Short machetes

Discussion in 'General Knife Discussion' started by Yorkshire Boy, Mar 24, 2019.

  1. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 20, 2005
    I think you should probably handle those kinds of discussions via email. You should always wear gloves unless you're just making a couple chops with a machete. But some machetes "need gloves" more than others. ;)
     
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  2. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    From the time something leaves the hands of someone in the 'States it typically takes 1-2 weeks for an item to get to the UK and clear customs. For any other details, you can find my business email on my website, the link to which is in my signature line.

    Personally I'm of the opinion that gloves should be avoided if at all possible. Many kinds will be overly tacky and prevent a proper sliding motion of the handle in the hand, while others will become dangerous when used with that method because they're more slippery than your bare hand is. I find that I lose a significant degree of sensitivity to the task I'm performing when wearing gloves, and if the handle design is good and made with the right material and texture, then you shouldn't be getting hot spots. Similarly I advise against lanyards because they actually make the tool more dangerous in the event that you lose your grip and when used properly they prevent the freedom of hand/wrist action needed for good technique.
     
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  3. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 20, 2005
    I see your point about gloves. Your hands are probably more callused than mine. I would rather not have blisters after a session with a machete. Gloves also protect against foliage (especially briars or throny stuff) or other material from hitting the hands.

    On use note.... how much sliding is good with a short machete as to me they are similar to a long fixed blade for chopping, but a lot less expensive typically. They perform mostly the same function for me.
     
  4. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    I wouldn't consider my hands more than modestly callused--they sure aren't baby soft but if someone shakes my hand they're not going to be at all surprised by how rough my hands are. This is why appropriate handle design and fairly smooth handles are important--the rubbing from a pinch grip shouldn't be causing excessive friction. Grip security should come chiefly from the shape of the grip rather than its texture.

    With short machetes I still pivot them in the hand. "Whipping" a short blade takes more dialed-in technique than a long blade, but it's still the best way to maximize work output while minimizing your input energy. Driving from the elbow is rarely an optimum technique. :)
     
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  5. Rich Davis

    Rich Davis

    54
    Mar 4, 2016

    IMO there's gloves and there's gloves. I favor the Hatch Specialist Neoprene 430's which I use for pretty much most blade movement skills. I can grip well or move along a handle or halt with good tactile feedback. I believe Doug Marcaida uses something not that different during testing in forged in fire but I might be wrong on the specifics. For me, it's a world of difference between the Hatch and garden variety work gloves.
     
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  6. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    I'm something of a glove enthusiast so I know what you mean. And I still say that it's best to fully avoid gloves for machete usage, providing it's a well-designed machete and being used with good machete technique.
     
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  7. Bigfattyt

    Bigfattyt Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 23, 2007

    I have tested Kershaw Camp. It has a lot going for it. Quality sheath. Handle was more comfortable than my other machetes. It is thicker, and more ridgid than my other machetes, but chopped well.

    42blades knows his tools. So any advice he gives is worth listening too.
     
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  8. sliceofaloha

    sliceofaloha Gold Member Gold Member

    621
    Oct 4, 2018
    All thi
    All things considered I feel that shipping pricing call out was wack. I’d just as soon not sell to the customer in this situation. Complaints or grumbling would almost assuredly be forthcoming. I hate to be negative but I personally wouldn’t care to go out of my way for a sale in this case.
     
  9. Yorkshire Boy

    Yorkshire Boy

    947
    Sep 27, 2008
    Why would grumbling and complaints be forthcoming? I'm not considering buying anything from you but from a long term supporter of this site who has given free advice to me. If what I did was against forum rules then I'll edit my post.

    Thanks to everyone for their machete advice.
     
  10. CanadaKnifeGuy

    CanadaKnifeGuy

    496
    Jan 27, 2019
    Winter machete'ing in Canada calls for gloves.... sometimes think ones... So the grippier the handle, the better.
     
  11. Mecha

    Mecha Titanium Bladesmith Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Dec 27, 2013
    Machetes need to be sharpened occasionally.
     
  12. betover

    betover

    159
    Dec 1, 2015
    To me, 80 pounds for a machete is insane. Again this is just my point of view, a machete is something that should be almost disposable and having a US price of $10 or so. People in Central America (and some nightclubs in NYC) that use them everyday seem to use ordinary ones that you can get from Harbor Fright or your local hardware store. For 80 pounds or $106 US, I'm pretty sure I could get a knifemaker to make one. Wasn't there a Rambo movie in which he made a machete like knife out of a car bumper? Sorry, I just can't get past the 80 pounds.
     
  13. CanadaKnifeGuy

    CanadaKnifeGuy

    496
    Jan 27, 2019
    Tramotina makes some affordable, slightly flexy ones.
     
  14. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 20, 2005
    Betover said...."To me, 80 pounds for a machete is insane. Again this is just my point of view, a machete is something that should be almost disposable and having a US price of $10 or so. People in Central America (and some nightclubs in NYC) that use them everyday seem to use ordinary ones that you can get from Harbor Fright or your local hardware store." (Forgot to quote this, so I added it.)

    80 Pounds for an Condor Eco-Parang..... It is a little insane. But I don't agree that a machete needs to be $10 US (or so) and disposable (almost). The Eco-Parang is more than a "machete". I have the Village Parang and Pack Golok which are similar kinds of choppers. Love them when I want to mostly chop. Condor provides a great leather sheath. That's worth something. Worth a lot to me considering the pieces of crap machete sheaths I have used over the years before I discovered Condor. Yeah, 80 Pounds.... Go for it.

    A good handle makes a machete work. A poorly designed handle means "pain".

    Folks that buy a Harbor Freight machete do not buy Condor machetes. Different customer base.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2019
  15. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    If going with a budget machete, I'd go with Tramontina, Imacasa, Gavilan/Incolma, Hansa, etc. long before I'd even so much as consider a Harbor Freight model.
     
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  16. dirc

    dirc

    Jan 31, 2018
    this is the perfect starting point, imho, for about $15 including special grade work by @FortyTwoBlades , you can't beat the simple 1070 tramo 14" (or the 14" bolo for more weight forward)

    upgrade to a condor or anything else listed on this thread, later, if you really need more heft and shape & sheath etc...

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2019
  17. KooKooforKukripuffs

    KooKooforKukripuffs

    299
    Jul 25, 2018
    You'll need this to meet the OPs original "specs"
    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
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  18. KooKooforKukripuffs

    KooKooforKukripuffs

    299
    Jul 25, 2018
    This is a dandy too
    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
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  19. dirc

    dirc

    Jan 31, 2018
    my only concern is that marbles uses 1050 or 1055 sometimes? it never seems to include info like that... anyone know for sure?
     
  20. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    Marbles machetes are made by Imacasa and are 1075 like their other machetes, to the best of my knowledge.

    As far as the Tramontina goes, I'm able to throw together an ambidextrous out-the-top HDPE sheath with a swiveling belt loop for about $12. I don't have 'em on the site but will eventually when I get all the dang Kingfisher Machetes taken care of (yeah, I'm still working on those daily--almost done, just in time for the next round to land...) but for individual orders I'm still able to take on quick stuff like that.
     
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