Review RUIKE Knives P127-B

Discussion in 'Knife Reviews & Testing' started by craytab, Sep 12, 2020.

  1. craytab

    craytab Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 26, 2012
    Hello BladeForums!


    This is a review of the RUIKE Knives P127-B.


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    Full Disclosure: Ruike sent me this knife for review, along with the Hornet F-815 which I was really looking forward to and will be in a separate review.


    So, for all I know this is a hand picked knife that represents the best knife ever made in human history. I highly doubt that is what happened since this came directly from a big distributor that sells to many knife shops but you all should know how this knife came to me. I did not have my eye on this knife before Ruike asked me to review it. I have reviewed a knife for them before and I really wanted to have them send me the Hornet. They asked if I would also review this knife, and while a tanto blade blade shape is not my normal cup of tea, I said why not?


    Also, who makes this knife some might take issue with. I could not find concrete evidence of who the OEM of this knife is. The Ruike rep I am in contact couldn't even answer. Rumors are it is SRM. As many of you know SRM and its affiliates are linked to cloning and counterfeiting. I'm not going to get into all of that because there just aren't a lot of facts involved in that discussion. What I will say is that lots of quality companies use or have used SRM as their OEM, including big companies that most of us buy from and respect. This is no different.


    Ruike is the knife division of Fenix Flashlights. They know how to manufacture quality and bring the same to their knife brand. The fact that Ruike is essentially Fenix is important because they are a well established and respected brand that has an established network infrastructure that most importantly includes customer service and dealers. Other start up Chinese companies cannot claim these things.



    On to the review of the knife!


    Here is a link with all the technical specs. I won't bore you with breaking them all down. Here's a link with all the details: http://ruikeknives.com/store/product/p127-b/

    And a link to GP Knives:
    https://www.gpknives.com/ruike-p127-b-tanto-14c28n-black-g10-tactical-liner-lock-flipper.html


    How the knife came to me:
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    Overall impressions:

    I am not usually a fan of tanto blades. The Americanized tanto especially, I find not so useful for what I do with knives as I like having belly on a blade and I enjoy sharpening with a single sweeping motion. With that said, I find this tanto blade to be extremely aesthetically pleasing. Unlike the chunky and wide Americanized tanto we often see from companies like Cold steel and others, this tanto is more sleek and attractive to my eye. The second edge is elongated in a way that makes it look less chunky and more elegant. Both the main edge and the tanto tip have a little curve to them that make them look great.


    The handles are G-10 with well milled steel liners. You can get a version with Carbon fiber covered G-10 but in general I prefer G-10 over CF so this was the version I chose. The G-10 has a nicely milled zig-zag pattern and the texture is nice and gripy, not to the point that it will shred your pockets though. The knife nice and slim in pocket.

    The steel is 14c28n which is a fine steel especially in this market segment. In my use, I found the steel to perform as well as the same steel from other companies (Kershaw), meaning the heat treat seems to be well done. I will also add that this 14c28n performs better than the 8cr you find in many other budget Chinese blades. Also, I prefer 14c28n to Chinese D2, which is a steel that has seemingly flooded the market in recent years. Others may not agree with that preference but I think most will agree it is nice to see something that isn't Chinese D2 in this market segment.


    This knife runs on bearings which are well done and the action on my example is nice and snappy. The construction fit and finish seems spot on making for easy disassembly/maintenance and confidence that this will be a solid performer for years to come. Take a look at the internals below. BTW, the glass breaker is removable.

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    To be continued....
     
    Oloung1, Insipid Moniker and elde66 like this.
  2. craytab

    craytab Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 26, 2012
    Here are some pictures with comparisons and detailing certain aspects of the p127:


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    Oloung1 and elde66 like this.
  3. craytab

    craytab Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 26, 2012
    Use and testing:

    Now, normally when I am preparing to review a knife, I force myself to carry it exclusively for a month. I did do that with the P127, well, I carried a fixed blade often, but this was my folding knife exclusively for a bout a month. That said, I got this knife for review right when the pandemic hit here and everything shut down. So I wouldn't say this got my normal EDC since I really only left the house 1 day a week for that month of carry.

    So with that in mind, the knife did see lots of around the house and yard carry. It broke down a ton of card board, opened lots of packages, cut plenty of vegetation in the garden, and was used for things like cutting zip ties, cutting twine, crafting make shift squirrel deterrent cones out of plastic bottles, and other random tasks. I tested ninja, spec-op, low speed high drag capabilities by stabbing card board and the knife passed with flying colors, both with the Thumb Up lock engaged and without.

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    Issues and ending on a positive

    Price
    Considering the competition in this market segment is extremely fierce, I feel that at $50 this knife is over priced. I'd like to see it sub $40, $35 would be ideal. It does stand out given the blade steel and very attractive blade, but in my mind, not to the tune of about $15 more than some of the best the competition has to offer.

    Give us less of what we don't need
    The Thumbs Up secondary lock safety works. It is designed, made, and implemented very well. That said, I find it totally unnecessary. I've never been a fan of these secondary lock safety systems. I find them gimmicky at best and obtrusive at worst. The very idea has a cheap big box store knife kind of feeling, though Ruike as done this one very well. CRKT is the worst offender in this category, ruining a whole generation of knives with auto lawks, IMO. This knife doesn't sell in big box stores, but mostly online, we don't need gimmicks to help us make our decisions. Hopefully Ruike does sell some knives based on this mechanism, but I doubt it will be to knowledgeable knife enthusiasts, as most don't see this as a selling point. I will say that the Thumbs Up safety goes completely unnoticed unless you want to use it (IE, it is not in the way at all), which most of us won't, so why is it there?

