Ordered 1st Straight Razor, Needs Work Though

Joined
Oct 28, 2013
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Well, I pulled the trigger on a old straight razor. I know the brand should be good, but I don't know how good this specific model is and I'm not sure about the best way to repair the chipped edge and clean it up. Any insight into the razor and the best way to get it ready to shave would be appreciated.

Also, KN4WD, if you don't mind I wanted to ask you something. Could you email me?

As far as the razor itself. It is stamped "50" followed by the "twins" logo. It then says "J.A.HENCKELS.TWINWORKS" on the first line then "SOLINGEN.GERMANY".

It hasn't been shipped yet, but here are a few of the listing pictures.






 
All Henkels are great.
You will have to fix the chipping and set the bevel. Judging by the size of those chips, you will run into the stabilizers before you remove them. If while honing you start getting inot those stabilizers, to make your life easier, grind them a little to move them up then the heel area will be easier to work.
 
All Henkels are great.
You will have to fix the chipping and set the bevel. Judging by the size of those chips, you will run into the stabilizers before you remove them. If while honing you start getting inot those stabilizers, to make your life easier, grind them a little to move them up then the heel area will be easier to work.

Yeah I noticed if it was going to have a 'useable curve' to it, I would probably have to take some of the stabilizer? off. If I think I might damage it though, I may send it to one of our knifemakers here that has worked with razors would be willing to fix it.
I wanted to get one that didn't need any work, but I think I got a pretty good deal on this one (I may be completely wrong though).

Would it be better to keep as much of the original edge as possible and bring the heel up some, or move most of the bevel/edge up and remove as little of the heel as possible??
 
Yeah I noticed if it was going to have a 'useable curve' to it, I would probably have to take some of the stabilizer? off. If I think I might damage it though, I may send it to one of our knifemakers here that has worked with razors would be willing to fix it.
I wanted to get one that didn't need any work, but I think I got a pretty good deal on this one (I may be completely wrong though).

Would it be better to keep as much of the original edge as possible and bring the heel up some, or move most of the bevel/edge up and remove as little of the heel as possible??

The way I'd go about it is to start honing and if/when you start getting into the stabilizer, just bring the heel up to clear the edge so you can continue honing without having to grind on the stabilizer.

Here is what the fix should look like, again if you have to go there after you start honing the blade. You can bring the heel up by using a diamond plate and carefully grinding the heel to shape. Another way to do it is with a Dremel, that is riskier, but if you are adept with the tool it will take no time to do. The fix is simple and takes 5-10 min at most, it is definitely no worth sending out to have it fixed.

 
I don't really use the heel right there, so if it was me, I'd just hone the rest of the blade, make sure there were no burrs or sharp corners there, and just use it.
 
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