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Repair Question

Discussion in 'Maintenance, Tinkering & Embellishment' started by Long.Rider, Aug 3, 2018.

  1. Long.Rider

    Long.Rider

    281
    Dec 10, 2008
    I made the grievous mistake of allowing a day laborer to use my Kershaw D2 Outcast. He chipped the holy Be-Jesus out of it. In all my life I have never chipped a knife this badly. I have been sharpening it with the coarsest stones I have to no avail. So I going to take a file to it. I am unsure if I should just sharpen it with the file or if I should just file the blade edge off down past the chips and than sharpen it. Any opinions suggestions. Please do not berate be for being a moron and letting a stranger use my knife. Believe me I know that.
     
    Wowbagger likes this.
  2. PeterS84

    PeterS84 Sharpening addict, collector of super steels Platinum Member

    179
    May 9, 2018
    If you file it down to effectively "remove" the chipped bevel and then try to put a new bevel on it after you've flattened that out you're going to be in for a whale of a sharpening project, IMO. If it were me, I would consider using a slow speed belt grinder (if you have one). If not, using the file to "sharpen" it might be the best alternative. Just out of curiosity, how course is your most course stone? I've been able to sharpen out some pretty awful edge damage with a DMT XXC without too much difficulty.
     
  3. Bill DeShivs

    Bill DeShivs KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jun 6, 2000
    Using a file to set bevels should be common practice.
    "Sharpen" it with the file, and then use stones to refine the edge.
     
    willc likes this.
  4. David Martin

    David Martin Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    All good. But I am curious as well on what is the coarse stone your using? DM
     
  5. Wowbagger

    Wowbagger Basic Member Basic Member

    Sep 20, 2015
    I would call this a good "reason" to buy a new knife !
    You can just sharpen what is left of the edge and save it for a loaner for the next sweet pea that wants to borrow your knife.

    Or sharpen the chipped areas and call it a combination edge ( you know . . . part plain edge, part serrated. You always wanted a wire stipper in your knife, right ? Now you have that to !
    Isn't it a wonderful day ? A new knife to shop for and some nice "enhancements" to your EDC. :thumbsup:
     
  6. jpm2

    jpm2

    Nov 19, 2014
    If I can sharpen heat treated D2 with a regular file, I'd throw it in the trash.
     
    Keith Nix likes this.
  7. Wowbagger

    Wowbagger Basic Member Basic Member

    Sep 20, 2015
    There's that.
    I was thinking no way can one file it.
    Also there is a chance that once all the metal is removed to get the chipped areas out . . . if one isn't careful . . . the tip could end up above the handle.

    For instance, this is an exception, but when this knife is closed the tip is . . .
    IMG_4760.JPG

    only 0.70 mm below the handle surface. The amount demonstrated by the little rectangular nub on the end of this bar (which is a depth gauge on a Mitutoyo Dial Indicator).
    It might not take much sharpening in the tip area to bring the point even closer to the surface of the handle. Depends on the way the knife is configured . . . I'm just saying.
    IMG_4047.jpg
     
  8. palmerdl

    palmerdl Gold Member Gold Member

    259
    Jan 26, 2009
    Seriously? If you can sharpen it by any standard method, a file will cut it.
     
  9. Bill DeShivs

    Bill DeShivs KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jun 6, 2000
    I didn't see the D2 part.
    No, you can't cut D2 with a file.
     
    Keith Nix likes this.
  10. palmerdl

    palmerdl Gold Member Gold Member

    259
    Jan 26, 2009
    I stand corrected. Having never sharpened a knife, other than a machete, with a file I assumed if stones or abrasive would cut it so would a file. I don't think I'll go try it on a D2 knife, either. The A-S-S-U-M-E idiom rears it's ugly head... again.
     
    jpm2 likes this.
  11. willc

    willc Gold Member Gold Member

    928
    Aug 13, 2013
    You may be able to file it out.
    Kershaw was never known for pushing their HT.
    Even some of the Chinese “D2” is not difficult to sharpen.

    Now if it was Benchmade D2 I would say no way.

    My Adamas is hard even with diamonds.
    Just run the blade over whatever stone you have handy and see what happens then adjust fire from there.
     
  12. jpm2

    jpm2

    Nov 19, 2014
    When it comes to carbide alloyed steels, I have Norton JB8 and Ace hardware coarse silicon carbide bench stones for repairing damage, thinning behind edges, and resetting bevels. Other than powered abrasives, they take off metal faster than anything else I've used, including diamond.
    A file does fine for simple steels in the mid 50's, like machetes, butcher knives, and some traditionals.
     
  13. David Martin

    David Martin Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    jpm, agreed. The ACE hardware stone does cut steel faster than a new x coarse diamond dia plate. DM
     
    willc likes this.
  14. Shoopmonster

    Shoopmonster Gold Member Gold Member

    32
    Aug 26, 2014
    Hand powered is going to take some time, even with some good stones. Powered sharpening might be the way to go.
     
  15. David Martin

    David Martin Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    Yea, with the stone jpm mentions maybe 10 min. to totally rebevel that knife and remove the chip. But does Long Rider do free hand sharpening? DM
     
    jpm2 likes this.
  16. Shoopmonster

    Shoopmonster Gold Member Gold Member

    32
    Aug 26, 2014
    Have you considered contacting warranty? Explain exactly what happened, be up front and see if they can do anything for you? Might cost a little bit, but could save you hassle.
     
  17. Long.Rider

    Long.Rider

    281
    Dec 10, 2008
    Thanks all for the help
    It's one of EdgePro professional original "ultra" course stones that they no longer carry but it is courser than their current 120 stones.
    The only and best reason I have for a new knife is I don't have one or the one I have is so nice I need more than one. But thanks for the entertaining input
    I learned something, you're right a file is worthless on this knife. Something I would be pleased about but right now not so much
    Thanks I need to take a look at that
    As reluctant as I am to using power tools on knives right now that looks like the course I will take
    Thanks I've dealt with Kershaw before, they like most companies do not warranty against abuse and this knife was abused and I've had it for about ten years
     
  18. tiguy7

    tiguy7 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 25, 2008
    3C57EA12-8C09-4B8C-90AE-1B2F2BFB4F90.jpeg
    In order to lower the point on your Benchmade Axis Lock knife, remove material from the area shown. I would remove the blade and use a Diamond coated cylinder in a Dremel tool.
     
  19. tiguy7

    tiguy7 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 25, 2008
    1A601638-D7DE-4350-BEE0-131A1A58F2CF.jpeg I would remove all of the chipped edge with a 60 grit belt running over a contact wheel. The edge should be perpendicular to the belt, and the edge should move from tip to hilt in a sweeping downward motion. Use plenty of water to keep the blade cool to the touch. I would then put a preliminary edge on it using the same belt but pulling the blade across the part of the belt being supported by the platen, edge trailing and 15 degrees off vertical. Again use plenty of water. Once the edge was shaped, I would finish by hand.
     

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