Poisoning Blowgun darts????

Discussion in 'Wilderness & Survival Skills' started by Mykl Clark, Mar 28, 2001.

  1. Mykl Clark

    Mykl Clark Banned by Moderators Banned

    Feb 19, 2000
    Okay I recently bought a blowgun to play around with in the house and although it's not the best it really rocks and I'm getting pretty good. Basically, I was wonderig how to poison a dart for taking very small game such as squirrels and rabbits. A dart frog would be nice but I'm thinking hard to get and probably a bit risky.

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    Mykl
    Do or do not...there is no try.
     
  2. Bugs3x

    Bugs3x

    Feb 21, 2001
    The saliva of Komodo dragons is supposed to be very toxic! [​IMG]

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    Asi es la vida

    Bugs
     
  3. Doc Ron

    Doc Ron

    422
    May 16, 1999
    I know some poisons that will work but I really want you to think about it. The poison dart is like a land mine. Many of the poisons are deadly long after you blow the dart. Any person, pet, child can be killed or disabled by the poison. Once a dart is loosed, if you miss the target you lose the dart. In the jungle this is not so big a deal as the conditions can reduce most poisons to nothing in hours or days but in normal climates the poisons might linger for years.

    Sorry if I labored the point. [​IMG]

    Ron

     
    Pomsbz likes this.
  4. Mykl Clark

    Mykl Clark Banned by Moderators Banned

    Feb 19, 2000
    Oh I doubt that I'll ever actually poison a dart I just want to know how it could be done with in your own home.
     
  5. e_utopia

    e_utopia

    Feb 7, 2000
    Bugs, the saliva is actually biologically toxic (bacteria), not chemically toxic, so I don't think Mkyl wants to eat whatever gets hit by it.

    --JB
     
  6. Bagheera

    Bagheera

    957
    Oct 6, 1998
    Hi,

    Get a bigger blowgun 2" diameter and practice...practice.. if you can shoot that dart with acceptable velocity you don't need poisen anymore it'll nock them dead [​IMG]

    Seriously,the only small" caliber blowgun that I would use is a .22 rimfire (contender with riflestock or ruger 10/22) it has a slow working poison tipped dart (lead kills slowly [​IMG] ) but if you place it accurately enough it's a quiet fast killing "poison" [​IMG] also bloowing it doesn't tire and works almost everytime and is a lot more accurate and carries at least 100 yards [​IMG]

    If you're really into poison try boiling down a package of tobacco in some water until you get a thick paste, this should contain enough nicotine to get the target (or yourself ) into trouble as nicotine is a very strong nerve agent.

    Best scouting wishes from Holland,

    Bagheera

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  7. Bugs3x

    Bugs3x

    Feb 21, 2001
    e_utopia -- I know. It was an effort at humor, based on Mykle's comment on obtaining tree frogs to be dangerous and his signature. Either substance would be terribly expensive, difficult, and in the case of Komodo dragons, very dangerous to obtain.

    Sorry, will work on my delivery.

    It does strike me though, that one should be very careful about any poison used for obtaining game. I would guess that some agents, even though they work neurologically, could still harm someone if ingested.


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    Asi es la vida

    Bugs
     
  8. shadowfax

    shadowfax

    172
    Jan 29, 2001
    I got the joke. It took me a minute of thinking something along the lines of "if you can get the saliva of a komodo dragon without getting killed, you don't NEED a blowgun, poisoned or otherwise. Then I figured it out ;)

     
  9. Jeff Clark

    Jeff Clark

    Apr 27, 1999
    Poisoned darts are not very practical for rabbits since they disappear down holes. Squirrels you can generally knock down without the poison. I used to make darts using coat hanger wire as the last 3" segment and a hollow tube behind. I would make a minature broadhead tip by hammering the wire flat for about 1/2" then grinding to an arrowhead shape and sharpening. The hammering work-hardens the mild steel pretty well. This worked well on squirrels and doves.

    The following information is for academic and literary interest only:

    What poison darts are traditionally used for is large arboreal creatures like apes or monkeys. When hit with a dart they climb trees, only to fall out later. They could also work on some large herbivore like a deer which would not run too far after getting hit by a dart. It would just think that it had been bit by a horsefly or something.

    In the wilds the only thing I can think of that you might find is Tree Tobacco (nicotiana glaucus I think) with yellow tubular flowers. This is very high in nicotine alkaloids and the chemicals could be leached with hot water and concentrated by evaporation. You can also buy concentrated nicotine for use as an insecticide.

    I suspect that some places in the Virginia suburbs you might run across a bush called akocanthera venata (sp?) aka bushman's arrow poison bush. This is an African import that is fairly similar to strichnos toxifera that curare comes from. The sap of this plant takes very little processing to be used on darts.

    There is always good old fashioned potassium cyanide from the local chemical supply store.

    I don't think I'd feel very comfortable eating anything killed with one of these concoctions. I would also feel very nervous if I lost a dart. It is very easy to have an accident with one of these substances and kill or blind yourself. I wouldn't mess around with them.


    [This message has been edited by Jeff Clark (edited 03-30-2001).]
     
  10. Mykl Clark

    Mykl Clark Banned by Moderators Banned

    Feb 19, 2000
    Thanks everybody good answers.

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    Mykl
    Do or do not...there is no try.
     
