Reprofile Convex Wardog - Help

Discussion in 'Busse Combat Knives' started by Walll, Apr 20, 2020.

  1. Walll

    Walll

    87
    Nov 15, 2010
    Hey guys, so I recently acquired a convex INFI Wardog. I LOVE the ergonomics and size of this knife, however I've been very disappointed with my sharpening results.

    I'm not new to sharpening convexed blades - I can get my convexed Gransfors Bruk axe WAY sharper (shaving sharp) than I can this Wardog when I use the exact same sandpaper and mousepad technique. I'm convinced that this factory convex of my Wardog is far too obtuse (I'm open to other suggestions). How can I go about remedying this? How should I reprofile this knife? I just wish the grind was like my axe... should I use a handheld drill with a spongy pad and some fairly coarse grit sandpaper to thin out the edge?

    Thanks for the help :thumbsup:

    [​IMG]
     
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  2. Ironkid883

    Ironkid883 Gold Member Gold Member

    619
    Jun 29, 2018
    Worksharp ?
     
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  3. jsnell

    jsnell

    345
    Jul 20, 2015
    Yep. Worksharp or cheap harbor freight belt sander. Knock down the shoulder and give er hell.
     
  4. Ironkid883

    Ironkid883 Gold Member Gold Member

    619
    Jun 29, 2018
    I dont have one but have heard they convex all blades gradually .
    So maybe a little bit of slack and a few blue belts must get one to sharpen my camp tramp the strop isnt doin much for it
     
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  5. luethge

    luethge Gold Member Gold Member

    983
    May 16, 2017
    Use a Sharpie to mark the edge, 250 grit - 600 grit (as fine as you want to go), leather, mouse pad or thick cardboard backer ( and strong coffee :thumbsup:). Get ready to spend 2-3 days gently stropping the blade (lightly !! just the weight of the blade itself, pressure added will have the opposite effect of sharpening- will look like a nuclear meltdown treatment of your cutting edge with too much pressure :thumbsdown:). you'll get that thing sharper if you don't think about it too much.. slow and steady. Im sure that is not very helpful.. takes a little patience and you'll get there.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2020
  6. tinfoil hat timmy

    tinfoil hat timmy Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2014
    Use a stone to remove material from BEHIND the edge.

    By behind, I mean above if the knife is held normally.

    I dont use convex sharpening methods anymore because I usually end up with a fat edge behind the sharp edge.

    With a stone I can control the edge way better.

    Try Baryonyx knife company

    He's a member here and sells awesome stones.

    Get the arctic fox.
     
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  7. tinfoil hat timmy

    tinfoil hat timmy Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2014
    I love love LOVE my harbor freight 1x30.
     
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  8. resinguy

    resinguy

    Feb 19, 2006
    This. Many of my Bussekin, especially the larger blades, have benefited from taking down the obtuse shoulder behind/above the edge.
     
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  9. tinfoil hat timmy

    tinfoil hat timmy Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2014
    My original steelheart ergo has had a run in or two with my 1x30. It lost its ass it did.
     
  10. tinfoil hat timmy

    tinfoil hat timmy Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2014
    20200420_102535.jpg
     
  11. Walll

    Walll

    87
    Nov 15, 2010
    Thanks so much for all of the helpful responses folks! I really really appreciate it :)

    Awesome, thanks so much for the suggestion of the stone. I think I'll pick up that arctic fox as I've always wanted a good bench stone.

    So when you say you don't use convex sharpening methods, do you just freehand your desired angle on your convex knives on a stone, so that you don't get that fat edge behind the sharp edge? Do you rock your blade at all on the stone to keep a more deliberate convex shape?

    For removing the material behind the edge with that stone (I'm so excited to try this), would I just lay the blade flat on the stone, tilt up until I hit the shoulder and what I want to remove - before contacting the actual edge (I'm picturing a gap between the edge and the stone, because of the obtuse shoulder that I want to remove) - and then go to town back and forth to thin it out? Flip and repeat?

    Thanks! Love it. Just to make sure, with that sander, to knock down the shoulder would I sharpie the shoulder to know I'm hitting it, then simply (and slowly?) grind it away to thin it out?
     
  12. tinfoil hat timmy

    tinfoil hat timmy Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2014
    Ok. Lots to cover here!

    First. It's awesome that you're excited. Just GO SLOW, and check your work frequently.

    Second. Get a sharpie marker. Color the edge of the blade, where you'd like to remove fat edge syndrome.

    D. Start using the stone with light passes at an angle that places the fat behind the edge, NOT THE ACTUAL CUTTING EDGE, on the stone. Check frequently to see where the marker disappears. That is where the blade is contacting the stone and where material is being removed.

    5. Adjust your angle accordingly, and reapply the marker as needed. Sometimes I've gone through 3 or 4 applications to make sure I'm taking material off where and when I want.

    6. You can do this with a belt too. Just be careful and go slow.

    Good luck!

    In my experience, I like to have two or so secondary bevels leading down to the cutting edge. It's easier to control the thickness behind the edge this way, as you just choose a corner to knock down and get r done.
     
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  13. Walll

    Walll

    87
    Nov 15, 2010
    I was feeling very frustrated with this knife but that has all changed now... I couldn't appreciate this info more - thank you!!!
     
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  14. Tony G

    Tony G Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 14, 2006
    I got my user FBM from a guy that was into sharpening knives and he took some material off the edge and that thing was insanely sharp. And now maybe 10 years later I have not had to re-profile the edge. I just do the sandpaper mouse thing and it pops right back. After 10 years of sandpaper and mouse pad it's probably a bit thicker at the edge. I admit that when I first got it I was worried that is was too thin but no problems and I do chop some old oak and a little *young* eucalyptus.
     
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  15. joeldworkin307

    joeldworkin307 Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 2, 2012
    @Walll Please keep us posted about how your sharpening goes. I just nabbed a Wardog off the exchange and I plan to put it through hell whenever I get the chance.
     
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  16. Walll

    Walll

    87
    Nov 15, 2010
    Right on! I saw that on the exchange... nice snag. I'm sure you'll love it - it just feels so good.

    I have some Shapton Glass stones (320 and 1000 grit) on order right now so I'll share my process in how I thin down the shoulder once they arrive. I'd love to know your sharpening process once your Wardog needs it too.
     
  17. tinfoil hat timmy

    tinfoil hat timmy Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2014
    Dont press too hard.
     
  18. Walll

    Walll

    87
    Nov 15, 2010
    Thanks for the reminder :)
     
  19. tinfoil hat timmy

    tinfoil hat timmy Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2014
    Hows things going? I bought a ton of sharpening stuff the other day. Oops!

    I hope your wardog cuts its teeth nicely.
    Let us know how it goes.
     
  20. Walll

    Walll

    87
    Nov 15, 2010
    My stones still haven't arrived yet unfortunately! Next week hopefully I can start the reprofiling :thumbsup:

    That's awesome though, what sharpening stuff did you buy?
     

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