Searing Steak in Propane Forge?

Discussion in 'Around the Grinder' started by The Mighty Ginsu, Jul 21, 2019.

  1. The Mighty Ginsu

    The Mighty Ginsu

    206
    Aug 11, 2016
    I have a feeling this thread will be deleted, but nonetheless: I am wondering if anyone has tried searing a steak in a propane forge. Propane grills are very weak, so unless I want to fry on cast iron, I have to use a torch to finish beef correctly. It occurred to me that a few seconds in a forge might be the answer.
     
  2. 3fifty7

    3fifty7 Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 24, 2016
    It’ll probably get moved to cooking but anyway.

    I’ve considered this myself.
    I’ve eaten one before out of a glass blowers forge.

    My forge gas a blown burner and my plan is to get it up to temp and shut it down then slide a couple steaks in on a .25” x 5” x 12” piece of preheated stainless.
     
  3. The Mighty Ginsu

    The Mighty Ginsu

    206
    Aug 11, 2016
    Didn't know there was a cooking subforum. Sorry about that.
     
  4. 3fifty7

    3fifty7 Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 24, 2016
    Yea it’s kind of difficult to find.
    I think it goes:

    Community Discussion >
    Activities / Skills >
    Food / Drink / Cooking
     
  5. coldsteelburns

    coldsteelburns

    Aug 2, 2010
    I've roasted hotdogs with my forge a couple times since I don't have a BBQ or fire pit anymore, and it worked great for that, but never tried a steak. I've never really been much of a fan of steak though lol.


    ~Paul
    My Youtube Channel
    ... (Just some older videos of some knives I've made in the past)
     
  6. Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith

    Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith ilmarinen - MODERATOR Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 20, 2004
    I don't know how you cook your steaks, but if you can't grill one right without a torch, you need to take a look at your equipment.

    A propane forge has too many fumes and contaminates to cook a steak in. Some folks have roasted a bratwurst or two in the dragons breath.

    Here are the three ways I teach cooking a good steak, like a 1.5 to 2" fillet mignon:
    1) Heat the grill to high heat and let sit for 10 minutes. Open the grill, set the steaks on the grill, close the hood. Reduce to medium heat. In exactly 3 minutes, open the grill and flip the steaks - close the grill. In 2 mimutes, open the grill and remove a perfectly done medium rare steak.

    2) Heat a heavy pan or skillet on medium high heat.. Put a little olive oil in then pan and when the oil shimmers, drop in the steaks. Reduce to just above medium and cook for 3 to 5 minutes. Flip steaks and cook for 1 minute. Move steaks to side of pan and drop in 1Tbs of unsalted butter. Let it melt, bubble, and brown ... turning pan to spread it out. This takes about 1 minute. Move steaks onto the butter, slide around, flip over for 30 seconds, remove to warm plates.

    3) Sous-vide the steaks at 131F for 2 to 3 hours. Heat pan or grill as above and place in high heat for about 1 minute per side. Serve immediately. This makes the most perfect side to side medium rare and juicy steak you will ever eat.
    An alternative way to finish a sous-vide steak is to use a steak searing head propane torch ( a catalytic head that creates intense infra-red heat). These are a bit pricy, but will sear a sous-vide steak in 30 to 60 seconds.
     
  7. RedFury

    RedFury Gold Member Gold Member

    315
    Jun 17, 2015
    That Stacy! Most have a degree in Everythingology. But he has never steered me wrong LOL.
     
  8. RedFury

    RedFury Gold Member Gold Member

    315
    Jun 17, 2015
    My steak gets the cast iron treatment.
     
    The Mighty Ginsu and Josh Rider like this.
  9. Horsewright

    Horsewright KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Oct 4, 2011
    Step 1) Make bull calf steer calf.

    [​IMG]

    Step 2) Keep em on good grass till 2years old and weighing 1100 lbs. Butcher in late spring.

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    Some years ya need lots and lots of grass.

