Paul Chen Hanwei Sheffield Style Stag Folder

JPD1998

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Oct 18, 2004
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A few weeks ago I began looking for a stag traditional style folder for my collection. I was browsing the inventory of some of my favorite vendors and found the Paul Chen stag folder. It was a little more than I wanted to spend, but I also never saw anything like it before.

I asked for some opinions here and the responders who had seen or handled one said it was nice so I decided to take a chance.

Whenever I buy a knife sight unseen, I make a mental picture of what to expect. Then rate the knife above, at, or below expectations. This one is definitely above my expectations. The folder is a perfect fusion between modern and traditional styling. The Wharncliffe blade is both practical for most chores and just looks cool. You can see the blade was painstakingly polished in a brushed style in two directions (vertically at the cutting edge, horizontally near the tang and around the edges).

It has an open design like a modern folder and a locking system that is truly unique. I included a picture because it’s hard to describe. Basically the stud acts as an opener and a lock release too. The round disk in front of the stud is the locking piece. The locking piece actually turns like a wheel and rides along the bolster as the blade is opened and closed. The disk acts as a detent when the blade is closed.

Overall the fit and finish is perfect, the engraving looks to be hand-done not machine made. I'll use it as a gentlemen’s knife for light chores. I didn’t photograph it with another knife but its’ about the same size as a Kershaw Leek.


Stats:
Made in China by Hanwei
Steel 440C
Blade Length: 2 5/8”
Overall Length: 7”
Weight: 4oz

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;) The engraving is possibly hand-done - it's a lot cheaper over in China.
Very nice looking.
I've seen something similar to the locking system, but I'm not sure where.... CRKT or SOG?
P.S. The "brushed polish" look is from using machines to give the blade a final shaping (horizontally for distal taper, then establishing primary bevel).
 
I've always wanted one of those. I have the Paul Chen Citizen knife, and would like to get one of each of the production folders done by Chen. This one is next on my list.

Daniel
 
I've always wanted one of those. I have the Paul Chen Citizen knife, and would like to get one of each of the production folders done by Chen. This one is next on my list.

Daniel

That's ironic, I'm so pleased with this one, I want to get the Citizen Knife. How do you like it?
 
I'm a bit of a Stag-aholic and this knife looks really good to me.
Nice score.
 
Fantastic collection of bone and stag there! Excellent pix that do justice to the knives,those Barlows are very appealing.
 
If I'm understanding the lock description correctly, it's a Michael Walker design. Columbia River produced it in their BladeLOCK series of knives.

http://www.gunaccessories.com/ColumbiaRiverKnives/BLADLOCK.JPG

I had one of the original BladeLOCKS for awhile--really is one of the neatest and most solid lockups I've ever seen for a folding knife. In this particular case, unfortunately, it was paired with an AUS-6 blade and one of the least ergonomic handles I've ever held. Good to know that the lock is available in something else, though. As far as I can tell, the only way for the lock to fail is for the metal stud that goes through the blade to actually be sheared off, which makes it far superior to liner locks and lockbacks. I think the principle reason it hasn't found a lot of acceptance with manufacturers is that it is a far more complicated (read: expensive) system than the others.
 
I had one of these, which I sold.

Pros:
Very nice blade shape
Engraving is of decent quality and far better than others at comparable price
Stag or amberized bone is attrative and provides a good grip
Good, solid locking system
Long handle provides plenty of leverage

Cons:
Blade grinds very uneven
Knife is heavy (could be a pro for some)
Lock (invented by Michael Walker) is used without acknowlegement and possibly illegally
A heavy, long-ish knife without a clip is a challenge to carry as an EDC


Every now and again, I think of picking one up.
 
If I'm understanding the lock description correctly, it's a Michael Walker design. Columbia River produced it in their BladeLOCK series of knives.

http://www.gunaccessories.com/ColumbiaRiverKnives/BLADLOCK.JPG

I had one of the original BladeLOCKS for awhile--really is one of the neatest and most solid lockups I've ever seen for a folding knife. In this particular case, unfortunately, it was paired with an AUS-6 blade and one of the least ergonomic handles I've ever held. Good to know that the lock is available in something else, though. As far as I can tell, the only way for the lock to fail is for the metal stud that goes through the blade to actually be sheared off, which makes it far superior to liner locks and lockbacks. I think the principle reason it hasn't found a lot of acceptance with manufacturers is that it is a far more complicated (read: expensive) system than the others.


I'm not familiar with the lock on the CRKT product, but the locking piece on this knife is actually the little disk in front of the stud. The disk turns like a wheel along a small track on the inside of the bolster. It sinks into a depression when the blade is opened.

and yes it does look complicated, I opened and closed it several times before I realized the wheel has actually moving.
 
Just got one today through the post. Not too sure about it frankly! The stag scales feel good but mine has a distinct salmon pink tinge,not appealing.MAIN THING is this and it's embarassing: HOW do you close it? No wheel moves etc. Now I've got an accidental fixed-blade, just try posting THIS back to an e-bay seller and I'm not in the US either! Help please....
 
Just got one today through the post. Not too sure about it frankly! The stag scales feel good but mine has a distinct salmon pink tinge,not appealing.MAIN THING is this and it's embarassing: HOW do you close it? No wheel moves etc. Now I've got an accidental fixed-blade, just try posting THIS back to an e-bay seller and I'm not in the US either! Help please....

The thumb-stud releases the lock, push it towards the tip of the blade and the lock will release.

Stag usually gets it's own patina after awhile so maybe the color will soften.
 
After desperate struggling I found the technique needed to shut the knife. In some ways it is good, and the locking system once fathomed is original and functional. The scales I HOPE will lighten or darken (this pink hue is foul!) is there any way I can advance this process? Leaving in sunlight? sweaty palm treatment...The engraving is OK but not very tactile, feels rough.Quite a lot of blade shake when opened too, this doesn't bode well for the future. Steel is sharp certainly and I would not say it is too heavy or bulky for an EDC at all.Really cheap grotesque plastic imitation leather sheath, a thing to be put down the toilet at once! A good attempt at individuality certainly, nice aesthetics true. I also received a Mcusta basic folder in the post, now although it IS a very different kind of knife, it is on every level of quality, finish and assembly far superior.In fact, its opening action and closing, its tight assembly and beautiful finish shows us that Japanese smiths are on a different planet from their Chinese or other counterparts(at least in everyday production knives).I may grow to like this folder IF the gross salmon pink hue mellows down a bit and soon.
 
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