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Next Stone

Discussion in 'Maintenance, Tinkering & Embellishment' started by Aerosmith101, Dec 14, 2018.

  1. Aerosmith101

    Aerosmith101

    86
    Oct 28, 2018
    What's a good stone to go to after a Shapton Pro 2000? I've been looking at the chosera 3000, Sharpening Supplies 3000, and the Spyderco UF. I'm open to suggestions other than these though
     
  2. brando555

    brando555 Gold Member Gold Member

    269
    Sep 26, 2018
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2018
  3. Wowbagger

    Wowbagger Basic Member Basic Member

    Sep 20, 2015
    I agree with brando
    I used to go from the Shapton Pro 2,000 to a Norton 4,000 water stone then the Norton 8,000 when I was mixing up brands of stones. Now I go 2,000 Shapton Pro then the 5,000 Shapton Pro then the Shapton Pro 8,000
     
  4. Jcsixx01

    Jcsixx01 Gold Member Gold Member

    191
    Dec 3, 2018
    I have two eschers (natural German Thuringian wet stones) the blue one is about 20-22k grit. The yellow-green one is about 23-25k grit. Silky smooth.

    I also have a beautiful Charnley Forest (deep green w/maroon streaks English oil stone) that is approximately 26k grit. Only use that for Sheffield/French steel or it is too harsh.

    FYI, these stones are for straight razors not knives.
     
  5. Wowbagger

    Wowbagger Basic Member Basic Member

    Sep 20, 2015
    . . . well . . .
    . . .
    that was random.
     
    eKretz likes this.
  6. brando555

    brando555 Gold Member Gold Member

    269
    Sep 26, 2018
    Lol...
     
  7. Aerosmith101

    Aerosmith101

    86
    Oct 28, 2018
    I was considering it at first but everytime I clean the load up from my shapton 2000 with barkeeper's friend it has to be resurfaced and I don't really want to have to deal with that with two stones
     
  8. Jcsixx01

    Jcsixx01 Gold Member Gold Member

    191
    Dec 3, 2018
    Lol, yeah. I had just finished honing a couple of straight razors when I saw the thread.
     
  9. eKretz

    eKretz

    930
    Aug 30, 2009
    You shouldn't need to do that at all. And if I were you I'd stay away from any chemical cleaners on a synthetic water stone. BKF is great for Spyderco fused/sintered hones but I would not use it on anything with a binder. You may well be damaging your hone that way. Your Shapton can be cleaned fairly well by merely running water over it while rubbing with your finger. Even having a little bit of steel left on the surface won't hurt the hone, you don't really even have to clean it. The next honing will remove it and any dull abrasive particles, as does every use of the hone.

    If you want it really clean anyway just use a diamond plate to give it a quick lapping. Keep the stone flat and it won't take much more than a few swipes of a diamond plate to have it completely clean. If you're worried about wearing the hone out, I've been doing this with my Shapton 2k for years and it's not much less in thickness as when new.
     
  10. Wowbagger

    Wowbagger Basic Member Basic Member

    Sep 20, 2015
    I have no Barkeeper's Friend cleanser yet.
    I was thinking that was for removing tarnish from blades we want to stay bright.
    I would recommend getting a Nagura stone to clean the pores with. Preferably a natural one (that's what I use) . . . that and an occasional pass on the diamond plate as eKretz does :thumbsup:
    Good stones take a little care. No big deal / all part of the fun.
     
  11. brando555

    brando555 Gold Member Gold Member

    269
    Sep 26, 2018
    I agree, chemical cleaners aren't really necessary. A little bit of lapping on a diamond plate keeps a stone working like new. It might make a fine stone feel more coarse, but you aren't changing the grit size of the abrasive, so it's all good.
     
  12. Jason B.

    Jason B. KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jun 13, 2007
    You don't clean waterstones, you lap them. Shapton stones are designed to be flat and stay that way as long as possible so make sure you lap your shaptons BEFORE every use. Do not use oils or cleaners on your stones. Cold water only.

    The Atoma 140 is the ideal diamond plate for this task.

    As for stones, like others have said stick with shapton. They work best when used together and the 5k pro is a really awesome stone. Just remember Shapton pro stones are designed for low alloy carbon and stainless steel.
     
    brando555 likes this.
  13. Aerosmith101

    Aerosmith101

    86
    Oct 28, 2018
    Are there any rust erasers that work well for cleaning Shapton stones
     
  14. eKretz

    eKretz

    930
    Aug 30, 2009
    I think a DMT C will erase rust. :D
     
  15. Jason B.

    Jason B. KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jun 13, 2007
    The DMT Coarse is not a lapping plate and will be quickly destroyed by a Shapton.

    You LAP waterstones. No cleaners, no rust erasers just a diamond plate.
     
  16. cbwx34

    cbwx34

    Dec 27, 2004
    For the most part I agree that lapping is the best medicine, however I’ve used a rust eraser on ceramics, and found they also do a quick job of cleaning a waterstone that might quickly load up, but doesn’t really need to be lapped. Especially when you move into the finer grit stones. I can “refresh” a stone with minimal time and effort during sharpening, vs. lapping it.

    The 2-pack ones (some have the name Sabitoru in them on Amazon, to get an idea of which ones), have worked well for me. Pretty inexpensive solution to try... see if it works for you.

    But lapping still needs to be done occasionally... this doesn’t replace it.
     
  17. brando555

    brando555 Gold Member Gold Member

    269
    Sep 26, 2018
    Yeah, I guess its a matter of preference and can depend on the type of stone. With my Edge Pro stones, I usually lap them every other sharpening session. In between I can usually keep them in usuable condition by running them under water and scrubbing them with a toothbrush to remove as much load up as possible. It's just a lot less time consuming, but if I lap them regularly it doesn't take much to get them flat and working like new.
     

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