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Question About Buck Knife Model 119 "Special"

Joined
Sep 25, 2006
Messages
6
Hello Everybody!
I have a question about the Buck Knives Model 119 "Special". This knife has a 6 inch blade, but did Buck ever make one with a 7 or an 8 or a 9 inch blade? Have any other knife companies made or still make a similar looking knife? The reason why I'm asking about this particular knife is because there is a certain popular horror movie franchise that had a similar looking knife pictured on one of their poster's artwork. But the knife pictured on the poster artwork had a real long "blood groove" in the knife blade. The Buck Model 119 "Special" has a small "blood groove". Also, what is the purpose of a "blood groove"? I would really appreciate it if somebody could answer my questions. Thanks. Take care. Later.
 
Hello Everybody!
I have a question about the Buck Knives Model 119 "Special". This knife has a 6 inch blade, but did Buck ever make one with a 7 or an 8 or a 9 inch blade? Have any other knife companies made or still make a similar looking knife? The reason why I'm asking about this particular knife is because there is a certain popular horror movie franchise that had a similar looking knife pictured on one of their poster's artwork. But the knife pictured on the poster artwork had a real long "blood groove" in the knife blade. The Buck Model 119 "Special" has a small "blood groove". Also, what is the purpose of a "blood groove"? I would really appreciate it if somebody could answer my questions. Thanks. Take care. Later.

A blood grove fills with blood after it is stabbed into flesh ( animal/human ) so the blade releases easier. I think buck did make some larger 119s at one time. Movies have access to all types of knives custom, old ,new. Sometimes they are not easy to obtain.
 
Actually, the 'blood groove' has nothing to do with blood. I'll let others weigh in here with the applied physics, etc., of this feature.
 
I'm not a Buck expert i only have the Buck 119 and a 124. Check the Buck forum for those with extensive Buck knowledge.
http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=701

However i do know that the Buck general 120 is basically a 119 special with a 7 and a half inch blade. Or you could say the 119 is a shortened 120. lol.
Anyway its out of general production now, however Cabelas has a deal with Buck and they periodically offer a Cabelas/Buck version. Check there it may be available again.
 
Actually, the 'blood groove' has nothing to do with blood. I'll let others weigh in here with the applied physics, etc., of this feature.

yes A blood grove was designed with blood in mind. they allow blood (liquid)
to form around the blade allowing a easier extraction. It is a simple effective design.

a lot military bayonets have this feature. Since they are designed to be used
on the end of a rife for thrusting into the enemy.
 
I have a question about the Buck Knives Model 119 "Special". This knife has a 6 inch blade, but did Buck ever make one with a 7 or an 8 or a 9 inch blade?
Yep, there's the Buck General (Model #120) mentioned above. The knife outline is very similar, only larger. There are also at least two smaller models too with the same style, the Woodsman and Pathfinder.

I wouldn't be suprised if some of the cheap import companies make a 119 knockoff, and I wouldn't be suprised if the movie studios have a pile of phony 119-looking knives for props.

Noss4,
The real name for a "blood groove" is "Fuller", a knife feature that has nothing to do with blood. The phrase "blood groove" was created for advertising/fantasy purposes. Here's an excellent explanation, at the Knife Encylodepia section at AG Russell's website:
http://www.agrussell.com/knife_information/knife_encyclopedia/articles/blood_groove.html

-Bob
 
I looked on that link. This is Joes opinion but my earlier post is it interned purpose. If if works or not I don't know that. I have never stabbed into a person or animal with a knife that did or didn't have a blood grove if it was for something else it would be called something else. it would be called a fuller grove but it is not called a "Fuller" grove. He says he changed the name himself.

I can see a flame war brewing over this. That I am taking no part in.
 
Fullers were not "blood grooves" or there to "break the suction" or for some other grisly purpose. They served a very important structural function. That's all. I have spent the last 27 years studying this and I can prove it beyond any doubt...
That's from Joe Talmadge, and good enough for me.

It would be interesting to investigate the earliest use of the terms "fuller" and "blood groove". I think the feature itself pre-dates either name.

From the Gerber Knives website:
Blood Groove
A groove in the knife blade that makes the instrument lighter and stiffer, also referred to as "Fuller." A popular misconception holds that the blood groove's purpose is to break the vacuum when the blade is being extracted from a victim's body. In fact, no such vacuum occurs.

From Arms and Armoury glossary:
Blood Channel, Blood Groove: The erroneous name given to the fuller of a sword blade by more fanciful modern writers.

You'll believe what you want to...
-Bob
 
I stand corrected. however If there are tests done on a blood grove to see if it works or not to remove a blade. Then it stands to reason that many have wounded about this purpose. and have designed many knives for this intended purpose.

Now don't you feel better ?
 
If there are tests done on a blood grove to see if it works or not to remove a blade
I suppose you could test the hypothesis with a fluid-filled forensic dummy. I would expect no difference. But it appears it's already been tested:
over and over again people report that there is no
difference whatsoever in the difficulty of withdrawing a knife with a
blood groove vs. one without. This is one theory that has been tested
and found wanting.

-Bob

Added: It is a common misconception, and I wouldn't have known myself if it hadn't been discussed here many times before.
I've felt pretty good all night - a beer or two does that.
 
I suppose you could test the hypothesis with a fluid-filled forensic dummy. I would expect no difference. But it appears it's already been tested:


-Bob

I guess you could. Why not do a test and video it for all to see if you have spent 27 years on this then your own test will benefit you as well as others.

There is always room for another test.
 
Nah, it doesn't really interest me that much. I just posted in this topic because I'm an admirer of the Buck 119 and so the title caught my eye. I'll leave the testing and video-taping up to the experts.

-Bob
 
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