1. BladeForums has ZERO TOLERANCE for extremism or calls of violence. We request your assistance dealing with this as we do not want to see the site shut down due to violent threats. Please see this thread here in Tech Support: https://www.bladeforums.com/threads/bladeforums-has-a-zero-tolerance-policy-towards-threats-of-violence-extremism-be-warned.1769537/

Sgt. Khadka Chainpuri and Bura Dukti preliminary - WOW!

Discussion in 'Himalayan Imports' started by Ryan M, Jan 22, 2010.

  1. Ryan M

    Ryan M

    360
    Aug 18, 2001
    Both blades arrived today. Hooray for using USPS again!

    First off, the Chainpuri. This blade is absolutely amazing. 18.5" long and right at 15 ounces on my postage scale. Despite the light weight and the fully 3/16" thick brass plate Sgt. Khadka used for a pommel, it has a very aggressive balance 3.5" ahead of the bolster. Some people refer to a forward balance as "aggressive," but this one has an actually, willfully, aggressive balance. Everyone who's held this knife has had one thing to say; "WOW!" It literally feels like it wants to cut something.

    And despite the incredibly light weight, the thickness at the spine lets you know it's a real khukuri. 0.333" at the bolster, slight taper down to .303" at the bend, then a very slow curving taper, almost like a looooong appleseed, to the tip. It's very close to 1/4" thick halfway between the tip and the "corner" of the spine. The edge profile is amazingly thin, about 0.167" thick at the sweet spot, just before the slight fuller. Slightly convex, basically a perfect appleseed shape plus the fuller.

    This is also my first HI blade which would easily push-cut paper right out of the scabbard. The tip is amazingly acute and dirklike, compared to the slightly rounded tips on many of the woodcutting-oriented Khuks. It's obvious that the Sergeant made this blade for one purpose, and one purpose only; making a person or animal (even a yeti!) stop what they're doing immediately.

    I forget who scored the second Sgt. Khadka Chainpuri, but you're in for a real treat! I can guarantee that yours will make you want to raise it over your head and scream "AYO GHORKALI!!!!!"

    I wish I had one of the original Kumar Kobras that was forged out of a file, to compare to. That would be a very interesting comparison, considering how highly Kumar was spoken of when he still worked at HI.

    Edit: I just chopped the triangle-tube it came in. Just a flick-of-the-wrist sort of chop. It went 3/4 of the way through! Wow! The same force of blow with my 15" Siru only cuts about 1" in...

    Second, my special ordered Dukti sword, which looks to have been made by Bura. Initials La Ba, crescent moon mark, I don't know who else it could be. :cool:

    Interestingly, the balance is much farther forward than I would have thought, an entire 6" ahead of the guard, compared to my short Tibetan (with a more Uddha-like blade) that balances 4.5" ahead, and my Giant Chitlangi which balances 3.5" ahead. Despite that, the fact that it weighs only 28.5 ounces means that it's not slow or unweildy by any standards. The central fuller also makes it make a rather loud noise, nearly a whistle, when swung properly.

    One unusual thing I notice is that this blade actually has a reverse distal taper! It starts out at 0.204" thick at the ricasso, then very uniformly thickens to 0.255" just before the fuller ends. I've never seen a sword do that. I think that actually makes some sense for a primarily stabbing blade, though; having the thickest part first means there may be less resistance when pulling the blade out after a thrust. It definitely works that way with cardboard boxes, anyway. It stabs in very easily, and glides back out, while the short Tibetan, despite having a more acute tip, drags a lot both ways.

    And the carving of the dragon is perfect, as can be expected.

    The only imperfection on the blade at all is that one of the edges was ground a little wonky right above where the fuller ends, on one side. The good news is, it wasn't ground enough, so it should be very easy to correct with a file (it's easy to take metal away, not so easy to put it back). It also doesn't affect function of the blade in any way at all, purely cosmetic, and an easy fix.

    Pics on both are forthcoming!

    Well, poop. This was the best pic I could get, with sun having set, and the lighting in here.

    [​IMG]

    And the tip of the Dukti, which is just the tiniest bit off, you can see how the "line" goes off to the left.

    [​IMG]

    Might not be as easy a fix as I'd thought, as I remembered "oh yeah, this is a Bura heat treat" while I was trying to knock the burrs off with sandpaper. The steel on this sword is hard.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2010
  2. stickfred

    stickfred

    803
    Nov 6, 2009
    Congratulations on your new steel Ryan. Don't you just love it when you get a new triangular box delivered? The handle carving on the Dukti looks great from what I can see. Maybe you can get some more pictures when the sun returns. How long is that Dukti in overall and blade length? It looks like a very nice sword. Being Bura made I'm sure its a quality piece of work and art.

