RTAKII or Browning Crowell Barker Competition

Joined
Jun 11, 2008
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1,409
I had an RTAKII for several years and recently traded it to a friend. I am probably going to replace my RTAKII, but I am also interested in the Browning Crowell Barker Competition. I know the Browning comes with a convex edge but thats not a big deal because I would convex the RTAKII as I did my last one. I will primarily use it for chopping small hardwood trees, 3-4in in diameter. I know the Browning was designed for cutting competitions but when cutting manila rope, tatami mats, and similar things, your really not putting much stress on the edge. I loved the heavy, weight forward feeling of my RTAKII and I don't think I would get the same heavy chopping on hard wood from the Browning, mainly because the Browning looks to have a better balance for improving cutting precision. I'm not saying that I don't think the Browning will chop well, because I definitely do. I'm just wondering if it will chop side by side, or close, to the RTAKII after it has been properly convexed. My question pertains specifically to chopping hard/seasoned woods, as I have no doubt the Browning would out perform the RTAKII in most other tasks. Pics of the knives in use are welcomed as well.
Thanks in advance.
 
Joined
Jan 30, 2003
Messages
279
I had an RTAKII for several years and recently traded it to a friend. I am probably going to replace my RTAKII, but I am also interested in the Browning Crowell Barker Competition. I know the Browning comes with a convex edge but thats not a big deal because I would convex the RTAKII as I did my last one. I will primarily use it for chopping small hardwood trees, 3-4in in diameter. I know the Browning was designed for cutting competitions but when cutting manila rope, tatami mats, and similar things, your really not putting much stress on the edge. I loved the heavy, weight forward feeling of my RTAKII and I don't think I would get the same heavy chopping on hard wood from the Browning, mainly because the Browning looks to have a better balance for improving cutting precision. I'm not saying that I don't think the Browning will chop well, because I definitely do. I'm just wondering if it will chop side by side, or close, to the RTAKII after it has been properly convexed. My question pertains specifically to chopping hard/seasoned woods, as I have no doubt the Browning would out perform the RTAKII in most other tasks. Pics of the knives in use are welcomed as well.
Thanks in advance.
Just curious - since you already know you're going to be using this device to chop trees, why wouldn't you be looking at an ax or hatchet or saw? Seems kind of odd to me to be considering a knife when this is your primary purpose. Yes, a knife *can* be used for this task, but at the expense of much more work and time.
 
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wildmanh

Part time Leather Bender/Sheath maker
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Jul 9, 2000
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7,764
The Browning Competition knife has been used to cut 2x4's. Thats part of the competition.

As for which one to get, I have no clue. Don't have either but have heared good about both. Personally I'd get both, thats actually my plan some day but I'm broke now so it's going to be a while before I do it.

BTW Have you looked into Khukuris for chopping wood? Since you talk about chopping 3-4" diameter branches I figure I'd sujest something I do know a little about. My 20" Sirupati by Himalayan Imports weighs in at 23oz and can cut green branches in the 3 to 4" Diameter range with ease.

---

Some people ask why get a large knife when a Hatchet will do? Well, my Khukuri out chops my hatchets and the Khukuri will also slice water mellon and do other large knife duties that a Hatchet will not do. That would be my guess and why I carry a Bowie or Khukuri instead of a hatchet.

Heber
 
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Jan 30, 2003
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Some people ask why get a large knife when a Hatchet will do? Well, my Khukuri out chops my hatchets and the Khukuri will also slice water mellon and do other large knife duties that a Hatchet will not do. That would be my guess and why I carry a Bowie or Khukuri instead of a hatchet.
A kukri has much better qualities for chopping wood than the Browning, which is thin and intended for cutting rope, not wood. It doesn't have the necessary mass to be as useful in chopping wood as other designs.
 

wildmanh

Part time Leather Bender/Sheath maker
Joined
Jul 9, 2000
Messages
7,764
A kukri has much better qualities for chopping wood than the Browning, which is thin and intended for cutting rope, not wood. It doesn't have the necessary mass to be as useful in chopping wood as other designs.

Probably so, Since I have not used one I couldn't say. But I've seen someone cut up a 2x4 with a Browning Competition knife and they did it really quickly. It's been compared to the Kabar Heavy Bowie which I have. I can't chop with a bowie very well and I have at least 3 of them so still can't compare. But give me a Khukuri and I can. I learned on a Khukuri not a Bowie or Machete so I'm lousy with them. Some other people on the forum though are good with that type of knife..

Remember that mass and weight are not the only things to look at. Edge Geometry and speed also help along with Technique. If some one is good (like the guy in the video I saw) he will out chop someone else with the Browning. Sorry I can't find the Chopping with the Browning video. It was pretty cool.

Heber
 
Joined
Jun 11, 2008
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1,409
Just curious - since you already know you're going to be using this device to chop trees, why wouldn't you be looking at an ax or hatchet or saw? Seems kind of odd to me to be considering a knife when this is your primary purpose. Yes, a knife *can* be used for this task, but at the expense of much more work and time.

I have two wetterlings axes, a Granford Burks hatchet, a few H/I kukris, and a cold steel and kabar K.S.O. (kukri shaped object) I also got this a month ago and it has proven to chop with the best hatchets out there.
http://www.agrussell.com/knives/by_type/axes/a_g_russell_camp_ax_with_black_micarta.html
I am familiar with all the "right tools" for the job, and own a few of each. I want a large knife for weight and space. A large knife weighs significantly less than my H/I kukris, and takes up less room than any of my hatchets. I usually use my large knives for limbing but I want to know that I could use it to fell the tree if I needed it to. I don't often need to take down trees but I do limb saplings daily. I usually carry a ( pocket chainsaw ) http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___27001
and if I needed to take something really big that is what I use, it cuts fast!!!
Anyway, just looking for opinions on those two knives. I will be using it for limbing mostly but I want it to be able to chop well also.
 
Joined
Dec 25, 2007
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Just curious - since you already know you're going to be using this device to chop trees, why wouldn't you be looking at an ax or hatchet or saw? Seems kind of odd to me to be considering a knife when this is your primary purpose. Yes, a knife *can* be used for this task, but at the expense of much more work and time.
ja ik snap dat ook niet.

als je ziet wat die gasten op eurosport met een bijl doen .dat zie ik iemand met een groot mes ze niet nadoen.


in English:yes that's what I don't understand either.
if you look at Eurosport ,Timbersports,and see what those guys with axes are capable of.
I dont see anyone do that with a large knife.

en ook

I mean,the Texas chainsaw massacre?
that guy should be afraid of one of those guys performing in timbersports.
man they are explosive like hell
 
Joined
May 5, 2007
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108
I just received the February 2009 Blade magazine (not sure how it got here so early) and they test the Browning Crowell/Barker Comp knife. If you get the chance take a look at the article, the Browning's performance was impressive. I don't have the RTAKII so I can't compare them but for a heavy duty camp knife I'd consider the Browning.
 
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