Recommendation for a light tomahawk...

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I've read through many many pages...I don't see anything like what I'm looking for:

One piece full forged blade/handle construction. I can wrap the handle, but G-10 or Micarta would be good. A modified Estwing Carpenter looks somewhat close but also heavy. 20oz would be ideal.

A flat edge shaped blade...and unlike a narrow CS Trail Hawk. Spike or no spike is fine, bu a hammer or flat back would be preferred?..but I want a wider blade like a roofer/carpenter.

The hard part...under $100. It's going to live in the truck as a multi-use tool.

Thoughts?
 
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VaughanMfg, Solid Steel Camp Axe with sheath, $34.20, est. 26 oz.

Your construction specs with relatively light weight, IMO, point to either one piece camp axes or tactical hawks that are significantly more than $100.
That has been your experience.
 
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Burke

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RMJ designed Kangee or Chogan. 104 at a shop that sells cutlery...
 
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Forged is the issue. At the price point it will be difficult. A lot of tools used to pry aren't forged - the average crowbar is hot stamped to shape the ends, then bent. Stanley FUBAR is cast. In a light tool, forged is nice, but it's not cheap.

Review your specs and surf the net some more (images is faster than web,) see what might be inline with your pricing. I'd love to get a RMJ forged hawk, I just won't pay the price for a tool I'm going to let sit for weeks at a time. So, I went for a flat hawk cut from plate with a handle roll formed into a round shape and welded. Many of the same features, $65. Not as pretty, no, just as useful, quite likely.

When price is an important point of the purchasing decision you have to compromise something. If the requirement is forged, then it has to be asked, would that specific job be handled better with something built for it, like a crowbar? Jaws of Life? A hawk is by nature a light small tool compared to a crash axe or Halligan. If it has to be forged, then the price has to go up.
 
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I'm still not seeing anything that's a good fit. The CRKT option comes close but the reviews don't cast a favorable light on the quality...I shouldn't need to locite screws at that price point. What if I go up to $150? I see a few perfect pieces but I won't spend $400 on something that's going to live in my BOB. Maybe I'll stick with a folding saw and my Kershaw Outcast.
 
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So, I went for a flat hawk cut from plate with a handle roll formed into a round shape and welded. Many of the same features, $65. Not as pretty, no, just as useful, quite likely.

Could you name it please mate?
 
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I'm still not seeing anything that's a good fit. The CRKT option comes close but the reviews don't cast a favorable light on the quality...I shouldn't need to locite screws at that price point. What if I go up to $150? I see a few perfect pieces but I won't spend $400 on something that's going to live in my BOB. Maybe I'll stick with a folding saw and my Kershaw Outcast.

You said that you can wrap the handle. Just take off the slabs off the chogan and wrap it. I've had no problem with my handle slabs coming loose........even if they did, 5 minutes with the loc tite and you won't have to worry about it again.
 

Burke

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I'm still not seeing anything that's a good fit. The CRKT option comes close but the reviews don't cast a favorable light on the quality...I shouldn't need to locite screws at that price point. What if I go up to $150? I see a few perfect pieces but I won't spend $400 on something that's going to live in my BOB. Maybe I'll stick with a folding saw and my Kershaw Outcast.
Just curious - what are you seeing as complaints about the quality on the CRKT offerings? I haven't done any actual work with mine yet that would reveal heat treat problems but the fit, finish, etc are all more than adequate and the sheath is quite good.

Do any of the Condor offerings appeal to you? I have no experience with them but they seem to be in the vein of what you're looking for.

If you're willing to relax your requirements for one-piece design a whole world of reasonably priced customs opens up to you for around the 150 mark.
 
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The complaint was in a Youtube video where a fellow chops through a 7-8 inch log over the course of a few minutes. I agree about the concession to a wood handle. I have a Wetterlings Carpenter that chops like no bodies business but it's large and heavy...two much for one hand and not quite enough for two. I usually kneel when felling a tree which detracts from my swing.

I was thinking something more svelte for strapping to a day pack. And hoping for something less "tactical" in appearance...but I could always paint whatever I get to an earth tone.
 
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The Kangee just wasn't designed to chop wood, not the best edge for that. There are other tomahawk makers, like Wolf Creek Forge, that offer better wood chopping tomahawks for less than $100, but they have wooden handles.
Even if you modify the edge of a Kangee(or similar tactical hawk) you still end up with a short and heavier handle, vs wood.
 
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The Kangee just wasn't designed to chop wood, not the best edge for that. There are other tomahawk makers, like Wolf Creek Forge, that offer better wood chopping tomahawks for less than $100, but they have wooden handles.
Even if you modify the edge of a Kangee(or similar tactical hawk) you still end up with a short and heavier handle, vs wood.

True, however I'm pretty surprised on how well it does handle wood for being a breaching/fighting designed tomahawk. I got mine a week or so ago and considering the different hawks I've used and tested, I'm thrilled with how well the Kangee performs. Took mine out this weekend on a few logs and it threw chips pretty well. So far, I'm super impressed with the Kangee.
 
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.......also took the Kangee to an old frying pan and a couple 1 inch diameter steel bars. Tore the frying pan to pieces and cut nice deep gouges in the steel bar. No chips or rolls. Just dulled the edge a little. Anyway.......back on topic
 
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I don't expect this pattern hawk to cut wood well at all. I know the light weight and design style gives up a lot. What I do anticipate is a fast one handed tool.
 
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Hammer or Spike? That is a significant issue, it makes up a sizeable proportion of the intended alternate work. That needs to be settled, not shrugged off. It's the other side of the hawk - 50% if you see it that way - and certainly getting the wrong one for most of what you might do with it would be unsettling. We can't say which is better for someone else. That choice needs to be resolved individually. There are certainly pros and cons both ways - but one is not "best," just better for that users needs.

I'd be more concerned about hammer or spike than forged if price is still a requirement. Again, it's a matter of picking out the best compromise, not trying to find a hawk that likely doesn't exist. If there was somebody forging one and selling it for under $100, I suspect we'd all be able to name it in a New York minute. I also think that finding a $100 used RMJ isn't likely going to happen, either.

I wouldn't expect any hawk to cut wood as well as a felling axe, either. But you have guys constantly posting up that distraction because they are in it for the oneupmanship, or lack reading comprehension. The thread title is pretty clear, apparently they don't understand that a hawk naturally gives up massive chopping qualities to give up pounds of weight. That is the entire point - to have a light hawk rather than a 4 pound 28'+ axe. The hawk would likely fit inside the BOB, too.
 
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I wouldn't expect any hawk to cut wood as well as a felling axe, either. But you have guys constantly posting up that distraction because they are in it for the oneupmanship, or lack reading comprehension. The thread title is pretty clear, apparently they don't understand that a hawk naturally gives up massive chopping qualities to give up pounds of weight. That is the entire point - to have a light hawk rather than a 4 pound 28'+ axe. The hawk would likely fit inside the BOB, too.

The OP stated that he wanted a "multi-use tool", and I do think chopping wood fits in that description. When he says he'll stick to a folding saw I can't help but think he's talking about wood processing. If he had stated a specific and different use, I would not have mentioned chopping wood.
So, where's my lack of reading comprehension?
 
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