    At this point in time I don't have a khukuri that compares to the Sgt. Khadka Chainpuri-I can only imagine how it feels at 15oz. I'm glad to see he's still doing excellent work and that you got hold of a piece of it. Interesting, too, that he went away from the bell shaped handle and put the butt plate on. Looks good.

    Thanks for your impressions and photo.

    Rick
     
  3. Ryan M

    Ryan M

    360
    Aug 18, 2001
    That at least, I can do tonight, by putting a diffuser on my flashlight. It's anything but close-ups that's a problem. :(

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    27.5" overall, of which 20.25" is blade, and 28.5 ounces. Definitely a nice one.

    I think very very few people have one that compares to this. From what I'm reading, the first Kumar Kobra was about 17.5" and weighed 14 ounces. Another was 19.5" and 17 ounces. So similar to those in weight per inch, though I do wish I had one to compare "feel," as the thick brass plate has to change things some. Never heard anyone speak poorly of a Kobra.

    I wonder if this and the other "magic" Chainpuri were made out of old files? Could be care package steel!

    Yeah, I noticed that too. I'm tempted to call this a "Super Chainpuri," as a properly weighted pommel (and this is definitely properly weighted) can actually increase the power of your cuts.

    Glad you like them, too. :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2010
  4. stickfred

    stickfred

    803
    Nov 6, 2009
    Thanks for the close ups of the Dukti handle. That carving looks very nicely done.

    I read Rusty talking about a Villager that he picked up out of the first batch that was less than an ounce per inch. Actually he was raving about it, how light and lively it felt in hand. I hope they can keep more coming in that weight range 'cause I'd like to see how it feels.

    Thanks you again for your pictures. All that's left is the chopping.
     
  5. InfidelShootist

    InfidelShootist

    Nov 10, 2007
    Nice review and pictures.Love that Chainpuri.I got the other one.
     
  6. Bladite

    Bladite ǝɹnsıǝן ɟo uɐɯǝןʇuǝb Moderator

    Feb 28, 2003
    very interesting chainpuri...

    sometimes, i really wonder what the good Sgt could do if he were to branch out to other blades: Nessmuk, bolos, gununtings, goloks, ...


    Bladite
     
  7. b.c.molin

    b.c.molin

    Nov 28, 2008
    Great info and picture's Ryan.

    Thanks for sharing, and hope you get the chance for some more photo's of the sword.
     
  8. Ryan M

    Ryan M

    360
    Aug 18, 2001
    The dayorb hasn't been very cooperative, so here's another terrible indoor photo of my 3 HI swords.

    [​IMG]

    The tip on the Dukti turned out to be very very easy to fix with a diamond file. Given how hard it was to knock the burrs off the edge, I think Bura figured out how to differentially harden a double edged sword, somehow!
     
  9. b.c.molin

    b.c.molin

    Nov 28, 2008
    Good news that the Dutki was 'squared off' successfully. I have read that both the Dutki and Manjushree Swords are differentially hardened. I would really like to know that is true or if they are quenched-hardened?

    With regards the Giant Chitlangi Bowie, I yo-yo between categorising mine as either a knife or sword. Considering its size and weight, it can fit both. ;)

    Oh, I really like your Short Tibetan Sword. It is one of the few items I hope to purchase this year.
     
  10. Ryan M

    Ryan M

    360
    Aug 18, 2001
    Me too. It really does seem as though the edges are harder than the spine.

    I like to think of it as sort of a "Dwarven" bastard sword. Exact same weight and balance as a regular bastard sword (3 lbs 11 oz., balances 3.5" ahead of the guard), but much shorter, and it hits more like an axe. Definitely my absolute favorite blade of all time. Though this new Chainpuri, the polar opposite, is really growing on me. If I were just a little taller, I'd be seriously thinking about having a concealed carry rig made to hide it under a jacket.

    Definitely go for it. Mine is surprisingly nimble IMO, much closer in handling to a cut-and-thrust sword, than a heavier slashing blade.
     
  11. Steely_Gunz

    Steely_Gunz Got the Khukuri fevah Moderator

    May 9, 2002
    Thanks for the review on that Chain:) I was wondering how it felt in hand....might have to break out my sharkin' shoes and pick up one the next time they go up...lookout fellas:D:cool:

    Those double edge HI swords are something else, aren't they? I have a Manjushree that I absolutely love. Really the only difference between the Manjushree and the Dukti (that I can see) is that the Manjushree usually comes with a steel crossguard rather than the circular brass one.

