Question: How do you jig bone?

Joined
Mar 4, 1999
Messages
83
If I want to repair an old knife it's often necessary to replace the jigged bone slabs. To do it right the jigging pattern should approximate the original. How was jigging done by manufacturers in the first place? Is there anyplace I can buy authenticly jigged bone for old knives (Case, Remington, KaBar, Schrade etc.) that had distinctive jigging patterns? Did they buy it or make it themselves? I've looked at what the various knife supply dealers sell at shows and it leaves alot to be desired both in the colors and the LAME jigging. I'd spend the money to get the real thing, if not I'd like some ideas on making some. Help
 
Joined
Oct 10, 1998
Messages
634
Check out the book "How to make Folding Knives". A very detailed discription is in it.
 
Joined
Mar 4, 1999
Messages
83
Thanks, I dug that one off the shelf and read it. I was curious whether a machine of some sort was used to do the jigging on the various factories handle slabs. I mean they didn't do sucha mundane, gritty, unhealthy and possibly smelly task by hand did they? So how did they create millions of slabs of distinctively jigged bone and is there any way I can get the real thing. I'd rather buy it if I can, frankly.

The bone on old Remingtons is SO NICE and Case greenbone is just lovely - I've got 60+ year old knives that look like they were made yesterday. So I know a lot of it holds up pretty well, but those knives that had the stuff that didn't deserve to be restored in a manner that shows respect - sorta like what is done to 60's muscle cars and old English motorcyles now.

I realize that improving these knives also enhances their value but my primary motive is to prevent further deterioration and occasionally slice something non-acidic with one of 'em.

If I were going to carry one of these I might rehandle it in micarta, cocobolo, ironwood (good looking stuff with some character) or if I wanted to be struck dead - carbon fiber or G10. God save me from most manmade handle materials. Tactical knives are TOUGH, mostly rust-resistant and bigger than I typically need in Chicago in a highrise. I like multitools (Micra on a keychain always) which are more utilitarian than tactical but if I were loading up for Ecuador or Southeast Asia let me at them tough tactical rippers and a Remington shotgun to go with'em.
 
Joined
Oct 7, 1998
Messages
1,437
What kind of dye do you use to color the bone once you've ground the jig-pattern?

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www.wilkins-knives.com


 

RCC

Joined
Jun 27, 1999
Messages
172
A the best dye we have ever found when trying to color bone, leather etc. (anything that has a natural oil basically) is potassium permaginate.

Give it a shot sometime tell me the results.

RCC
www.knifesupplies.com
 
Joined
May 18, 1999
Messages
15,393
:
You ain't gonna believe this,but I colored some bone one time with grass cippings.I was just a kid and had made myself a bone knife with a wood handle. I got some grass clipings and put them in an old bucket with some water.It was thick and soupy after mashing and shredding the grass.It would almost be like Split Pea Soup.
It soaked into the bone nicely. Like so many other things I had when I was a kid it disappeared one day. I don't know how long it would last,but it is a natural material and you might like it if you tried it.
The cost is nice too.
smile.gif


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>>>>---¥vsa---->®
The civilized man sleeps behind locked doors in the city while the naked savage sleeps (with a knife) in a open hut in the jungle.
 
Joined
Mar 18, 1999
Messages
2,109
To colour or dye bone, I have had very good success with a leather dye or more specifically, what is referred to as an aniline dye. Ritz dye works as well. I have also used (believe it or not) coffee.

CLWilkins
 

CAL

Joined
Aug 3, 1999
Messages
123
CL Where can I get aniline dye??? I have been looking for a source for years with no luck. HELP!!
 
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