    [​IMG]

    Step 3) Meanwhile make steak knives:

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    And assorted kitchen knives:

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    Step 4) Pull out a couple ribeye's of your own grassfed beef:

    [​IMG]

    And ya gotta use this stuff:

    [​IMG]

    Step 5) Get the wife to make her ceviche:

    [​IMG]

    Invite the neighbors over, make sure they bring a couple of New Yorks also your grassfed beef:

    [​IMG]

    Step 6) Toss em on the grill with some custom sausage your ranching partner brought over:

    [​IMG]

    Ya also got to have bacon wrapped jalapeno poppers going and the corn:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Also necessary throughout the cooking procedure to practice proper rodent control, those little suckers can get out of line:

    [​IMG]

    Step 7 Plating:

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    Make sure your edc doesn't get thirsty:

    [​IMG]

    And enjoy the fireworks:

    [​IMG]
     
  10. The Mighty Ginsu

    The Mighty Ginsu

    206
    Aug 11, 2016
    Okay, I can see I started a controversy, and now I have to point out that I can cook. I should have known this would start up. I can REALLY cook. I have very little interest in cooking now, so it's sort of ironic, but I have plenty of ability.

    When I make an effort, my steaks are far better than those from Ruth's Chris, Morton's, the Capital Grille, Peter Luger, Smith & Wollensky or any other high-end restaurant I've visited, so it's not like I can't prepare a steak. A pinhead can prepare a good steak; it's easier than boiling eggs. It's so simple, it's nothing to be proud of. You just apply heat to beef. If I go to a high-end steakhouse, it's because I'm dining with other people. The food, including sides, is invariably far inferior to what I can prepare at home.

    1. My current equipment IS a problem. Propane grills sold commercially are weak, and that includes the $2200 "professional" (a mythological term) built-in I used to have. A steak that isn't somewhat charred and hot on the outside is cooked improperly, and I had to modify my current grill ($115 from Amazon) in order to get a decent result. I bought a big regulator from a turkey fryer and turned the gas way up, and I had to adjust the air shutters to cope with the gas flow. It's still not as hot as it should be, but it's hard to complain about a total investment of $150 or less. When the grill craps out, I can either buy parts and repair it cheap, or I can put it in the trash and get a new one.

    Before someone mentions wood and charcoal, I know I could do better with either, but I'm not going to work that hard or turn my farm into an ash-dumping ground. My days of cooking as a laborious hobby are done. I am not a foodie. They are annoying and pretentious. They ruin meals with their attitude. I just want to get it over with and get the food on the table. I quit aging my own beef, and I rarely buy prime now. I just want to be able to prepare an A- meal in less than twenty minutes without a hideous mess. It's propane or nothing, unless my next house miraculously comes with an electric salamander. It's absolutely fine with me if someone else somewhere is cooking slightly better steaks.

    I'm never buying an expensive gas grill again. No matter what you spend, they don't last, it's hard or impossible to get people to work on them, and the performance is generally bad except for things that don't require searing. I just got a $115 portable that, as modified, works somewhat better than the $2200 grill I used to have. People tell me Australian grills are better. I don't care. I'm all done spending big money on grills. That's for foodies and hipsters.

    As for torches and other external means of compensating for weak grills, they work very well, and knowledgeable cooking experts recommend them. I have a Searzall arriving today, and I'm looking forward to seeing how well it works. Even without a Searzall, my torch works great, and it's very quick and convenient. Even with flames leaping up through the rack, my grill is not hot enough to produce properly charred burgers with pink insides without help.

    2. Right now, I am not set up for it, but my default cooking method used to be a cast iron griddle on a turkey fryer base. My results differ from yours. If I cooked a steak for the short time you recommend, it would be very rare. I use a meat thermometer to judge the cooking time, and a 1.5" rib eye takes a good 15 minutes to reach medium-rare. I quit when the temperature is 120. At that point it has a wonderful dark crust without black areas.

    Filets are not my thing. Women love them, because they judge steaks purely by how easy they are to cut. They're my second choice because they're relatively lean and flavorless.

    I quit cooking steaks in the house because traditional kitchens are designed for women who reheat frozen food and occasionally scramble an egg, and they aren't made to handle greasy smoke or spatters. My kitchen is full of fancy painted surfaces where grease will accumulate, and the vent hood, while large by most people's standards, is completely inadequate. The ceiling is 10.5 feet high, and I don't plan to get on a ladder and clean or paint it. From now on, it's the grill or the griddle.

