip the grinder, go for hand files to start with. It takes longer, but I think the slower pace makes for better learning/less mistakes to begin with.
 
Paul,

Spend a few dollars and get some good steel. I still use 01 because it is inexpensive and easy to harden and temper. Handle, pin material, etc can be scrounged. I've gotten some hardwood flooring (bamboo) for handles.

www.egroundstock.com has 01 steel, may not be the cheapest, but the selection is good and shiping is included in the cost. No minimum order either.

another good book is the $50 knife shop by Wayne Goddard. He has some inovative ways to get things done.

My first few knives were made using a hack saw and files, all by hand. It took awhile but it was worth the effort.

I really enjoy making knives as a hobby. It keeps me out of trouble, and when I'm done I have a knife.

Good luck, have patience.

Ric
 
Another good book to look at is "The Complete Bladesmith" by Jim Hrisuolas. "How to Make Knives" by Barney and Loveless shows three ways to make a knife, including shaping one with files.

Also, where are you located? you may be able to find a maker in your area to talk with, or get time in his shop.

Ken
 
Ok, im 15 and I want to try out knife makeing, but I dont have lage amount of money to spend and Id like to try it out with out makeing a huge comitment. At the moment about the only equipment I have or can afford is a grinder. Ive started grinding on old files but I read a few posts that said that wasnt a verry reliable sorce of steel. So if anyone has any sugestions for a good cheep supply of steel and any sugestions as far as heat treating goes. I dont think i can aford a forge nor would I have any place to put it. Any help or sugestions would be greatly apreciated

thanks in advance,
Paul

Hello Paul

Read all you can on Knife making you can get your steel here at http://www.admiralsteel.com/ It's Number One in my book. I hope this will help you on your way as being a knife maker.

Barkes:thumbup:
When I leave this world I would like to be known by the one who make the knives from start to finish.

http://my.hsonline.net/wizard/knifeshop
1.812.526.6390
 
Read all you can on Knife making you can get your steel here at http://www.admiralsteel.com/ It's Number One in my book. I hope this will help you on your way as being a knife maker.

Absolutely. I got my first YEAR'S worth of steel for $21, including shipping from Admiral Steel (ok, it's true, I worked at it pretty slowly). Get some 1075, 1085, or 1095. It's just as good as O1 and quite a bit less expensive.

For knowledge, books are good, but if you're diligent, I'm pretty sure there's nothing you'll find in a book that you can't find here in ShopTalk. Seriously. But sometimes you really have to hunt around for it, and you can't have it open on your bench next to you, like you can with a book. So I'm definitely not saying that the books aren't valuable. Just saying read your ShopTalk too :D

Mike
 
Don't forget the Jonesy tutorial.
http://www.hossom.com/tutorial/jonesy/

I agree with Blue Dragon. You will learn a lot about the process taking it slow with files. I recommend getting a 10" Magic-cut file, some machinist files of various shapes and sizes (I found some at a flea market for $2 each) as well as some chain saw files for filework and setting plunge lines. They should work well for you.
 
One way to go is to start with knife kits, It doesn't require a lot of expensive tools to start and the kits are not very expensive.. check out knifekits.com,texasknifemakers supply or kovals.. good luck..:cool:
 
Because you are one of the smart young knife aficionados - you filled out your profile!!!
Because you did, we know that you are a young student that is interested in theater.AND that you live in Alabama.
In June ,from the 8th to the 10th, the 2007 Blade Show will be held in Atlanta.You absolutely must plan to go. There will be more suppliers than you could ever hope to meet, books, kits, blades,and demos..... and you can meet many of the great makers you read about on these forums and in the magazines. A trip to the Blade show will accelerate your learning curve a lot.
Welcome to the BF. Stacy
 
Paul
I think the Southern Blade Smiths are having a Hammer-in in the spring, in Fla (panhandle). I would be a couple hours south of you, but well worth the ride.At 15 you may have to get your folks to bring you. The Guys and gals are very freindly, hospitalable and generous with their time and energy.(Heck the entire knifemaking community falls in that description) You can subscribe to the group SouthernBladeSmiths at yahoo groups. Hope to see you there
I second the Atl. Blade show I went and saw Bill Moran and Jay Hendrickson(sp) lecture on forging a blade, Bob Dozier on Grinding. Like a kid in a candy store
Tom
So.Ga.
 
If I were just 15 years old and wanted to make a knife?

I would start with the Texas knifemakers Supply website and order a "knife kit"
It comes with the knife already finished and all I need to do is attach the handle and pound a few pins into position.

A little hand-sanding and I would have my first knife!

Knife kits are cheap, easy, and you can do them without power tools.
 
If I were just 15 years old and wanted to make a knife?

I would start with the Texas knifemakers Supply website and order a "knife kit"
It comes with the knife already finished and all I need to do is attach the handle and pound a few pins into position.

A little hand-sanding and I would have my first knife!

Knife kits are cheap, easy, and you can do them without power tools.

What he said. Then sell the knife. Repeat as necessary and you'll make some money to expand if you choose to.

Don't be disappointed if your first efforts aren't what you had in mind. The difference between your first knife and your tenth knife will amaze you. I don't mean to get too philosophical here but you'll see that too many people give up after the first try (not just knives) because of unreasonable expectations. The excellent knives you see from the makers around here are made by people who have stuck to it for many years and will admit that they are still making mistakes and still learning - myself first among them. Nothing beats persistence.

You might want to develop your sheath making skills also. Everyone will want a sheath for their knife. You can get the necessary tools for leatherworking very inexpensively. A day may come when 1) you don't want to pay someone else to make your sheaths, 2) you can't find someone who will do the work at a low enough cost or with the quality you want, or 3) you don't want to wait for someone else to get around to doing your sheath. Sheath making can be satisfying and a nice break from knife making once in a while.

Reading about knifemaking is important but it will mean a lot more when you actually make something.
 
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