Satin finish

Joined
Aug 16, 2020
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7
Hi,
Im really struggeling to get a smooth 800g satin finish. It looks good in some angles but in others I get shiny spots and spots that look more...dark? What am I doing wrong?

My process is: come of the grinder at 280g, handsand 400, 600, 800g in 45 angles making sure all the old scratches are gone before moving on. Last grit I do with a stick with soft backing.


Thanks for any help!
 

AVigil

Adam Vigil knifemaker working the grind
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Feb 17, 2009
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You really need to post some pictures to get a proper assessment
 

Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith

ilmarinen - MODERATOR
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There are many methods of getting a satin finish. After belt sanding to 400, I use 3-M Scotch-Brite, or Red Lable, surface conditioning belts. The medium (maroon) or fine (green) belt work best for me.
 

Hengelo_77

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Mar 2, 2006
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Start hand sanding at 220/240.
Take your time hand sanding.
What I do is use soap water as a lubricant, also on the last grit size.
Then take a fresh piece of paper, a bit of oil and move 50 times ricasso to tip with the same piece of paper.
Lift at the tip, replace at the ricasso, 50 times.
The paper wears out and gives a softer look.
Only do this when you get a good finish before.
Don't rush, enjoy it or pretent to enjoy it.
Hand sanding is Zen.
 

Signalprick

Jason Ritchie - Ritchie Handmade Knives
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Come off the grinder at 400 grit or above. Work smarter not harder. Start at 150 and work your way up through the grits to final grit. At final grit do your drags but never use the same piece of paper twice. As you can see you'll get 100 different technique recommendations. Find what works best for you and roll with it.
 

Taz

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Satin finish is usually the scratches going the same direction as the belt sander marks; ie from spine to edge (perpendicular to the edge). Hand rub is usually with the scratches going from plunge to tip on the knife (parallel to the edge)? I think there is some confusion, I think you mean the hand rub finish?
 

FredyCro

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Jan 11, 2019
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Satin finish is usually the scratches going the same direction as the belt sander marks; ie from spine to edge (perpendicular to the edge). Hand rub is usually with the scratches going from plunge to tip on the knife (parallel to the edge)? I think there is some confusion, I think you mean the hand rub finish?
Satin refers to a uniform non-mirrored finish. It can be achieved by hand sanding or machine sanding. By machine its harder to do a lengthwise finish, but is doable on kitchen knifes (without plunges). I imagine even knives with plunges would be doable on a 2x72 with a waterfall platen, but never tried that or see anybody do it in YT.
 

Signalprick

Jason Ritchie - Ritchie Handmade Knives
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Satin finish is usually the scratches going the same direction as the belt sander marks; ie from spine to edge (perpendicular to the edge). Hand rub is usually with the scratches going from plunge to tip on the knife (parallel to the edge)? I think there is some confusion, I think you mean the hand rub finish?
I've always referred to it as "As ground" or handrubbed satin. YMMV
 

FredyCro

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I even realized that machine finishes are quite sought for if done right and that a lot of makers that sell well don't do any handsanding at all. They are just harder to learn, because there is no way to hide or blend mistakes (as you do with handsanding). That's my opinion at least. That's why I try machine finish first and when I fail I resort to handsading and blending.
 

Hengelo_77

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Many different makers, many different opinions.
To me a machine finish just doesn't look finished and a well done hand finish says: hand made, I put in the extra mile.

I agree with Fredy that a good machine finish is far from easy
 

FredyCro

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Many different makers, many different opinions.
To me a machine finish just doesn't look finished and a well done hand finish says: hand made, I put in the extra mile.

I agree with Fredy that a good machine finish is far from easy
From what I have seen, B Loveless didn't do any handsanding 😂

Some would argue that everything that is not mirrored finish is unfinished 😁

I just thougth of my brother after I proudly presented him one of my blades finished on a very fine scotchbrite belt, his comment was: "You sure have a lot of scratches there“ in reference to the satin finish 😁
 
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