New backspring?

Discussion in 'Shop Talk - BladeSmith Questions and Answers' started by SnackPack, Dec 2, 2020.

  1. SnackPack

    SnackPack Gold Member Gold Member

    234
    Nov 21, 2019
    Kind of a newbie question here. I have a GEC made knife that I love, but it’s got a couple things I’d like to see if a knife maker could iron out.

    The pull is very soft, the backspring has a good pop to it however. Also when the blade is out and snapped in place, when I go to close the knife it almost ‘pops’ free if the open position. Such as if the blade over traveled and is binding on the backspring.

    Are there any knifemakers among us that would be willing to take a look at it, and perhaps even fashion a new backspring for the knife?

    Thanks a lot in advance!

    Zac
     
  2. Signalprick

    Signalprick Jason Ritchie - Ritchie Handmade Knives Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Apr 3, 2009
    If its stock I'd contact GEC for warranty work. ;)
     
  3. Lee Hester

    Lee Hester

    64
    May 4, 2011
    I can't speak for everyone, but making a new backspring would involve shaping, surface grinding, hardening, and tempering, and final fit-up, requiring someone to take the whole knife apart and pin it back together, then likely grind and hand sand most of the thing again for a good finish. It would take a large part of the effort that goes into make an entire slipjoint, so I personally wouldn't invest the time in it, and I don't know if you'd be willing to pay what it would actually cost to do it. In my mind, on a $100-ish production slipjoint, it's not worth it to have a knifemaker work on it. I think Jason's suggestion of contacting GEC is your best bet.
     
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  4. SnackPack

    SnackPack Gold Member Gold Member

    234
    Nov 21, 2019
    Well, it's a Fremont Jack, excellent stag covers so i'd likely be willing to spend it. I may contact GEC and send it away to them, worst they can say is there's nothing they can do for it.
     
    Lee Hester likes this.
  5. SnackPack

    SnackPack Gold Member Gold Member

    234
    Nov 21, 2019
    FYI everyone I think I largely remedied the issue. It seems that the backspring was sticking further down the spine than at the pivot, likely somewhere toward the tip end of the knife. I blew out the length of the spine with compressed air then did a flush with thin lubricant followed by smothering the backspring in mineral oil. It seems to have done the trick. Perhaps there wasn't over travel at all and it was an issue with the spring sticking somewhere along the spine.

    Thanks!
     
    Lee Hester likes this.
  6. Lee Hester

    Lee Hester

    64
    May 4, 2011
    Dang, those GEC-made Northwoods knives are nice! Glad you fixed it!
     

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