  11. K Williams

    K Williams Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 17, 1998
  12. AVGDUMMY

    AVGDUMMY

    1
    Mar 17, 2013
    I've used extra strenght orajel.. the "caine" part of the ingredients, along with shock from bein impaled, induce a massive heart attack in the small critters. and perfectly safe to eat. even raw if needs be :)
     
  13. Bigfattyt

    Bigfattyt Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 23, 2007
    Iocaine powder and be done with it.
     
  14. Codger_64

    Codger_64 Moderator Moderator

    Oct 8, 2004
    Twelve year old necrothread? It isn't a record but...
     
  15. desmobob

    desmobob

    May 5, 2003
    Not a record but certainly not average.... and it was AVGDUMMY's very first post! I suspect he's not your average dummy at all. ;-)

    Stay sharp,
    desmobob
     
  16. Stroudless

    Stroudless

    6
    Dec 3, 2015
    Some research on arrow poisons took me here for some interesting notes and wise counsel, so I'll exhume the necro thread to bring it up to a full 16 years.

    The three most important things to remember are safety, Safety, SAFETY!

    Safety #1 - Always use a blowgun that is longer than the distance from your mouth to your own foot, and remember: to fire, exhale, DON'T INHALE!

    Safety #2 - If you plan to eat what you kill, seek out poisons that will be denatured (i.e., deactivated) by cooking, or at least diluted enough (e.g., in a stew) that they will never reach the diner at a concentration high enough to be dangerous. Some deadly blood poisons can be eaten safety, even without cooking or dilution, but others are systemic poisons still dangerous upon digestion, even AFTER cooking and/or dilution.

    Safety #3 - Consider the environmental hazard of a lost dart. Children or cute, fuzzy kittens may frolic barefoot tomorrow where you hunted varmints yesterday! Some poisons will degrade pretty quickly when exposed to oxygen, water, sunlight, etc., while others are quite persistent. The persistent kinds are generally the least safe for eating, so choose something that will degrade biologically, thermally, or in direct sunlight if at all possible.

    With a degradable poison, you probably can't keep it active in long storage, but you really don't want to store it on pointy things like darts anyway. Ideally, you would procure / prepare the poison right before the hunt, dip the dart tip just before (very carefully) inserting it into your blowgun, then a-hunting ye shall go. If you finish your day of hunting with a tipped dart still loaded, dispose of it carefully, like maybe via a gentle shot into a pot of water that you will then boil, then rinse the blowgun out with the boiling water. Most people can and will use plenty of caution when they first load the blowgun, but it's much easier to come back to that blowgun a few weeks or months later and forget what it was loaded with last time. Or maybe your semi-retarded little brother / child / neighbor is the next guy to give the blowgun a try, and maybe he thinks it would be amusing to try it out on your rear end, the family dog, a cute, fuzzy kitten, etc., etc.

    Also, avoid poisons known to transfer through unbroken skin. If you scratch yourself with a dart properly loaded to bring down a squirrel, chances are you'll live. But if you spill the whole bottle on your hand, and it's of a type that readily transfers through human skin, you may not. Same caution for inhalation hazards.

    Above all, DO YOUR RESEARCH. Even with a dozen college chemistry courses behind me (and all A's except for f***ing O-Chem Lab 2), I approach the preparation and use of such materials with great care and more than a little fear. To be useful on the tip of a dart, a poison must be so CONCENTRATED that it becomes far more dangerous than the exact same compound might be in, say, a diluted rodent killer bait, a lawn & garden pesticide, or (as in the case with nicotine) in a cigarette. This is why I will make no specific recommendations. Once you've identified some candidates, there are plenty of useful references on the Internet and at the local Library to determine whether a given candidate will suit your needs, and, if so, what is needed to handle it safely. But I'll also join those who tactfully suggest that the game you seek can be brought down by purely ballistic projectiles; no need to resort to chemical warfare!
     
  17. longit

    longit

    13
    Oct 9, 2017
    you dont need to poison them. . A guy (tim wells?) on youtube takes goats, hogs, baboons with plain bladed blowgun darts. A 1/4" hole in a vital organ is fatal, bro. It' just a question of how far the critter runs after being hit.
     
  18. seabil

    seabil

    168
    Apr 8, 2015
    That nicotine solution is a powerful poison. Not sure if would work on a dart but lethal if some is ingested. A little on a finger to mouth or food. Wiki says can be absorbed thru skin. Also remember if you did a poison dart with one of the poison dart poisons - one poke, scratch or cut.....☠️ Any knife never nicked you? I think poison was not widely used to hunt because it can get the hunter just as easily.
     
    Bradenk1987 likes this.
  19. gadgetgeek

    gadgetgeek

    May 19, 2007
    But if your method has a significant chance of only wounding an animal, or leaving it well enough to get away that you can't harvest it, then its at worst unethical, at best a waste of your effort. Poison is the "force multiplier" for those who hunt with the knowledge that the high likelihood is that they will only wound. Need to? no, but when everything else is against success, should you? Might be a different answer. I can't see myself relying on a 1/4 inch blade to do enough damage to ethically take any animal, and if I'm hunting to eat, you won't see it on youtube. Self-endorsement is no recommendation.....bro.
     
    LEGION 12 likes this.
  20. longit

    longit

    13
    Oct 9, 2017
    and you believe that such is the OP's concern? :) a 223 ball rd does no more damage than the blowgun dart, once the range has reduced the velocity below 2000 fps. The guy who can't get a good hit best stick to traps and nets.
     

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