1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Shadetree Composites Oatmeal Burlap Pocket Sheath

Discussion in 'Fiddleback Forge Knives' started by nomotorjrr, Oct 8, 2017.

  1. nomotorjrr

    nomotorjrr Gold Member Gold Member

    35
    Apr 11, 2011
    ****Please remember to use safety equipment and a RESPIRATOR with proper filter cartridges. Particulate from this type of material is hazardous.****


    As requested, I am posting a few photos of the progress of a sheath I put together for my Fiddleback Forge Pygmy using Shadetree Composites Oatmeal Burlap and black phenolic pins. I made the sheath using a bench drill press, Dremel rotary tool, files and sandpaper. I only took a few photos during the process but I'm happy to share what I have. If a photo is worth a thousand words, due to the lack of photos, here are a thousand words. This is my first sheath and first time working with this material.

    Here, I have already measured for the knife on both sides of the Shadetree scales and removed most of the material. I also marked the ends where the blade would enter the sheath. I bored out the material using the Dremel and files, removing just enough material on each half of the sheath so the blade would fit as snugly as possible. I used a dremel cut-out guide and bit as a router and removed the bulk of the material. I finished using carving bits, grinding stones and files that I had on hand. I filed bevels into the receiving end of the sheath to accomodate the bevels of the knife scales. It doesn't match perfectly, but it's pretty close and I didn't want to push my luck! I also glued a small, thin strip of leather on the inside of the sheath using Goop contact adhesive to secure the knife when sheathed.
    [​IMG]
    At this point, I decided to epoxy(5 minute) the halves together and drill for the phenolic pins later. I marked the halves in several places along the edges to assist in alignment during epoxying and clamping. I roughed the mating sides to help bond and utilized wax paper to prevent the epoxy from sticking to anything else during curing.
    [​IMG]
    I marked pin placement using a micrometer. I measured the distance between the pins on the knife to maintain some symmetry. I clamped the now joined sheath to the drill press and slowly drilled, allowing the material to cool before completely penetrating through. I did this for each pin hole. My concern was melting the cured epoxy joining the sheath.
    [​IMG]
    In this photo, the pins are set with 5 min. epoxy. After curing, I trimmed the pins and cut off excess material from the sheath using the dremel. I then used sanding bits and hand sanded.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    I roughly have a completed sheath. There are a few high points I will address and finish using 220 and 400 grit. I rubbed the sheath using the oil from my hands for an hour or two to help match the shade of the oatmeal on the Pygmy. I will repeat this process again after finish sanding.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Thanks for the interest. I'll try to post up more photos after I get around to finish sanding.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2017
    hasco, Bmurray, Fiddleback and 9 others like this.
  2. Rob Z

    Rob Z Gold Member Gold Member

    23
    Oct 8, 2017
    Looking good perfect match
     
  3. FeralGentleman

    FeralGentleman Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 13, 2013
    That is awesome @nomotorjrr I could see a magnet or two being fitted inside such a sheath for a pretty neat setup. How is the retention with the leather alone?

    That would look extremely cool with a steel "welt" matching the thickness of the knife
     
    nomotorjrr likes this.
  4. fishface5

    fishface5 Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 3, 2001
    neat idea!
     
  5. nomotorjrr

    nomotorjrr Gold Member Gold Member

    35
    Apr 11, 2011
    Thanks! Magnets are a great idea. I wonder how magnetized the blade would become...The leather strip is holding up well so far. I used goop so it may be possible to replace the leather if needed.

    I really like the idea of a matching liner for the sheath!
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2017
    Fiddleback likes this.
  6. nomotorjrr

    nomotorjrr Gold Member Gold Member

    35
    Apr 11, 2011
  7. swonut

    swonut KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jan 1, 2007
    cool idea, thanks for sharing! For me, that's been one of the coolest things about this community; the willingness to share ideas and methods to better enjoy the knives.
     
    nomotorjrr and CAD like this.
  8. Panthera tigris

    Panthera tigris Apex Predator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Apr 21, 2012
    Magnets are problematic for me. For one, they magnetize the knife and then stuff sticks to it. Two, they demagnetize my credit cards. Three, they will screw up a pacemaker. Four, (insert diatribe)

    Sweet match though!
     
  9. Fiddleback

    Fiddleback Knifemaker Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Oct 19, 2005
    Nice work. Looks fantastic.
     
  10. nomotorjrr

    nomotorjrr Gold Member Gold Member

    35
    Apr 11, 2011
    @swonut I couldn't agree more about the feeling of community here. Thank you all for making me feel welcome.
    @Panthera tigris I didn't consider card magnetic strips much less a pacemaker. Whoa!
    @Fiddleback coming from you, this is such a compliment. I'm honored you think so. Thank you!

    Thank you to everyone for all of the kind words and encouragement as well as ideas and discussion. I'm positively beaming.
     
  11. FeralGentleman

    FeralGentleman Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 13, 2013
    @nomotorjrr I do have a magnetized-retention Bark River necker sheath here somewhere. Never really used it, but I will have to get it out and see the how long and to what degree these A2 knives becomes magnetized. Not sure off the top of my head what type or how strong of a magnet they use in it. Thanks for this thread, I need to make some dashi guards that have a little more style fitting to the blades than the quick fix leather holders I made.

    @Panthera tigris makes several valid points. For those unlucky enough to have had the trauma of a pacemaker installed, rare earth magnets are probably not the best idea unless you just like living life on the edge. Most of my cards and my use of cards these days are chip enabled, but my bigger concern would be debris getting in and stuck to the magnets inside the sheath on the magnets and scratching things up worse than kydex
     
  12. Gevonovich

    Gevonovich

    Jan 17, 2011
    Thanks so much for the look at your work in process ! Beam on :D
     
    nomotorjrr likes this.

Share This Page