Sharpening Opps S30V

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Sep 20, 2005
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297
I recently purchased the Spyderco native and finally decided after using it on some boxes that it could use some sharpening. I used the Spyderco sharpmaker with the white stones/rods on the edges. Well I immediately made it worse by flopping the edge from side to side, which I didn’t expect with S30V steel. Using lighter and lighter force I finally managed to realign the edge.

I probably should have burnished the blade, but I don’t have a steel yet. Does the edge flopping over so easily sound normal for S30V?
 

Cliff Stamp

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gbaker said:
Using lighter and lighter force I finally managed to realign the edge.

This usually doesn't work ideally, the edge which is produced often has low edge retention because you often leave weakened metal along the edge.

I probably should have burnished the blade, but I don’t have a steel yet.

You can't remove a burr that way, in fact you can only make it worse.

Does the edge flopping over so easily sound normal for S30V?

All steels behave like this if the metal is worn, the solution is to go more coarse and cut the burr off at an elevated angle, then resharpen.

Some initial edges are also less than optimal in performance so you need to cut some off before you get to quality.

-Cliff
 
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Cliff I appreciate your work and frequent your web site fairly often. I guess I’m trying to draw a distinction between the edge flopped over vs a burr. I wasn’t trying to create a burr I was trying to realign the edge, as you might with a chef knife. Maybe this is a distinction without a difference.

You seem to imply that if the edge is turned over its time to resharpen the blade as opposed to steeling it. Is this correct?
 

Cliff Stamp

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gbaker said:
I guess I’m trying to draw a distinction between the edge flopped over vs a burr.

An edge out of alignment has sections bent to the left and right and parts which are wavy and others which are impacted directly. A burr from sharpening tends to be uniformly bent to one side and usually contains debris from sharpening and pieces of almost removed steel.

When you use a smooth steel on a blunted edge which is deformed you basically iron out all the deformations by forcing them to one side and additionally flattening the edge by cold rolling it. This creates an edge which is similar in behavior to a burred edge from sharpening.

You seem to imply that if the edge is turned over its time to resharpen the blade as opposed to steeling it. Is this correct?

It depends. If you doing a lot of cutting you don't have time to sharpen, smooth steels are very easy to clean and very durable as opposed to ceramic hones. You can just give the edge a few swipes on a steel and keep cutting.

The edge is still deformed after steeling, just uniformly and thinner, however this makes the edge really weak and it will go blunt many times faster than when it was freshly sharpened as it deforms again much faster.

Do you have the time it takes to sharpen fully and remove the burr, if so then this is much better. If not then use the smooth steel. If you are going to be steeling a lot I would suggest that you stick to low carbide knife steels.

-Cliff
 
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