    Next is the glass breaker. I understand this is billed as a tactical EDC knife but I'm not sure it fits that bill and needs a glass breaker, this isn't a BM 810 or 915 after all (pics above compare the P127 to the 810). It is nice that the glass breaker is removable. And to tie this point in to price, how much did it cost to design, implement, market, and sell these unnecessary features? If even a dime went into these things rather than keeping the cost of the knife down, I think that is a disservice to what is otherwise a very nice knife.

    The Flipper tab
    This needs work. It is either too small or not angled well, probably both. My finger constantly slips off unless I think about it before flipping. This problem goes away when carrying and using the knife exclusively but when I carry it after not having done so for a while, I forget and have the problem all over again. I can see what they are trying to do, aesthetically, with the design. It does look nice and the symmetrical form look is cool but the function needs more attention. I added some crude jimping with a file that helps, but it looks to me like a redesign is needed. The jimping Ruike put on the liner lock and the Thumbs Up safety is some of the best out there, nice and grippy, perhaps if they did something like that or some knurling on the flipper tab, the designed could be left as is, but I'm not sure. Some pics:

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    Positive improvement
    On the Ruike Hussar I criticized the sharp unchamfered edges on the G10 handles, which were left so for aesthetic reasons. I'm happy to report the G10 on the p127 handle is nicely chamfered! Take a look:

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    Another improvement was that Ruike did not use whatever thick gunky grease they used in the Hussar! That stuff was thick and hurt the Hussar's out of box performance. The P127 just had a normal light lubricant on the bearings. Nice!



    In Conclusion

    Ruike is continuing to show they are a player in the budget Chinese produced knife market. Standards for execution are high in the examples I have seen. They offer one of the very best budget steel choices in 14c28n where most of their competition is offering a flood of 8cr and Chinese D2.

    The P127-B exhibits the above characteristics of the company, which naturally sets it apart. The blade shape is also unique but not overly funky like a lot of other options out there. If you like a more traditional tanto, this blade should do it for you!

    We can still see Ruike is a new company and finding its way. I feel there are a couple glaring issues here with the P127-B but over all it is a very well executed knife with great fit/finish, execution, and very respectable materials. I can see Ruike improving and look forward to them continuing improvement, hopefully with aspects of this knife, in future generations.

    Please stay tuned for my review I am really excited about: the Ruike F815-B Hornet. Izula killer? And many of you know I am an Esee fan.....
     
    Oloung1 and elde66 like this.
  4. craytab

    craytab Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 26, 2012
    Some more glamour shots I've posted around the forum the last 5 months:

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  5. Silent H

    Silent H Gold Member Gold Member

    810
    Feb 1, 2018
    I like long narrow tanto blades like that. How does the tab on top of the blade affect the ergos? Seems like that would be the natural place for my thumb to rest when I hold it in a saber grip.

    Also that Spruce Goose mug is beautiful.
     
  6. craytab

    craytab Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 26, 2012
    I love the blade on this knife. Between the high level budget blade steel and the aesthetics, the blade is this knife's best feature IMO.

    I can certainly see how a saber grip could be impacted by the tab depending on where you like to put your thumb. I found that because of how forward you put your forefinger it feels fine with your thumb behind the tab. You could also put it above the tab for really bearing down in something like carving (not sure this is a carving type knife and I never used it as such), at least that is what I would do. For EDC tasks I mostly used this knife in a sort of pinch grip. Here are the pics from the review showing a sber grip compared to a PM2.

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    As for the Spruce Goose, My old man has been a volunteer at the Evergreen Aviation Museum for 15 years or so. Very cool place to visit if you are an aviation enthusiast. I've sat in the cockpit and toured Goose a few times. Super neat.
     
  7. Mikel_24

    Mikel_24

    Sep 19, 2007
    Great review. I don't quite like the tanto blade shapes so I guess this will be a pass. But if they reflect this level of fit and finish in other knives of their current production line, I would probably buy one in the future.

    Thanks!
     
  8. craytab

    craytab Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 26, 2012
    You're Welcome! And yes, in the 3 examples I have they all exhibit this level of execution. I highly recommend the f-815 Hornet. The belt attachment needs a little work but otherwise it is excellent!

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    Oloung1 likes this.
  9. FCCBCT

    FCCBCT

    223
    Jul 23, 2014
    Ruike are made in China by the same company who makes FENIX lights. I've seen many of their knives and the QC as far as I'm concerned varies greatly, some mechanisms are absolutely great, some do not work well at all. The ones made from Ti and good blade steels are of course not cheap, why should they be? On the other hand FENIX, in my personal experience (I have bought all of my torches/flashlights, so not gifted with them, I can say what I want to without company pressures) I think are great and have taken a beating from caving to camping all around the globe. However, my observations are based upon some 12 or so models in my hands, maybe others have completely different views about the quality of their products.
     
  10. banana-clip

    banana-clip

    Jun 7, 2007
    Great review, looks like a great knife. I might have to check them out.
     
    craytab likes this.

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