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Sealing End Grain on Natural Mesquite

Discussion in 'Hammer & Tongs' started by redsquid2, Apr 2, 2017.

  1. redsquid2

    redsquid2 KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 31, 2011
    I have never worked with natural mesquite. I just went with what I had on hand, which was Tru Oil. I guess I will just keep applying it until the wood won't soak up any more.

    I also heard you can use Danish Oil, but I don't have any on hand.

    [​IMG]

    Since taking this picture, I have put another coat on, sanding it with 800 grit to make slurry. It still is quite porous.
     
  2. redsquid2

    redsquid2 KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 31, 2011
    Also, I love cutting and sanding this stuff, because the aroma is awesome.
     
  3. redsquid2

    redsquid2 KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 31, 2011
    After third application of Tru-Oil:


    [​IMG]
     
  4. redsquid2

    redsquid2 KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 31, 2011
    Pictures after the fourth application of Tru Oil. Before this application, I rubbed my surface with a white scotchbrite. I then laid on the Tru Oil as thick and shiny as possible, waited about two minutes, then wiped off the excess with a soft cotton cloth. About 40 minutes later, I took these pictures:

    [​IMG]




    [​IMG]




    I don't think the end grain of mesquite can be perfectly sealed and smoothed, unless it is stabilized mesquite.
     
  5. mete

    mete Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 10, 2003
    I don't know about oils but I've done rifle stocks with urethane .Build up layer after layer until all the pores are filled then sand down to wood. Apply about three thin coats and you're done . That's using urethane as a filler .There are commercial fillers that will work also .Either way a smooth , filled pore wood. With urethane you can also use sawdust with urethane to match color and get a faster job.
    Yes all the pores will be filled. If you use oil there is a problem of cure as oil should be applied with thin layers. So that will take longer .
     
  6. DanF

    DanF KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    534
    Apr 17, 2017
    I use Tru oil for finishing mandolins. Tru oil takes many, many coats but is worth the effort. Another thing that will help lessen the number of coats is to use shellac (the real stuff than you mix from flakes) to penetrate and seal the wood, let dry and then use Tru oil over it.
     
  7. golfer1

    golfer1

    366
    Nov 24, 2016
    What DanF said, shellac dries quickly and you can use more than one coat. You will still need multiple coats of Tru Oil but it is good stuff. Urethane can add a yellow/orange color to the wood that may not be good.
     
    redsquid2 likes this.

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