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Silly question?

Discussion in 'General Knife Discussion' started by Cloudstrife, Nov 16, 2020.

  1. Cloudstrife

    Cloudstrife

    45
    Sep 14, 2019
  2. killgar

    killgar

    Sep 24, 2002
    I can't say if they're normal, I don't generally look at my knife blades under a microscope.

    This may be an example of too much technology NOT being a good thing.

    I don't think those tiny "holes" are anything to be worried about, especially if they are just in an outer blade coating.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2020
  3. not2sharp

    not2sharp Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 29, 1999
    It could be a corrosion (rust) micro pitting.

    n2s
     
    Cloudstrife likes this.
  4. Cloudstrife

    Cloudstrife

    45
    Sep 14, 2019
    Put some tuff over it cheers for the responses.
     
  5. GIRLYmann

    GIRLYmann

    Nov 7, 2005
    you should check out the random
    surface pits on low end steels found on
    prc cutlery.
    i figure the odd few pits could be structural,
    and not marks from abrasives materials used in the manufacturing
    processes when fashioning
    or finishing a blade's aurface..
    just my 2 cents
     
    Cloudstrife likes this.
  6. Cloudstrife

    Cloudstrife

    45
    Sep 14, 2019
    Hey mate this is a very reputable company and it’s S35vn steel is that helps. Cheers.
     
  7. rxavage

    rxavage

    Aug 16, 2014
    Not a hole. Just Stock removal and the human eye at work here.
     
    Alberta Ed and Cloudstrife like this.
  8. Hal

    Hal

    458
    Feb 26, 1999
    My willingness to overlook things is inversely proportional to the amount of money I paid for that object.

    Translation - on a $50 and under knife, I can overlook that. Once it goes over $50, I start wondering what's up because I have plenty of cheap knives that don't have that flaw.
     
    Cloudstrife likes this.
  9. not2sharp

    not2sharp Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 29, 1999
    What knife is this?

    n2s
     
  10. Icky Thump

    Icky Thump Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 8, 2011
    There are no silly questions. There are only silly people.
     
    CWL and Cloudstrife like this.
  11. Mikel_24

    Mikel_24

    Sep 19, 2007
    Any chance it is just the coating? Otherwise it is clearly a defect in the material.

    I had a Victorinox chef knife and I noticed a chip on the edge. But it didn't look bright or shiny by any means, more of a brownish color. I put some pressure on it with my thumb nail and a lentil sized chunk of steel crumbled. It was clearly a defect from the steel stock before the knife was made. I took it to the cutlery store and they basically butchered the knife with a regrind instead of replacing it. So it has now basically no belly at all, so it is pretty useless for chopping veggies on the cutting board.

    Mikel
     
    Cloudstrife likes this.
  12. herisson

    herisson Apple slicing rocking chair dweller Platinum Member

    Mar 11, 2013
    It's not a silly question but going OCD on a mass production knife might be. Mass production is just that : produced in mass and that means quality checks are done by batches. The higher the mass, the lower the price and the larger the batches... So, yes, many things can go wrong from one QC to the other. This said, going all microscopy on a + 50 $ knife seems very OCD. If it's not a structural defect, live with it, use the heck out of your knife and think of the next knife you will buy.
     
    Cloudstrife likes this.
  13. Hal

    Hal

    458
    Feb 26, 1999
    Maybe - maybe not.
    A CRK - $375 - $450 is a mass production knife.
    I spend that kind of money, and I expect it to be next to perfect.

    As I mentioned before - my propensity towards flaws of any kind goes down as the price tag goes up.
     
    Cloudstrife likes this.
  14. Zulus

    Zulus Gold Member Gold Member

    515
    May 29, 2020
    Nothing alarming for me.
    Usual for standard made metals.
    Is it Made in ...... ?
     
    Cloudstrife likes this.
  15. DocJD

    DocJD

    Jan 29, 2016
    Not silly , but also not a problem , IMO .

    Advise stop worrying and go out cut up some stuff ! :cool::thumbsup:
     
    Cloudstrife likes this.
  16. marcinek

    marcinek

    Jan 9, 2007
    Those are not normal. They are more than unsightly, and are, in fact, down right dangerous.

    Send the knife to me and I will dispose of it safely.
     
    Cloudstrife likes this.
  17. skyhorse

    skyhorse Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 30, 2010
    Looks like a blade coating to me ? If so you can strip it. You can easily change the finish with a Dremel and some polishing compound.
     
  18. afishhunter

    afishhunter Basic Member Basic Member

    Oct 21, 2014
    you sure the "holes" ain't specks of dirt or something?

    Even "mirror polished" steel won't be perfectly diamond/crystal smooth. Small indentations and scratches are "normal".

    I see nothing to worry/fret about or lose sleep over.
    None of those "holes" go all the way through the blade stock.
    There are no micro cracks that could potentially cause the blade to break if you baton it, or beat a block of ice, or antler/bone, or otherwise abuse the knife, as routinely done on 'FORGED IN FIRE'.

    I seriously doubt if you sent it back to the maker or dealer they would find anything wrong with it that would justify repair, replacement, or refund.

    Unless I'm missing something, you were happy with the knife until after looking at highly magnified images of the blade. With proper care, no abuse, no over sharpening, etc. I don't see any reason why that knife won't last several generations after you.

    Just so you are aware, nothing made by or designed by humans is "perfect", regardless of cost.

    As my (maternal) great grandfather (1892-1974) used to say: "Expect perfection; be eternally disappointed."

    By the way, as a former auto body repairman, I can tell you that if you magnify a random spot/area of paint on your vehicle enough, you will discover gaps with no paint larger than those "holes".
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2020
    Cloudstrife and Rich S like this.
  19. Cloudstrife

    Cloudstrife

    45
    Sep 14, 2019
    Thanks for the responses it’s a $450 dagger I won’t be using it so I guess it’s not an issue.
     
  20. Cloudstrife

    Cloudstrife

    45
    Sep 14, 2019
    I never buy anything not made in USA knife wise.
     

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