    I just bought a $20 butane stove, and I'm planning to get a griddle to fit it. It will work as well as the old turkey fryer, and it's very small and easy to clean and store.

    I just asked the forge question out of curiosity. I don't have a forge, and I can prepare steaks as well as I want to.
     
  11. mooniesdl3

    mooniesdl3

    95
    May 12, 2016
    I use method #3, and my gas grill has a searing side burner with LOTS of BTU's. I do have a Searz-all searing head for my torch as well, it works very well but the ceramic searing burner works better.
     
  12. The Mighty Ginsu

    The Mighty Ginsu

    206
    Aug 11, 2016
    I had an embarrassing experience with the grill today. It wouldn't be embarrassing if I didn't tell anyone, but here I go. I went to the grocery, and they had a bunch of rib eyes on sale for $6 per pound. I'm not stupid; I know these things aren't even choice, but I've eaten them before, and they're surprisingly good, so I grabbed one that had a great deal of marbling. It was good enough for a Monday.

    Got it home, grilled it, and found out it was a T-bone. I have never seen a T-bone that looked like a rib eye before. It was in a pile of rib eyes, and it looked like a rib eye as long as I didn't stare at it carefully. The NY strip side was shaped like the eye part of a rib eye. Craziest thing.

    The grill did a much better job than usual. I planned on using the torch, but the steak oozed so much fat it was continuously bathed in flames, and that produced a very nice char. If only it would do that with burgers.

    The steak wasn't bad at all for a T-bone. At Ruth's Chris, I would have been tempted to send it back, but for $9 on a Monday afternoon in my own home, it was perfectly acceptable.
     
  13. Tin.Man

    Tin.Man

    849
    Sep 5, 2010
    1.5 min a side on medium high heat in a carbon steel pan use avocado oil to sear higher smoke point? Kosher salt, garlic powder and black pepper then into a 375 preheated oven for 7-10 mins. Irish butter on top of the steaks when they come out of the oven
     
  14. Brian Stucker

    Brian Stucker Gold Member Gold Member

    146
    Apr 20, 2016
    I like mine med. I salt and pepper then I put butter and garlic powder in a cast iron skillet. Get it really hot cook 1 min. 30 seconds on each side. Let rest for 5 min. In the mean time I have my gas grill to 500 degrees. Then I cook them 1-2 min per side. Then put a couple pat's of butter on the steak. Then let rest for another 5 min.
     
  15. Atlas Knife Company

    Atlas Knife Company KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Feb 16, 2010
    Who throws corn straight on the grill? Don't peel them, just throw them on the grill still in the leaves when you cook them, they will be much jucier.
     
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  16. Horsewright

    Horsewright KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Oct 4, 2011
    Use to grill em prior to shucking and found no difference really except ya don't get the roasting and charring. Often grill for groups of 15-20 folks (we have the party house). Its the same group of friends so they have had the corn done the other way too and the feedback has been a preference for the corn done this way, just tossing em shucked on the grill. I also use to shuck the corn, season and drizzle with butter and olive oil and wrap in tinfoil and grill em that way. That comes out great too but its a lot of work for a big group, takes a lot of time. Often when we have these deals we don't have a lot of time. They're not planned parties, just hey what ya doing? Straight on the grill works good.
     
  17. Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith

    Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith ilmarinen - MODERATOR Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 20, 2004
    I shuck the corn, set it on a sheet of foil, squirt on some EVOO, sprinkle with Montreal Seasoning,and then seal up the foil tight to the corn. Grill and when you unwrap you have moist and juicy grilled corn. For something different, use about 20% sesame oil 80% olive oil. Another thing that is great is to dist the corn with togarashi.
     
  18. A.McPherson

    A.McPherson KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jan 27, 2012
    Yup! I like to soak mine in water first, I’m not sure if it actually helps or not, but that’s how I do it!
    Then butter and Tony’s Cajun seasoning on top!
     
    cootersplace likes this.
  19. tmerkl

    tmerkl

    143
    Jan 8, 2007
  20. Horsewright

    Horsewright KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Oct 4, 2011
    I really like it. A bargain too. Drinks like a much more expensive whiskey. Although ya wouldn't know it from that pic, I'm not even Irish.
     

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