    At the end of the day, they both make fine Himalayan Gladius (Gladiuses? Gladius'? Gladii?....swords:eek::p)
     
  12. sta94

    sta94

    275
    Jul 7, 2008
    Ryan M, good to read your positive review of that Chainpuri. I’ve handled several similar khukuris and the better ones feel the same as you describe them – light, fast, agile and alive to the point of being aggressive, love them! Of course, these are usually not as well-made as your Sgt. Khadka one looks like, but they are very similar. Glad to see HI bring these improved versions of a villager style that is pretty popular in the Himalayas today.

    Some photos, only one of these is still with me:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Also, you may have already come across this thread, if not, you may find it of interest – more photos in here:

    http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=658399&highlight=eastern+himalayas
     
  13. sta94

    sta94

    275
    Jul 7, 2008
    I do have an old Kumar Kobra, atleast I'm pretty sure it's a Kumar Kobra even though it doesn't look quite like a regular Kobra, more like a Malla. Anyways, I picked it up around 10 years ago, might have been from the first batch of Kobras made (could be wrong here). It does have hatch-marks all over the blade flats and even the karda and chakmak have what look like remnants of hatch-marks - don't know if this means it was an old file. I'll take better photos and post them soon, in the meantime here are some [email protected] pics I took some years ago:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Length is around 17" OAL, don't know exact weight but it's very light and agile, although it does not feel as "aggressive" as the better villagers I've handled. This is a very neat khukuri though.

    Re: your Sgt. Khadka Chainpuri, IMVHO, I somewhat doubt it's made from old files, as this seems to be a pretty popular style in Nepal and parts of the Himalayas, pretty widely available for local consumption these days. Looks like you got yourself a great khukuri!
     
  14. Karda

    Karda Banned BANNED

    Jun 1, 2007
    IIRC, i read somewhere that Kumar did make some kobra's out of old worn out large files.
    That would make this quite a rare one.
     
  15. Big W

    Big W

    176
    Feb 19, 2008
    sta94, that ole Kumar Kobra is something else!! :thumbup: would love to handle it and compare it to the villager for speed and agility.
     
  16. Ryan M

    Ryan M

    360
    Aug 18, 2001
    Thanks for the great pics and info, Sta94! The Sgt. Khadka chainpuri is definitely similar to those, but even narrower (1.45" broad at the shoulder, 1.33" at the center of the belly), and the massive chitlangi style pommel. And sadly, with a slightly lower quality scabbard than those. It looks like the Sergeant only did the blade and handle, possibly the main part of the scabbard, then had an apprentice or one of his kids do the decorative work on the scabbard, and definitely the kardas.

    How's the distal taper on those? I've looke at the spine of mine a little more closely (with my glasses on), and it looks like there's a very rapid transition just past the shoulder. It tapers down from .303" to .239" over the course of about 2", then stays that thickness until about 3" from the tip. I think the very thin belly may be what's responsible for both the handling and the cutting power this blade has.

    Looks like the style is intended to be tucked into a belt or sash, and has a slightly less pronounced curve than the woodworking-oriented khukuris, for a fast draw. I can imagine those being very popular, with the recent Maoist uprising and other troubles.
     
  17. sta94

    sta94

    275
    Jul 7, 2008
    The scabbards on the four villagers pictured are all pretty rough affairs too. For one of them (top-most in pics and the one still with me), I had to dismantle it and smoothen out the insides by filing/scraping the rough portions that were catching on the blade. And yes, kardas and chakmaks on these are really nothing to write home about! This rough appearance with minimal aesthetics seem to be pretty common amongst these villager models - and for a reason too, the clientele for which these khukuris are intended for would probably not be able to afford prettier (and thus more expensive) khukuris. You will find very well-done scabbards, etc. but these are aimed at consumers with a higher price point! Atleast your villager has a really nice, solid handle and butt-plate. Two of the four villagers in my pic have partial-tang handles.

    None of these are with me at present - the one I still own is back in Asia right now. One of these did end up with a fellow forumite, so perhaps he may be able to give some measurements (and maybe more) whenever he gets around to it. ;)

    Yes, these are intended to be tucked into sashes. However, I've seen folks fashion rough frogs for these and hang them from their belts too.
     
  18. Big W

    Big W

    176
    Feb 19, 2008
    Sta94, it would be my pleasure. :D The OAL length is 18" and weight is somewhere I around 25oz. This one is partial tang and as you know, handling and feel are wonderful. A great kukri IMHO. :thumbup:

    [​IMG]
     
  19. sta94

    sta94

    275
    Jul 7, 2008
    Big W, thanks very much for the photo! Now, that's a nice solid hunk of a villager khukuri! Pick it up and you can almost feel a heightened sense of its edge and point, very alive, like a lithe beast coiled to pounce on its prey, seriously!!! :thumbup:
     
  20. Yangdu

    Yangdu [email protected] Himalayan Imports-Owner Moderator

    Apr 5, 2005
    Great pix, thank you for sharing
     

Share This Page